3:04 PM 10/26/2017 – Russia’s worrisome push…

Saved Stories – Trump Investigations

Saved Stories – Trump Investigations
Trump anxiety – Google News: Trump solidifies his grip on GOP with the exits of Flake, Corker – AZCentral.com
trump under federal investigation – Google News: White House: Trump to declare opioid crisis a public health emergency – The Hill
Donald Trump | The Guardian: Trump to declare health emergency over opioids but no new funds to help
Trump Investigations Report: 9:49 AM 10/26/2017 More than 2 months after declaring an opioid crisis, Trump appears to have decided how to proceed Mic
Donald Trump: Donald Trump Throws U.S. Generals Under The Bus In Regard To Niger Attack
Trump – Google News: Trump to Declare Opioid Crisis a ‘Public Health Emergency’ – New York Times
Trump Investigations Report: 10:54 AM 10/26/2017 Trump Throws U.S. Generals Under The Bus
Comey – Google News: Howard University Activists Say School Banned Them From James Comey Lecture – News One
Trump Investigations Report: 11:06 AM 10/26/2017 The Recruitables: Why Trumps Team Was Easy Prey for Putin Politico
trump and russia – Google News: What Is Collusion? Clinton And Trump Russia Scandals Explained – Newsweek
Twitter bans Kremlin-backed outlets RT and Sputnik from advertising over election meddling – USA TODAY
Twitter Bans Russia’s RT and Sputnik From Advertising Following US Election Probe – Variety
Twitter bans ads from Russian-sponsored news sites – CNET
Russian Intelligence services – Google News: How Robert Mueller’s investigation could end – The Economist
11:25 AM 10/26/2017 The Recruitables: Why Trumps Team Was Easy Prey for Putin
trump psychological assessment – Google News: These Politicians Knew Donald Trump Was Going Crazy Before We Did – The Cheat Sheet
Donald Trump | The Guardian: Late-night hosts call Trump ‘the crazy old guy yelling on his front lawn’
Google Avoids Spotlight During Russia Investigation – Newsmax
russia helping trump – Google News: Clinton lawyer linked to Russia dossier not allowed to testify at Menendez trial – New York Post
Trump – Google News: Trump again tweets on Virginia’s governor’s race, says Gillespie will protect our great statues/heritage – Washington Post
donald trump racketeering – Google News: Founder of opioid maker Insys indicted for fraud, racketeering – Financial Times
Twitter bans ads from two Russian media outlets, cites election meddling – Reuters
Trump’s and Putin’s connections with organized crime – Google News: New meaning for ‘Russian leaks’ – Durango Telegraph
trump criminal investigation – Google News: Endangering the Country; Devin Nunes Edition – TPM (blog)
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2:13 PM 10/26/2017 – Assange confirmed…

Saved Stories – Trump Investigations

Saved Stories – Trump Investigations
Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Today’s Headlines and Commentary
putin won US 2016 election – Google News: Twitter bans ads from Kremlin-funded RT and Sputnik, but they can still tweet – Los Angeles Times
Donald Trump: Stephen Colbert Imagines The Outcome Had Obama Given Press Conferences Like Trump
roger stone – Google News: Trump ally Roger Stone denies collusion with Russia – TRT World
Donald Trump: Seth Meyers Slams GOP For Being Engulfed In A Civil War Of Its Own Making
2016 elections and mental health – Google News: The Identity-Politics Death Grip – National Review
2016 elections anxiety – Google News: The Identity-Politics Death Grip – National Review
Trump and the Mob – Google News: Catherine Rampell: Donald Trump, our first millennial president – Chippewa Herald
Trump FBI file – Google News: FOX NEWS FIRST: Ex-FBI informant cleared to testify about Obama-era uranium Russia deal; Law broken in Clinton … – Fox News
trump authoritarianism – Google News: America’s military won’t save us from Trump’s fascism – Salon
1. Trump Circles: Elections from mikenova (16 sites): Putin Trump – Google News: The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin – Politico
1. Trump Circles: Elections from mikenova (16 sites): felix sater – Google News: The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin – Politico
felix sater – Google News: The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin – Politico
trump and intelligence community – Google News: Trump taps JFK files to distract from the file Mueller is building – The Olympian
Donald Trump – Google News: Donald Trump, Fats Domino, Houston Astros: Your Thursday Briefing – New York Times
Senate Committee Escalates Russia Probe, Digs Into Finances Of Nearly 40 Individuals And Businesses – BuzzFeed News
roger stone – Google News: Trips to Mexico City, plots to kill Castro: What the JFK records are likely to reveal – New York Daily News
calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News: Who Knew Trump Would Be a Weak President? – New Republic
trump and intelligence community – Google News: A Chance to Control Domestic Spying – New Republic
trump russian candidate – Google News: The Trump wing of the GOP is winning battles. But will it lose the war to keep the Senate in Republican hands? – Los Angeles Times
Russian Facebook ads made no difference in the election – Standard-Examiner
Trump Investigations Report: 6:51 AM 10/26/2017 Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. The Washington Post
Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Getting Encryption onto the Front Burner
Trump’s and Putin’s connections with organized crime – Google News: Fights in Russia: Putin’s Acolytes Are Determined to Crush Navalny’s Opposition, One Activist at a Time – Newsweek
trump russian candidate – Google News: Orange County is turning blue. Can Dana Rohrabacher survive his chumminess with Trump? – Los Angeles Times

