10:24 AM 10/11/2017 – TRUMP-RUSSIA Updates – Selected and Saved News Stories

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TRUMP-RUSSIA

The House Intelligence Committee chairman Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) issued subpoenas on Oct.4 to employees at the Fusion GPS research firm, which worked with former British Intelligence officer Christopher Steele to compile a salacious dossier about the Trump campaigns alleged connections to Russia. Evan Perez, Manu Raju and Jeremy Herb report at CNN.

Nunes issued the subpoenas without consulting Democrats on the Committee, three sources told NBC News, according to the Committees rules Nunes did not need approval from minority Democrats to sign-off on the subpoenas. Ken Dilanian and Alex Moe report at NBC News.

The Trump campaigns former foreign policy adviser Carter Page will not testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee about the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. electionPage informed the committee yesterday, a source familiar with the matter stating that Page would rely on the Fifth Amendment. Ali Watkins reports at POLITICO.

The House Intelligence, Senate Intelligence and Senate Judiciary committees are competing in their efforts to pursue the allegations made in the Steele dossier, with the members of the congressional panels taking various positions on the dossier. Mark Hosenball and Jonathan Landay report at Reuters.

Special counsel Robert Mueller cannot and will not save us, Muellers elusive qualities stand in stark opposition to the presidents bombastic style, but the reality is that his investigation may take years to complete, Trumps actions may not amount to legal wrongdoing and the questions about the presidents moral authority would remain. Quinta Jurecic writes at the Washington Post.

Selected and Saved News Stories – Trump 

Saved Stories – 1. Trump
The Early Edition: October 11, 2017
Republican donors, seeking a win on something, take aim at Senate GOP leaders – USA TODAY
Trump the Entertainer – Common Dreams
The Morning Hype: Putin Comes Down On Bitcoin, Trump Gets Interviewed By Forbes, And NYC Traffic Is Expensive – TheStreet.com
Crimea Isn’t the End of Russia’s Black Sea Ambitions – Bloomberg
Jimmy Fallon Blasts Off On Trump’s Space Program In ‘Pros And Cons’
Is It Time to Regulate Silicon Valley? – The Ringer (blog)
How Donald Trumps Iran policy has emboldened North Korea
Scarborough: Destruction of GOP will be part of Trump’s legacy – The Hill
Ken Starr praises Mueller’s Trump-Russia probe – The Hill (blog)
News Roundup: Trump just can’t stop himself from repeating this lie – Salt Lake Tribune
How American Horror Story: Cult Handled a Mass Shooting After the Las Vegas Attack – Vulture
US congressional panels spar over ‘Trump dossier’ on Russia contacts – Reuters.com
Terrorist Financing: A Backgrounder
Sebastian Gorka: ‘Pence rule on women would prevent abuse’ – BBC News
If Trump Wants A War With Women, These Lawyers Are Ready For Battle
Armenia supports Russia’s statement in CIS on supporting Traditional family values President Sargsyan – Armenpress.am
Terrorist Financing: A Backgrounder – Just Security
Donald Trump May Not Get A State Banquet With Queen Elizabeth II, But Vladimir Putin Did – Newsweek
US supreme court dismisses challenge to Trump travel ban
Trump chief of staffs phone was breached for nearly a year, say sources
The Trouble With Tycoons In The White House
How Russia Harvested American Rage to Reshape US Politics – New York Times
Ivanka Trumps week from Hell
Russia throws Donald Trump and Donald Trump Jr under the bus

 

Saved Stories – 1. Trump
The Early Edition: October 11, 2017

Before the start of business, Just Securityprovides a curated summary of up-to-the-minute developments at home and abroad. Heres todays news.

NORTH KOREA

Suspected North Korean hackers stole classified military documents when they broke into South Koreas defense data center in September 2016, a South Korean lawmaker Rhee Cheol-hee said in an interview published yesterday, the information included a U.S.-South Korea blueprint for a possible war with North Korea and details about a decapitation strike targeting leader Kim Jong-un and top Pyongyang officials. Kwanwoo Jun and Nancy A. Youssef report at the Wall Street Journal.

Rhee received information about the suspected hacking incident from defense ministry officials, South Koreas defense ministry has not responded to his comments and the Pentagon has similarly declined to comment on the specific reports. Zachary Cohen reports at CNN.