 

Saved Stories – Trump Investigations
Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Today’s Headlines and Commentary

On Wednesday, Wikileaks leader Julian Assange confirmed that the head of a data analytics firm working with Trumps campaign contacted Assange last year, the Daily Beast reports. Alexander Nix, the head of Cambridge Analytica, admitted that he sent an email to Assange seeking to assist Wikileaks in finding and releasing Clintons 33,000 missing emails. According to unnamed sources, Assange declined the request. This connection is the closest reported between Wikileaks and the Trump campaign during a time when Trump fervently admonished Clinton and publicly requested Russias help to recover Clintons lost emails.Sen. Bob Corker, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee,  articulated his frustration with the Trump administration on Wednesday over the administration missing its Oct. 1 deadline to implement Russia sanctions, according to Politico. Trump signed the bipartisan sanctions bill in August, but his administration has yet to penalize certain Russian entities. Sens. John McCain and Ben Cardin have also expressed concern over the sanctions delay. Corker notably did not accuse the administration of purposeful delay, but intends to check into it.

Marine Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, arrived in Seoul on Thursday for his annual meeting with South Korean military officials, the Washington Post reports. Dunford will discuss, among other things, improving South Koreas ballistic missiles and upgrading their military networks. Defense Secretary James Mattis will head to Seoul next week following Dunfords departure.

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahls sentencing proceedings continued yesterday with emotional testimony from James Hatch, a former Navy SEAL whose military service dog was killed in a mission to retrieve Bergdahl, according to the Washington Post. Hatchs testimony is part of an ongoing process to determine whether the consequences, often deadly, that followed Bergdahls abandonment of his post should factor into the sergeant’s punishment. Hatch, who suffered career-ending injuries during the mission, delivered the tattered harness of his deceased military dog as evidence in the sentencing proceedings.

In an interview with several U.S. publications, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi urged the U.S. and Iran not to involve Iraq in growing conflicts over the nuclear deal and U.S. sanctions, the Wall Street Journal reports. Abadi reiterated his support for U.S. forces in Iraq fighting the Islamic State group, but that any attacks on coalition forces in Iraq, including those that U.S. officials believe are Iran proxies, would be considered an attack on Iraq, on the sovereignty of Iraq, the sovereignty of the state.

President Donald Trump admitted that he did not authorize the mission in Niger resulting in the deaths of four U.S. special forces members, according to the Hill. Trump stated that his generals had the authority, clarifying that he gave them authority to do whats right so that we win. On Monday, Gen. Dunford said that the soldiers were on a reconnaissance mission that did not require the presidents authority.

 

ICYMI, Yesterday on Lawfare

Ashley Deeks, Sabrina McCubbin and Cody Poplin considered what the U.S. could learn from Cold War anti-propaganda strategies.

Ian Hurd discussed why both liberal and realist theorists incorrectly interpret the international  laws of war.

The Lawfare Editors flagged the next Hoover Book Soiree with Susan Landau on Nov. 1.

Bobby Chesney and Steve Vladeck posted this weeks National Security Law podcast.

Garrett Hinck summarized the European Commissions privacy shield review.

Matthew Kahn posted the live stream of a House hearing on the risk that Kaspersky Labs products pose to the federal government.

Kahn also posted the Oct. 24 executive order to resume the U.S. refugee admissions program.

 

Email the Roundup Team noteworthy law and security-related articles to include, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook for additional commentary on these issues. Sign up to receive Lawfare in your inbox. Visit ourEvents Calendar to learn about upcoming national security events, and check out relevant job openings on ourJob Board.

 Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices

putin won US 2016 election – Google News: Twitter bans ads from Kremlin-funded RT and Sputnik, but they can still tweet – Los Angeles Times
 


Los Angeles Times
Twitter bans ads from Kremlin-funded RT and Sputnik, but they can still tweet
Los Angeles Times
Twitter Inc. said Thursday that it will no longer accept advertising from Sputnik and Russia Today, pointing to the U.S.intelligence community’s conclusion that the two Kremlin-funded news organizations were part a Russian government operation to 
Twitter Is Banning Ads From Russian Media Outlets RT And Sputnik Because Of Election MeddlingBuzzFeed Newsall 75 news articles »

 putin won US 2016 election – Google News

Donald Trump: Stephen Colbert Imagines The Outcome Had Obama Given Press Conferences Like Trump

“Remember when Barack Obama would go on TV to brag about being able to read a name off a chart?”