The U.S. and South Korea began joint military exercises over the Korean peninsula last night amid heightened tensions, the drills consisting of strategic bombers, fighter jets and an air-to-ground missile drill off South Koreas coast. The BBC reports.

The U.S. military conducted drills with Japanese fighter jets after the exercise with South Korea, the U.S. military said in a statement, marking the first time that the U.S. has conducted drills with both the Japanese and South Korean military at night. Christine Kim and Eric Beech report at Reuters.

Trump met with his top national security advisers yesterday to discuss a range of options to deal with the North Korea threat, the White House said in a statement, the president receiving briefings from Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph Dunford during the meeting. Jesse Byrnes reports at the Hill.

Trump may visit the demilitarized zone (D.M.Z.) between the two Koreas during a forthcoming trip to South Korea, South Koreas Yonhap news agency reported yesterday. Justin McCurry reports at the Guardian.

The Trump administration has made progress in its attempts to contain North Korea and, despite the presidents bluster and the general pessimism about the administrations strategy, there are reasons to be cautiously optimistic about the U.S.s efforts to economically and diplomatically isolate the regime. Adam Taylor provides an analysis of the administrations policies and the reaction of the international community to the U.S. pressure campaign at the Washington Post.

TURKEY

The U.S. ambassador to Turkey John R. Bass should have resigned or been recalled after making the unilateral decision to suspend visas for Turkish citizens, Turkish President Reçep Tayyip Erdoğan said yesterday. The State Department responded that the decision was cleared at the highest levels of the U.S. government and emphasized that Ambassador Bass has the full backing of the State Department and the White House. Carlotta Gall reports at the New York Times.

Turkey does not see Bass as the representative of the United States in Turkey, Erdoğan added; the dispute about the suspension of visas following Turkeys arrest of an employee in the U.S. Consulate in Istanbul last week providing the latest incident in the deteriorating U.S.-Turkey relationship. The AFPreports.

Bass expressed hope that the dispute could be resolved quickly and noted that close security cooperation between the U.S. and Turkey has helped to reduce attacks by Islamic State militants in Turkey. The AP reports.

The U.S.-Turkey diplomatic dispute has not impacted military operations, Pentagon spokesperson Col. Robert Manning told reporters yesterday, stating that Turkey remains a close N.A.T.O. ally. Reuters reports.

A Wall Street Journal reporter was sentenced to prison in Turkey for engaging in terrorist propaganda in support of the Kurdistan Workers Party (P.K.K.), demonstrating the Turkish governments aggressive policies to repress critical reporting under the state of emergency imposed since last years failed coup against Erdoğan. Thomas Grove reports at the Wall Street Journal.

The conviction of the reporter confirms to the world that Erdoğan has turned Turkey into an authoritarian state, the Wall Street Journal editorial board writes.

Erdoğans tactic of arresting U.S. citizens is an attempt to bully America and the Trump administration must make it clear that Turkey cannot carry on its actions without risking a rupture of relations. The Washington Post editorial board writes.

IRAN

The 2015 Iran nuclear deal is vitally important for regional security, U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May said in a phone call to Trump yesterday, urging the president to recertify Irans compliance with the agreement. The BBC reports.

Trump misleadingly blamed Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) for the Iran deal. Linda Qiu explains the passage of a bipartisan bill in the spring of 2015 to provide the appropriate context at the New York Times.

The future of the deal would be uncertain should Trump decertify Irans compliance before the Oct. 15 deadline and put the issue of sanctions on Iran into Congresss hands likely leading to a partisan battle and complicating the issue for the other countries party to the agreement. Julian Borger and Patrick Wintour explain at the Guardian.

The Trump administration, Congress and European allies could save the deal and address its shortcomings even if Trump decides to decertify Irans compliance with the agreement by drawing on the relationship with international partners, using existing sanctions authorities and measures to counter Irans actions in the region, developing a common strategy with European allies, and Congress using its powers to counter the constant cycle of deal crisis. Ilana Goldenberg and Elizabeth Rosenberg write at Foreign Policy.

Irans interest in the Middle Easts affairs are not malevolent, its actions ensure stability in the face of Western-backed Arab interference. Irans Foreign Minister Javad Zarif writes at the Atlantic, also defending the nuclear deal.