 Donald Trump

roger stone – Google News: Trump ally Roger Stone denies collusion with Russia – TRT World
 

Trump ally Roger Stone denies collusion with Russia
TRT World
Republican political consultant Roger Stone, a longtime ally of President Donald Trump, flatly denied allegations of collusion between the president’s associates and Russia during the 2016 US election in a meeting with lawmakers on Tuesday. In a 47and more »

 roger stone – Google News

Donald Trump: Seth Meyers Slams GOP For Being Engulfed In A Civil War Of Its Own Making

The late-night host called out Republican senators for failing to take concrete actions to stop President Trump.

 Donald Trump

2016 elections and mental health – Google News: The Identity-Politics Death Grip – National Review
 


National Review
The Identity-Politics Death Grip
National Review
Last June, despite being outspent by nearly $10 million, Republican Karen Handel won Georgia’s sixth congressional district in a special election to fill the vacancy left when Tom Price became secretary of Health and Human Services (a position from and more »

 2016 elections and mental health – Google News

2016 elections anxiety – Google News: The Identity-Politics Death Grip – National Review
 


National Review
The Identity-Politics Death Grip
National Review
The voting map of the 2016 election, with its vast expanse of Trump-supporting counties, suggests how pervasive this anxietyis. Once, the Democrats were the party of the middle class, attentive to how it might be lifted up or at least, kept from and more »

 2016 elections anxiety – Google News

Trump and the Mob – Google News: Catherine Rampell: Donald Trump, our first millennial president – Chippewa Herald
 


Chippewa Herald
Catherine Rampell: Donald Trump, our first millennial president
Chippewa Herald
During the presidential campaign Trump encouraged mob violence against critics, and pledged to open up our libel laws against journalists covering him. Since taking office, he has attempted to use government power to turn the entire country into his …and more »

 Trump and the Mob – Google News

Trump FBI file – Google News: FOX NEWS FIRST: Ex-FBI informant cleared to testify about Obama-era uranium Russia deal; Law broken in Clinton … – Fox News
 


Fox News
FOX NEWS FIRST: Ex-FBI informant cleared to testify about Obama-era uranium Russia deal; Law broken in Clinton …
Fox News
WHAT’S INSIDE JFK FILES? The classified files on the assassination of former President John F. Kennedy will be released today, President Trump announced on Twitter … The move to release the government documents on the 1963 assassination could …
DOJ gives FBI informant green light to testify on Russian uranium effortsCNNall 460 news articles »

 Trump FBI file – Google News

trump authoritarianism – Google News: America’s military won’t save us from Trump’s fascism – Salon
 


Salon
America’s military won’t save us from Trump’s fascism
Salon
According to a new survey from the Military Times, it appears that despite Donald Trump’s disdain for American democracy and his embrace of authoritarian and fascist principles, he enjoys a high amount of support among the country’s enlisted ranks:.

and more »

 trump authoritarianism – Google News

1. Trump Circles: Elections from mikenova (16 sites): Putin Trump – Google News: The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin – Politico
 


Politico
The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin
Politico
By now, it should be clear to anyone following the news that Russian intelligence made a formidable effort to approach theTrump campaign and assess the potential to manipulate its members. As a former officer of the CIA’s Directorate of Operations, I  

 Putin Trump – Google News

 1. Trump Circles: Elections from mikenova (16 sites)

1. Trump Circles: Elections from mikenova (16 sites): felix sater – Google News: The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin – Politico
 


Politico
The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin
Politico
He tries to create the impression of someone who is extremely well-connected and very busy, a source who had worked withSater told Ioffe. Sater made a few forays into Moscow business circles, but could never convert and was unable to win the trust  

 felix sater – Google News

 1. Trump Circles: Elections from mikenova (16 sites)

felix sater – Google News: The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin – Politico
 


Politico
The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin
Politico
He tries to create the impression of someone who is extremely well-connected and very busy, a source who had worked withSater told Ioffe. Sater made a few forays into Moscow business circles, but could never convert and was unable to win the trust  

 felix sater – Google News

trump and intelligence community – Google News: Trump taps JFK files to distract from the file Mueller is building – The Olympian
 

Trump taps JFK files to distract from the file Mueller is building
The Olympian
Releasing these files allows President Trump yet again to distract the nation from his inability to govern effectively. Further, it gives him another shot at undermining an American intelligence community he deeply distrusts by exposing CIA and FBI and more »

 trump and intelligence community – Google News

Donald Trump – Google News: Donald Trump, Fats Domino, Houston Astros: Your Thursday Briefing – New York Times
 


New York Times
Donald Trump, Fats Domino, Houston Astros: Your Thursday Briefing
New York Times
Our chief White House correspondent, Peter Baker, reports: This past summer, the Trump administration debated lowering the annual cap on refugees admitted to the United States. Should it stay at 110,000, be cut to 50,000 or fall somewhere in between?and more »

 Donald Trump – Google News

Senate Committee Escalates Russia Probe, Digs Into Finances Of Nearly 40 Individuals And Businesses – BuzzFeed News
 


BuzzFeed News
Senate Committee Escalates Russia Probe, Digs Into Finances Of Nearly 40 Individuals And Businesses
BuzzFeed News
A congressional committee investigating Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election has stepped up its probe over the past month, requesting that an agency that combats financial crime turn over confidential banking information on nearly 40 …and more »

roger stone – Google News: Trips to Mexico City, plots to kill Castro: What the JFK records are likely to reveal – New York Daily News
 


New York Daily News
Trips to Mexico City, plots to kill Castro: What the JFK records are likely to reveal
New York Daily News
Roger Stone, the longtime political adviser, told the Washington Examiner this week he convinced Trump to release the documents. Stone, who isn’t known to be related to Oliver Stone, once authored a book alleging Lyndon Johnson had Kennedy killed so …
What JFK assassination documents tell us about 1960s MiamiTampabay.com
On JFK documents, Trump squeezed over disclosureABC News
The JFK Files: More Than 50 Years of Questions, ConspiraciesVoice of America
Washington Post –CNN –The Week Magazine –Twitter
all 148 news articles »

 roger stone – Google News

calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News: Who Knew Trump Would Be a Weak President? – New Republic
 


New Republic
Who Knew Trump Would Be a Weak President?
New Republic
At his rallies, presidential candidate Donald Trump excited his most avid supporters through displays of toughness: his callswhen a demonstrator acted up to get him out of here; his incantations of his reality show signature You’re fired; his and more »

 calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News

trump and intelligence community – Google News: A Chance to Control Domestic Spying – New Republic
 


VICE News
A Chance to Control Domestic Spying
New Republic
In his first year in office, Donald Trump has achieved the seemingly impossible: By variously criticizing Barack Obama’s surveillance practices and promising to ramp up his own, he has managed to galvanize a bipartisan movement in Congress to curb the 
Senators want to reform a surveillance law before Trump renews itVICE News
Bipartisan Coalition Introduces USA RIGHTS Act to Reform Secretive Warrantless Spy Program | Press Releases | U.S. …Senator Ron Wyden
Senate Intelligence Committee Draft 702 Reauthorization Bill – LawfareLawfareall 89 news articles »

 trump and intelligence community – Google News

trump russian candidate – Google News: The Trump wing of the GOP is winning battles. But will it lose the war to keep the Senate in Republican hands? – Los Angeles Times
 


Los Angeles Times
The Trump wing of the GOP is winning battles. But will it lose the war to keep the Senate in Republican hands?
Los Angeles Times
Sen. Jeff Flake’s surprise decision against seeking reelection marked a major victory for Stephen K. Bannon and his pirate band of Republicans. But the larger question Wednesday was whether the insurgency will cost the GOP its thin majority on Capitol 
The unfair criticism that Sen. Flake’s anti-Trumpism speech was too little, too lateWashington Post
Flake drops out of Senate race, torches Trump in speechThe Hill
The liberal-left divide reshaping American politicsThe Guardianall 4,085 news articles »

 trump russian candidate – Google News

Russian Facebook ads made no difference in the election – Standard-Examiner
 


OregonLive.com
Russian Facebook ads made no difference in the election
Standard-Examiner
The Trump campaign spent around $90 million on digital in 2016. Hillary Clinton employed a … If the Russians are going to decide our elections on social media, one assumes it will require at least a little originality. One suspicion has been that the 
Lowry: US democracy not for sale to RussiaBoston Herald
Rich Lowry: The Facebook farceOregonLive.comall 16 news articles »

Trump Investigations Report: 6:51 AM 10/26/2017 Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. The Washington Post

10.26.17 Russia-NATO Council To Discuss Ukraine, Afghanistan Report: Putin’s ‘Inner Circle’ Worth Nearly $24 Billion Reagan’s Son: Donald Trump Is A ‘Danger To The World’ And Must Be Removed | HuffPost Why Clinton Camp’s Funding of the Trump Dossier Matters – Bloomberg Julian Assange Says WikiLeaks Rejected Request From Trump-Linked Firm | HuffPost Donald Trump … Continue reading“6:51 AM 10/26/2017 – Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. – The Washington Post” Trump Investigations Report
Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Getting Encryption onto the Front Burner