TRUMP-RUSSIA

The House Intelligence Committee chairman Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) issued subpoenas on Oct.4 to employees at the Fusion GPS research firm, which worked with former British Intelligence officer Christopher Steele to compile a salacious dossier about the Trump campaigns alleged connections to Russia. Evan Perez, Manu Raju and Jeremy Herb report at CNN.

Nunes issued the subpoenas without consulting Democrats on the Committee, three sources told NBC News, according to the Committees rules Nunes did not need approval from minority Democrats to sign-off on the subpoenas. Ken Dilanian and Alex Moe report at NBC News.

The Trump campaigns former foreign policy adviser Carter Page will not testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee about the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. electionPage informed the committee yesterday, a source familiar with the matter stating that Page would rely on the Fifth Amendment. Ali Watkins reports at POLITICO.

The House Intelligence, Senate Intelligence and Senate Judiciary committees are competing in their efforts to pursue the allegations made in the Steele dossier, with the members of the congressional panels taking various positions on the dossier. Mark Hosenball and Jonathan Landay report at Reuters.

Special counsel Robert Mueller cannot and will not save us, Muellers elusive qualities stand in stark opposition to the presidents bombastic style, but the reality is that his investigation may take years to complete, Trumps actions may not amount to legal wrongdoing and the questions about the presidents moral authority would remain. Quinta Jurecic writes at the Washington Post.

CYBERSECURITY, PRIVACY AND TECHNOLOGY

The Israeli intelligence service hacked the Russia-based Kaspersky Lab cybersecurity firm and informed the U.S. about Russian intrusion through Kaspersky software, including classified documents that were stolen from a National Security Agency (N.S.A.) employee. Nicole Perlroth and Scott Shane reveal the Israeli operation at the New York Times.

The Kaspersky Lab does not possess any knowledge of Israels hack, the firm said in a statement responding to the reports. Ellen Nakashima reports at the Washington Post.

SYRIA

The Syrian Army and Syrian Kurds are competing for control of oil-producing areas, Syrias Foreign Minister Walid al-Moualem said today, warning that Syria would not allow its sovereignty to be violated under any conditions. Reuters reports.

Raqqas Civil Council is leading discussions to determine the best way to enable civilians trapped by Islamic State militants to exit the Syrian city ahead of the impending defeat of the militants, U.S. Centcom have said in a statement.

An overview of the parties to the Syrian war and the various alliances is provided by Samer Abboud at Al Jazeera.

U.S.-led airstrikes continue. U.S. and coalition forces carried out four airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Syria on October 9. Separately, partner forces conducted seven strikes against targets in Iraq. [Central Command]

IRAQ

The Islamic States fight to take over Iraqi territory has displaced 5.4 million civilians, the U.N. humanitarian coordinator for Iraq said yesterday, expressing deep concern for the civilians who have fled the fighting. The BBC reports.

Although the Islamic State group has lost significant territory in Iraq, it has not been fully defeated. John Beck explains where the militants still hold territory and influence at Al Jazeera.

ISRAEL-PALESTINE

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu approved plans for 3,736 units in Jewish settlements in the occupied West Bank yesterday, with activists stating that the Israeli government has been spurred by the Trump administrations accommodating stance. Ruth Eglash and Loveday Morris report at the Washington Post.

The Egyptian military expanded the buffer zone along the Gaza Strip border, bulldozing at least 140 homes and more than 200 acres in an attempt to prevent Palestinian Hamas militants from using underground tunnels to evade Israel and Egypts blockade of the Strip. Sam Madgy reports at the AP.

The Obama administrations policies pushed Israel and Arab nations closer together as they realized they shared similar concerns about Obamas approach to the Arab Spring uprising, the Iran nuclear deal and Irans expansionism in the region. Haisam Hassanein and Wesam Hassanein write at the Wall Street Journal.

LEBANON

The Lebanese Shiite Hezbollah militant group aspire to attack the U.S. homeland, senior U.S. officials have said. Elise Labott and Laura Koran report at CNN.

The Lebanese army has become an integral part of Hezbollah, Israels defense minister Avigdor Lieberman said yesterday, claiming that the militant group controls the Lebanese army. The APreports.

The SUPREME COURT

The Supreme Court dismissed a travel ban case from Maryland yesterday but took no action on a separate case from Hawaii that concerns the travel ban and the refugee ban, the AP reports.

The Supreme Court yesterday declined to review the conviction of a war criminal held in Guantánamo Guatánamo Bay and serving a life sentence. Carol Rosenberg reports at the Miami Herald.