Im happy to be wrong, but I dont expect the Deputy Attorney Generals recent speech to spark productive engagement in the standoff over encryption. Federal, state and local authorities will keep highlighting their increasing inability to obtain critical data (in motion and at rest) by means of legal process and will try to demonstrate the critical public safety price they (meaning we) pay for warrant-proof platforms. Tech firms, for their part, will continue to focus on customer and shareholder value, which is both completely natural and consistent with widespread libertarian preferences in that sector. Recent calls for a congressional commissionusually a tactic for kicking a can down the roadappear to have receded. Apparently a decision has been made that this can will kick itself.In the meantime, the range of data and communications inaccessible to law enforcement and other regulators without the cooperation of customers and users will increase by leaps and bounds. We are fast moving from a world in which both the platform provider and the customer could access data to one where only the customer can. Its not just that Apple moved from an iPhone operating system that allowed the company to retrieve data from the device to one for which only the customer has the key, or that end-to-end encrypted messaging platforms like WhatsApp have become common. Its also the steady move to customer-controlled cloud encryption. Smartphone and user data that used to be backed up to cloudreducing, though not eliminating enforcers need to access the devicewill still be in cloud, but with access controlled by the consumer. The corporate data previously stored on company owned and controlled services, and thereafter moved to the cloud, will continue to reside these, but cloud providers will soon disable themselves from accessing it, even during computation.

We are thus moving to a world in which customers and users of all stripes become the exclusive gatekeepers of their own data and communications. For a range of customers and users, this state of affairs may not impede the many public safety and regulatory projects we rely on government to pursue. When presented with a warrant or other appropriate legal process, many firms and individuals will comply. Investigators, particularly in white collar investigations, frequently use subpoenae rather than search warrants, working through lawyers and firms and trusting that those on whom they serve process will comply. But when pursuing not just terrorism, violent crime, and child exploitation cases, but also many white collar ones, law enforcers justifiably lack this trust, and regularly fear the obstruction that ensues when a data request tips a target off, or some combination of partial compliance and deletion.

In an effort to avoid refighting the Crypto Wars, and recognizing the value of innovation and the problem with top-down mandates, Rosenstein, like former FBI Director James Comey, took pains not to demand any particular solution, looking only for some key management technique or other arrangement that the government could require the provider to draw on. Such access already exists when a providers business model requires a product to have itfor, say, key recovery (for devices), content scanning, or updatesand the Justice Department wants this to occur even absent that business model.

Perhaps because neither this White House nor Congress is ready to do anything, the DAG didnt quite call for legislation or regulation. Indeed, he quickly limited his proposal only to mass-market consumer devices and services that enable warrant-proof encryption by default and was pretty vague about how even those platforms would be addressed. He doubtless hopes that this move will spark some sort of voluntary compliance by industrythe specific consideration of public safety and other social costs.

If history is any guide, however, only actual legislative or regulatory proposals will spark constructive engagement. Signals from the Obama White House that the private sector took as meaning legislation was off the table helped ensure that nothing happened during the past administration. But one has only to look to the story of the Symphony messaging platform to see the effect of credible threats. When, soon after the prosecution of several banks for a foreign exchange bid-rigging conspiracy accomplished through chatroom conversations, a consortium of several large financial institutions started their own platform that touted end-to-end encryption and “guaranteed data deletion, New York States Department of Financial Services used its considerable regulatory power to intervene and demand that Symphony retain message data for seven years and that individual banks agreed to store decryption keys for the messages with independent custodians. They agreed, and Symphony flourishes, backed by a number of investors, including Google.

As my colleague Steve Bellovin regularly reminds me, crypto is hard, and any efforts to engineer access in the public interest might well add cybersecurity risks beyond those facedand rarely eliminatedby firms trying to engineer systems for their own purposes. Yet I would expect firms to build and deliver only those products their engineers tell them can be made securely and within the context of their own processes. And I question why we should normalize the risks firms take as they roll out products to serve their customers while problematizing those they would face if they were required to take social costs into account. Proofs of concepts for addressing the engineering challenges are beginning to circulate, and need to be carefully considered, even if they are not perceived as singular or complete solutions to these complex challenges.

The systems design challenges are even greater because of the international dimensions of any voluntary or compelled regime of exceptional access. Regulating devices sold around the world alone would be hard enough, as we need to consider the competitive disadvantage a U.S. mandate would place on firms. But at least obtaining data from a device with lawful process can be limited to the jurisdiction with control of that device. This is why, although the deputy attorney general lumped access to stored data on devices with access to in-flight encrypted real-time communications and messaging, progress (legislative or otherwise) may require dealing with the two on separate tracks. For no such restrictive principle can easily organize which jurisdiction has access to data in motion or data in a delocalized cloud.