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION FOREIGN POLICY

Trump does not plan to fill many positions across federal agencies because they are totally unnecessary, the president told Forbes yesterday, suggesting that the many vacancies in the State Department, including ambassadorships, will remain unfilled. Olivia Beavers reports at the Hill.

The Trump administrations lack of clear foreign policy plans may be a bigger issue than the presidents heightened rhetoric, David Ignatius writes at the Washington Post.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

Russia may order the U.S. to cut its diplomatic staff in Russia to 300 people or below, Russias R.I.A. news agency quoted a Russias foreign ministry official as saying today. Reuters reports.

A U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer sailed near islands claimed by China in the South China Sea yesterday, with the Chinese defense ministry saying today that the U.S. maneuvering operation was a provocation. Idrees Ali reports at Reuters.

The collision involving the U.S.S. John S. McCain and a civilian tanker on Aug. 21 was preventable, the U.S. Navy said yesterday, adding that its investigation is still ongoing. Jake Maxwell Watts reports at the Wall Street Journal.

Yemens warring leaders are not interested in finding solutions, as they will lose their power and control in a settlement, the U.N. special envoy for Yemen Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed said yesterday, urging the Security Council to use all of its political and economic power to exert pressure on all parties to commit to a pact of peace. Edith M. Lederer reports at the AP.

The Trump administration intends to relax domestic rules on U.S. military drone sales to allies as part of an overhaul of U.S. arms export protocols. Matt Spetalnick and Mike Stone report at Reuters.

Trump was joking when he challenged Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to an IQ test, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said yesterday, the presidents latest comments having reinforced impressions that Trump and Tillerson have a tense relationship. Louis Nelson reports at POLITICO.

The allegations that Cuba used a sonic weapon to attack U.S. diplomats in Havana are not backed up by evidence and it is unfortunate that Trump has used the unspecified threat and amplified reports to undermine relations with Cuba. Lisa Diedrich and Benjamin Tausig write at the New York Times.

Read on Just Security »

Republican donors, seeking a win on something, take aim at Senate GOP leaders – USA TODAY


USA TODAY
Republican donors, seeking a win on something, take aim at Senate GOP leaders
USA TODAY
WASHINGTON Republican leaders in the Senate are facing increasingly vocal pressure from some of the party’s wealthy contributors to chalk up a legislative win by quickly passing tax cuts or see campaign contributions dwindle or shift to their 
Trump foments the Republican civil war of 2017The Hill
Rush Limbaugh: Steve Bannon Is ‘Taking Over the Role of the Republican PartyBreitbart News
STAR PARKER: Judge Roy Moore bolsters Republican Party credibilityNews Sentinel
New York Post
all 130 news articles »
Trump the Entertainer – Common Dreams


Common Dreams
Trump the Entertainer
Common Dreams
Among the many explanations for the Trump phenomenon and I have proposed a fair number myself I would add this one: He knows how to put on a show for an electorate who likes shows. He thinks in terms of episodes. He knows how to bait the press 

The Morning Hype: Putin Comes Down On Bitcoin, Trump Gets Interviewed By Forbes, And NYC Traffic Is Expensive – TheStreet.com


TheStreet.com
The Morning Hype: Putin Comes Down On Bitcoin, Trump Gets Interviewed By Forbes, And NYC Traffic Is Expensive
TheStreet.com
The Morning Hype: Putin Comes Down On Bitcoin, Trump Gets Interviewed By Forbes, And NYC Traffic Is Expensive. Uber Now Has FIVE Criminal Probes Surrounding It, Good Luck Khosrowshahi (via Bloomberg) California Passes Bill Requiring Drug …

Crimea Isn’t the End of Russia’s Black Sea Ambitions – Bloomberg


Bloomberg
Crimea Isn’t the End of Russia’s Black Sea Ambitions
Bloomberg
For Russia in particular, old ghosts rattle through the Black Sea, especially on the Crimean Peninsula. In the mid-19th century, the forces of the Ottoman Empire, Britain, France and other allied European powers fought the Czar’s Russia there 

and more »

Jimmy Fallon Blasts Off On Trump’s Space Program In ‘Pros And Cons’

There’s no need to visit this particular “moon.”

Is It Time to Regulate Silicon Valley? – The Ringer (blog)


The Ringer (blog)
Is It Time to Regulate Silicon Valley?
The Ringer (blog)
Russian agents also bought ads on Google, the search giant disclosed this week. … The Federal Trade Commission, in an attempt to lessen the influence of a single tech giant, could bring an antitrust suit against a company that had concentrated too 

and more »

How Donald Trumps Iran policy has emboldened North Korea

Pyongyang will see a failure of the nuclear deal as proof the US cannot be trusted
Scarborough: Destruction of GOP will be part of Trump’s legacy – The Hill


The Hill
Scarborough: Destruction of GOP will be part of Trump’s legacy
The Hill
Joe Scarborough on Wednesday slammed President Trump on Twitter, writing that the president is destroying the GOP. The destruction of the Republican Party will be part Trump’s political legacy, and the least damning, he wrote.
Are Republicans against deficits? Depends if Obama or Trump is doing the spendingLos Angeles Times

all 2 news articles »

Ken Starr praises Mueller’s Trump-Russia probe – The Hill (blog)


The Hill (blog)
Ken Starr praises Mueller’s Trump-Russia probe
The Hill (blog)
Ken Starr, the former independent counsel in the Whitewater and Monica Lewinsky scandals during the Clinton administration praised Special Counsel Robert Mueller on Wednesday, calling his handling of the Russia probe aggressive and professional.

News Roundup: Trump just can’t stop himself from repeating this lie – Salt Lake Tribune


Salt Lake Tribune
News Roundup: Trump just can’t stop himself from repeating this lie
Salt Lake Tribune
FILE – In this Dec. 7, 2015, file photo, Republican presidential candidate, businessman Donald Trump, speaks during a rally coinciding with Pearl Harbor Day at Patriots Point aboard the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown in Mt. Pleasant, S.C. Israel’s Prime

How American Horror Story: Cult Handled a Mass Shooting After the Las Vegas Attack – Vulture


Vulture
How American Horror Story: Cult Handled a Mass Shooting After the Las Vegas Attack
Vulture
But in its seventh season, American Horror Story: Cult, the anthology series takes that approach to of-the-moment levels by setting its action around the 2016 presidential election and commenting directly on the national climate now that Donald Trump 

and more »

US congressional panels spar over ‘Trump dossier’ on Russia contacts – Reuters.com


Reuters.com
US congressional panels spar over ‘Trump dossier’ on Russia contacts
Reuters.com
The Senate Intelligence Committee and special counsel Robert Mueller are looking into possible collusion between Russia andTrump’s campaign and Mueller’s investigators have met with Steele. … This is a blatant attempt to undermine the reporting of

Terrorist Financing: A Backgrounder

Ed. note. This post  is the latest in our series on the upcoming U.S. Supreme Court case Jesner. v. Arab Bank, a case that is slated to resolve the question of whether corporations can be sued under international law.

One of the causes of action asserted in the Supreme Court’s case, Jesner v. Arab Bank, is terrorist financing, an international crime also at issue in the case brought by Ukraine against Russia before the International Court of Justice (see my coverage here). This article provides background on the multilateral treaty prohibiting terrorist financing and calling for perpetrators to be brought to justice, both criminally and civilly. It also situates this treaty within other multilateral efforts to prohibit various manifestations of terrorism.

The prohibition on terrorist financing finds expression in the International Convention for the Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism (Convention), adopted by the United Nations on December 9, 1999, with Resolution A/54/109.  The Convention went into effect on April 10, 2002, and has been ratified by all U.N. states with the exception of Burundi, Chad, Eritrea, Gambia, Iran, Lebanon, Somalia, and South Sudan.

The heart of the Convention is found in Article 2(1), which defines the target offense as follows:

Any person commits an offence within the meaning of this Convention if that person by any means, directly or indirectly, unlawfully and wilfully, provides or collects funds with the intention that they should be used or in the knowledge that they are to be used, in full or in part, in order to carry out:

(a) An act which constitutes an offense within the scope of and as defined in one of the treaties listed in the annex; or

(b) Any other act intended to cause death or serious bodily injury to a civilian, or to any other person not taking an active part in the hostilities in a situation of armed conflict, when the purpose of such an act, by its 1nature or context, is to intimidate a population, or to compel a government or an international organization to do or abstain from doing any act.

The prohibited act is complete once the funds are conveyed; it is not necessary to prove that the funds were actually used to carry out a terrorist offense.