Yet the international dimensions of the challenge are actually a reason for engagement, not forbearance. Consider the current state of play: Chinas encryption policy has been inexorably movingtoward mandated government access. To be sure, we dont look to China to set normative standards for balancing privacy and cybersecurity with public safety and other asserted public interests. But tech firms have been increasingly ready to accommodate Chinas sovereign demands, and there is no reason to expect that forbearance by the U.S. will be matched by forbearance by the Chinese Government, which has not been looking to the U.S. for guidance on cyberpolicy. And its not just China that is demanding full access to the data use and traffic of its citizens. Nor just Russia. In the United Kingdom, the Investigatory Powers Act allows the government to serve technical capability notices to obtain plaintext. Proposals for exceptional access legislation seem to be moving forward in Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Germany and France have asked for EU legislation. To be sure, the impact of this legislative wave cant yet be discerned, and the extent to which firms will actually be forced to engineer a solution to allow them access customer data, regardless of their current architecture, remains unclear. But trend is there, and one or more of these nations are surely an incident or two away from that.

Its a mistake to paint increasing governmental regulatory demands as simply the product of the security state. In liberal democracies, they are efforts to protect liberal values. Just as jurisdictions impose data protection rules on data flows to advance the autonomy of citizens, so will they seek access to data as means of denying impunity to individuals and entities that seek to exercise illegitimate power. Each countryliberal or illiberalwill have its own demands. Its hard to imagine what the result of these possibly conflicting demands will be. And customer and shareholder pressure from one country may force a vendor to change its operations in another. But the problem cannot be wished away.

Nor can the problem be fairly denied by pointing to some golden age of surveillancemetadata, IoT and GPS data and the likethat the government can use instead of content. The deputy attorney general did a nice job highlighting how content matters, both to exclude and include people from suspicion. Perhaps if non-content data comes to dominate the available evidence, juries will still regularly convict. But thats hardly a future to embrace.

Then there are those who think governmental hacking can substitute for a regime of authorized access. Its certainly true that on both the intelligence and the criminal investigation sides, the government will indeed work to identify and exploit vulnerabilities. But these methods cannot always be counted on. And those who would make them the primary recourse for federal, state and local authorities seeking to investigate criminal activity need to consider the implications of that approach.

A private market for hacking already exists. Do we want it to swell with the demands of federal, state and local authorities? Do we want a world in which an engineer (working for a company or open source) creates vulnerabilities that he can turn around and sell? We already face the risk of government hacking tools escaping. How much greater is the risk when the market expands? Moreover, if forced to rely on vulnerability exploitation, law enforcement cannot be expected to tolerate the disclosure of each tooldeveloped or boughtwhenever they bring a prosecution using its fruits. Authorities would justifiably push for a law-enforcement-sensitive version of CIPA, leaving defense lawyers to complain about their inability to fully litigate chain of custody and evidence integrity issues.

Larger issues of the governments relationships with others loom. We need more threat information sharing between government and industry, not less. But a world in which intelligence and criminal agencies need regularly to rely on vulnerability exploitation only increases the cost of sharing. Even now, one can question calls to move the Vulnerabilities Equities Process out of the White Housewhich can internalize all government intereststo Homeland Security, whose cybersecurity mission aligns it more closely to companies. Forcing law enforcers of all stripes to rely on hackingnot just to access data from the less popular platforms but from the ones that Americans most commonly usewould surely galvanize intelligence and law enforcement agencies even more against the move.

Then there is the governments relationship with its citizens. Even those troubled by the range of investigatory powers provided to law enforcement should prefer that the powers are clearly enumerated and understood so that we have full transparency on how those powers are exercised. We should not backtrack on the long road from black bag jobs and informal data sharing to Title III surveillance warrants and other formalized investigative processes. Citizens need to know the rules and, to the greatest extent possible, be able to determine compliance with them. A world in which hacking and its accompanying opacity becomes the rule, not the exception, for obtaining encrypted data takes a large step away from that goal, at a time when we can least afford further erosion of trust in government processes at all levels.

Any legislative proposals relating to encryption made in wake of a terrorist attack or other heinous crime will surely be condemned as product of moral panic. But in the US, at least, moral panics are often simply the way long-overdue policies get enacted. We only overreact or underreact, and rarely get it right. Lets try before the panic.

 Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices

Trump’s and Putin’s connections with organized crime – Google News: Fights in Russia: Putin’s Acolytes Are Determined to Crush Navalny’s Opposition, One Activist at a Time – Newsweek
 


Newsweek
Fights in Russia: Putin’s Acolytes Are Determined to Crush Navalny’s Opposition, One Activist at a Time
Newsweek
Skripnichenko’s death is part of a surge in politically motivated violence ahead of next March’s presidential elections, in which President Vladimir Putin is expected to seek a new six-year term. Tensions have … Riot police detain demonstrators and more »

 Trump’s and Putin’s connections with organized crime – Google News

trump russian candidate – Google News: Orange County is turning blue. Can Dana Rohrabacher survive his chumminess with Trump? – Los Angeles Times
 


Los Angeles Times
Orange County is turning blue. Can Dana Rohrabacher survive his chumminess with Trump?
Los Angeles Times
Candidate Trump rejected the sunny, libertarian-inflected conservatism of Ronald Reagan and steered the Republican Party toward a vulgar, anti-immigrant, anti-free-market populism. The approach helped get him into the White House. … A longtime 

 trump russian candidate – Google News

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11:06 AM 10/26/2017 – The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin – Politico

Saved Stories – Trump Investigations

Saved Stories – Trump Investigations
Donald Trump: Stephen Colbert Imagines The Outcome Had Obama Given Press Conferences Like Trump
roger stone – Google News: Trump ally Roger Stone denies collusion with Russia – TRT World
Donald Trump: Seth Meyers Slams GOP For Being Engulfed In A Civil War Of Its Own Making
2016 elections and mental health – Google News: The Identity-Politics Death Grip – National Review
2016 elections anxiety – Google News: The Identity-Politics Death Grip – National Review
Trump and the Mob – Google News: Catherine Rampell: Donald Trump, our first millennial president – Chippewa Herald
Trump FBI file – Google News: FOX NEWS FIRST: Ex-FBI informant cleared to testify about Obama-era uranium Russia deal; Law broken in Clinton … – Fox News
trump authoritarianism – Google News: America’s military won’t save us from Trump’s fascism – Salon
1. Trump Circles: Elections from mikenova (16 sites): felix sater – Google News: The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin – Politico
felix sater – Google News: The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin – Politico
trump and intelligence community – Google News: Trump taps JFK files to distract from the file Mueller is building – The Olympian
Donald Trump – Google News: Donald Trump, Fats Domino, Houston Astros: Your Thursday Briefing – New York Times
Senate Committee Escalates Russia Probe, Digs Into Finances Of Nearly 40 Individuals And Businesses – BuzzFeed News
roger stone – Google News: Trips to Mexico City, plots to kill Castro: What the JFK records are likely to reveal – New York Daily News
calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News: Who Knew Trump Would Be a Weak President? – New Republic
trump and intelligence community – Google News: A Chance to Control Domestic Spying – New Republic
trump russian candidate – Google News: The Trump wing of the GOP is winning battles. But will it lose the war to keep the Senate in Republican hands? – Los Angeles Times
Russian Facebook ads made no difference in the election – Standard-Examiner
Trump Investigations Report: 6:51 AM 10/26/2017 Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. The Washington Post
Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Getting Encryption onto the Front Burner
Trump’s and Putin’s connections with organized crime – Google News: Fights in Russia: Putin’s Acolytes Are Determined to Crush Navalny’s Opposition, One Activist at a Time – Newsweek
trump russian candidate – Google News: Orange County is turning blue. Can Dana Rohrabacher survive his chumminess with Trump? – Los Angeles Times
Trump Investigations Report: 7:04 AM 10/26/2017 Who is Bill Browder? by Seth Hettena
Russian Intelligence services – Google News: America Asleep at the Keyboard as Cyber Warfare Gets Real – Freepress Online

 

Saved Stories – Trump Investigations
Donald Trump: Stephen Colbert Imagines The Outcome Had Obama Given Press Conferences Like Trump

“Remember when Barack Obama would go on TV to brag about being able to read a name off a chart?”

 Donald Trump

roger stone – Google News: Trump ally Roger Stone denies collusion with Russia – TRT World
 

Trump ally Roger Stone denies collusion with Russia
TRT World
Republican political consultant Roger Stone, a longtime ally of President Donald Trump, flatly denied allegations of collusion between the president’s associates and Russia during the 2016 US election in a meeting with lawmakers on Tuesday. In a 47and more »

 roger stone – Google News

Donald Trump: Seth Meyers Slams GOP For Being Engulfed In A Civil War Of Its Own Making

The late-night host called out Republican senators for failing to take concrete actions to stop President Trump.

 Donald Trump

2016 elections and mental health – Google News: The Identity-Politics Death Grip – National Review
 


National Review
The Identity-Politics Death Grip
National Review
Last June, despite being outspent by nearly $10 million, Republican Karen Handel won Georgia’s sixth congressional district in a special election to fill the vacancy left when Tom Price became secretary of Health and Human Services (a position from and more »

 2016 elections and mental health – Google News

2016 elections anxiety – Google News: The Identity-Politics Death Grip – National Review
 


National Review
The Identity-Politics Death Grip
National Review
The voting map of the 2016 election, with its vast expanse of Trump-supporting counties, suggests how pervasive this anxietyis. Once, the Democrats were the party of the middle class, attentive to how it might be lifted up or at least, kept from and more »