The Convention broke new ground by identifying the purpose of terrorism, namely to terrorize the population. The treaty is thus premised upon the actual intention, or knowledge, that the funds will be used to carry out one of the offenses listed in an annex to the Convention. This specific intent element is important because it distinguishes the financing of terrorism from legitimate humanitarian assistance or international investment. It also distinguishes acts of terrorism from ordinary crimesa challenge for all of international criminal law.

An express goal of the treaty drafters was to oblige states to bring to justice those who provided the financial backing for terrorist acts.  In addition to the direct perpetration of terrorist financing, the treaty also prohibits attempts, acts of complicity, and individuals who contribute to a group acting with a common purpose.  The treaty permits states to apply a whole range of jurisdictional bases, including when the perpetrator is merely present in the state, even if the perpetrator is not a national and the offence did not occur in that state. In this way, the treatylike many other terrorism treatiesprovides for a form of qualified universal jurisdiction over offences.

The Convention also requires state signatories to enable civil liability for perpetratorsincluding legal persons.  Article 5 mandates each state,

in accordance with its domestic legal principles, shall take the necessary measures to enable a legal entity located in its territory or organized under its laws to be held liable when a person responsible for the management or control of that legal entity has, in that capacity, committed an offence set forth in article 2.

Such liability is incurred without prejudice to the criminal liability of individuals having committed the offences per Article 5 of the Convention.

Prior to the terror attacks of 9/11, the United Nations had adopted twelve thematic multilateral anti-terrorism conventions prohibiting different manifestations of terrorism, such as hijacking, terrorist bombing, or hostage-taking.  These are the crimes incorporated by reference in the Article 2(a) definition above.

This patchwork approach reflected the fact that states could not agree on an omnibus definition of terrorism that might undergird a comprehensive convention against terrorism. A number of sticking points emerged as obstacles in this endeavor. Most importantly was the question of whether violent acts committed against privileged combatants representing a state by unprivileged combatants representing a non-state armed group constitute terrorism.  Such acts are not considered war crimes by international humanitarian law (a.k.a. the law of armed conflict), so if they were to be prohibited by international law it would have to be under a different basis. This controversy first arose with respect to national liberation movements, such as the fight against apartheid (think: “One man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter”). Today, this question arises in many of the cases before U.S. military commissions that involve acts of violence against U.S. military personnel. Another obstacle to the emergence of a comprehensive definition of terrorism is a lack of consensus about whether there is such a concept of state terrorism.

The Financing Convention actually came close to a comprehensive definition of terrorism when it prohibited the donation or collection of funds to support

[a]ny other act intended to cause death or serious bodily injury when the purpose of such act, by its nature or context, is to intimidate a population, or to compel a government or an international organization to do or to abstain from doing any act.

Eleven days post-9/11, the UN Security Council with UNSCR 1373 rendered the suite of terrorism treaties binding on all states, even non-signatories. In particular, this Chapter VII resolution mandated that all States shall . . . [p]revent and suppress the financing of terrorist acts.   UNSCR 1373 also set up a monitoring process that obliged states to report within 90 days how they planned to comply with UNSCR 1373.

Given that the Convention is well-subscribed to and that its prohibitions now apply to all states by virtue of their UN Charter obligations, U.S. courts should have no trouble concluding that acts of terrorism also violate customary international law. I took up this question in this article, which argues that the prohibition against torture is now sufficiently defined and universal to satisfy the Supreme Courts test in Sosa v. Alvarez-Machain.  This question is not before the Supreme Court in Jesner, but may arise on remand.

Read on Just Security »

Sebastian Gorka: ‘Pence rule on women would prevent abuse’ – BBC News


BBC News
Sebastian Gorka: ‘Pence rule on women would prevent abuse’
BBC News
Mr Gorka suggested Vice President Mike Pence’s own rules about meeting with the opposite sex could prevent women from being abused. A fierce debate raged online earlier this year after reports emerged of the vice president’s refusal to dine one-on-one …

If Trump Wants A War With Women, These Lawyers Are Ready For Battle

The newly formed Legal Network for Gender Equity was created to combat the White House’s “all-out assault on women’s rights.”

Armenia supports Russia’s statement in CIS on supporting Traditional family values President Sargsyan – Armenpress.am


Armenpress.am
Armenia supports Russia’s statement in CIS on supporting Traditional family values President Sargsyan
Armenpress.am
Armenia has repeatedly highlighted the need for the international community to unite efforts in fight against phenomena like international terrorism, extremism and organized crime. I support the adoption of respective documents that regulate the 

and more »

Terrorist Financing: A Backgrounder – Just Security


Just Security
Terrorist Financing: A Backgrounder
Just Security
Arab Bank, is terrorist financing, an international crime also at issue in the case brought by Ukraine against Russia before the International Court of Justice (see my coverage here). This article provides … in accordance with its domestic legal 

Donald Trump May Not Get A State Banquet With Queen Elizabeth II, But Vladimir Putin Did – Newsweek

Donald Trump May Not Get A State Banquet With Queen Elizabeth II, But Vladimir Putin Did
Newsweek
President Donald Trump’s first trip to the U.K. early next year will reportedly not be a full state visit, but rather a stripped-down working visit during which he won’t even meet the Queen or get a big banquet at Buckingham Palace. If true, Trump 

US supreme court dismisses challenge to Trump travel ban

Justice say challenge was moot because Trump signed a proclamation in September that replaced his temporary travel ban with a new version

The supreme court on Tuesday dismissed one of two cases over Donald Trumps ban on visitors from mostly Muslim countries, suggesting it will step away from the controversy for now.

Related: Trump demands Congress fund border wall as price for keeping Dreamers

Continue reading…

Trump chief of staffs phone was breached for nearly a year, say sources

The personal cell phone of the White House Chief of Staff John Kelly was compromised by persons unknown and may have been bugged for nearly a year, according to United States government officials. 

The Trouble With Tycoons In The White House

Like Hoover before him, the same traits that propelled Trump to the presidency now limit his ability to govern effectively.

How Russia Harvested American Rage to Reshape US Politics – New York Times


New York Times
How Russia Harvested American Rage to Reshape US Politics
New York Times
This past March, another of the Russian pages, Secured Borders, reposted a video that it attributed to Conservative Tribune, part of the conservative and pro-Trump sites run by Patrick Brown. The video, which falsely claims that Michigan allows Muslim …
Google uncovered Russia-backed ads on YouTube, Gmail : sourceReuters
Google uncovers Russian-bought Russian-bought ads on YouTube, Gmail and other  platforms Washington Post
Microsoft investigates Russian pro-Trump adsSky News
BBC NewsABC Online ABC NewsDaily Beast
all 200 New York Daily News
all 182
 
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Ivanka Trumps week from Hell

Donald Trump is having a mighty bad week, with Republican Senator Bob Corker opening the floodgates against him by acknowledging that he’s a dangerous whack job. Mike Pence is having an even worse week, as his NFL game walkout stunt was exposed as having been dishonestly staged. But someone else in the White House is having the worst week of all, and it just got even worse for her: Ivanka Trump, who’s having a week from Hell.

Over the past week it’s been revealed that Ivanka Trump improperly used a personal email account for White House government business and that when she got caught, she tried to cover it up by moving her personal email account to a private email server (link). This means she’s guilty of an actual email scandal, as opposed to the imaginary “email scandal” that her father helped invent about Hillary Clinton. Even as investigators close in on her and Congress seeks to revoke her security clearance, something even uglier went wrong for her.

Ivanka Trump’s mother Ivana Trump unloaded on Ivanka’s stepmother Melania Trump today in bizarre fashion. Ivana declared “I’m first lady” because she was Donald Trump’s first wife. She then said the only reason she doesn’t call Donald at the White House is so Melania won’t get jealous (link). Ivana is promoting a new book, and is seeking to stir up controversy accordingly. But she’s thrown a whole new monkey wrench into the dynamic of America’s trashiest family, and it’s put Ivanka right at the center of it.

Imagine if your mom and your stepmom were publicly feuding with each other, at a time when you had a job inside the house where your stepmom lives. That’s the situation Ivanka Trump now finds herself in. As this white trash family feud plays out in her face, Ivanka is also trying to fend off investigators on all sides.

The post Ivanka Trump’s week from Hell appeared first on Palmer Report.

Russia throws Donald Trump and Donald Trump Jr under the bus

Russia throws Donald Trump and Donald Trump Jr under the bus

Russia throws Donald Trump and Donald Trump Jr under the bus

Russia leaks emails incriminating them both


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