 2016 elections anxiety – Google News

Trump and the Mob – Google News: Catherine Rampell: Donald Trump, our first millennial president – Chippewa Herald
 


Chippewa Herald
Catherine Rampell: Donald Trump, our first millennial president
Chippewa Herald
During the presidential campaign Trump encouraged mob violence against critics, and pledged to open up our libel laws against journalists covering him. Since taking office, he has attempted to use government power to turn the entire country into his …and more »

 Trump and the Mob – Google News

Trump FBI file – Google News: FOX NEWS FIRST: Ex-FBI informant cleared to testify about Obama-era uranium Russia deal; Law broken in Clinton … – Fox News
 


Fox News
FOX NEWS FIRST: Ex-FBI informant cleared to testify about Obama-era uranium Russia deal; Law broken in Clinton …
Fox News
WHAT’S INSIDE JFK FILES? The classified files on the assassination of former President John F. Kennedy will be released today, President Trump announced on Twitter … The move to release the government documents on the 1963 assassination could …
DOJ gives FBI informant green light to testify on Russian uranium effortsCNNall 460 news articles »

 Trump FBI file – Google News

trump authoritarianism – Google News: America’s military won’t save us from Trump’s fascism – Salon
 


Salon
America’s military won’t save us from Trump’s fascism
Salon
According to a new survey from the Military Times, it appears that despite Donald Trump’s disdain for American democracy and his embrace of authoritarian and fascist principles, he enjoys a high amount of support among the country’s enlisted ranks:.

and more »

 trump authoritarianism – Google News

1. Trump Circles: Elections from mikenova (16 sites): Putin Trump – Google News: The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin – Politico
 


Politico
The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin
Politico
By now, it should be clear to anyone following the news that Russian intelligence made a formidable effort to approach theTrump campaign and assess the potential to manipulate its members. As a former officer of the CIA’s Directorate of Operations, I  

 Putin Trump – Google News

 1. Trump Circles: Elections from mikenova (16 sites)

1. Trump Circles: Elections from mikenova (16 sites): felix sater – Google News: The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin – Politico
 


Politico
The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin
Politico
He tries to create the impression of someone who is extremely well-connected and very busy, a source who had worked withSater told Ioffe. Sater made a few forays into Moscow business circles, but could never convert and was unable to win the trust  

 felix sater – Google News

 1. Trump Circles: Elections from mikenova (16 sites)

felix sater – Google News: The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin – Politico
 


Politico
The Recruitables: Why Trump’s Team Was Easy Prey for Putin
Politico
He tries to create the impression of someone who is extremely well-connected and very busy, a source who had worked withSater told Ioffe. Sater made a few forays into Moscow business circles, but could never convert and was unable to win the trust  

 felix sater – Google News

trump and intelligence community – Google News: Trump taps JFK files to distract from the file Mueller is building – The Olympian
 

Trump taps JFK files to distract from the file Mueller is building
The Olympian
Releasing these files allows President Trump yet again to distract the nation from his inability to govern effectively. Further, it gives him another shot at undermining an American intelligence community he deeply distrusts by exposing CIA and FBI and more »

 trump and intelligence community – Google News

Donald Trump – Google News: Donald Trump, Fats Domino, Houston Astros: Your Thursday Briefing – New York Times
 


New York Times
Donald Trump, Fats Domino, Houston Astros: Your Thursday Briefing
New York Times
Our chief White House correspondent, Peter Baker, reports: This past summer, the Trump administration debated lowering the annual cap on refugees admitted to the United States. Should it stay at 110,000, be cut to 50,000 or fall somewhere in between?and more »

 Donald Trump – Google News

Senate Committee Escalates Russia Probe, Digs Into Finances Of Nearly 40 Individuals And Businesses – BuzzFeed News
 


BuzzFeed News
Senate Committee Escalates Russia Probe, Digs Into Finances Of Nearly 40 Individuals And Businesses
BuzzFeed News
A congressional committee investigating Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election has stepped up its probe over the past month, requesting that an agency that combats financial crime turn over confidential banking information on nearly 40 …and more »

roger stone – Google News: Trips to Mexico City, plots to kill Castro: What the JFK records are likely to reveal – New York Daily News
 


New York Daily News
Trips to Mexico City, plots to kill Castro: What the JFK records are likely to reveal
New York Daily News
Roger Stone, the longtime political adviser, told the Washington Examiner this week he convinced Trump to release the documents. Stone, who isn’t known to be related to Oliver Stone, once authored a book alleging Lyndon Johnson had Kennedy killed so …
What JFK assassination documents tell us about 1960s MiamiTampabay.com
On JFK documents, Trump squeezed over disclosureABC News
The JFK Files: More Than 50 Years of Questions, ConspiraciesVoice of America
Washington Post –CNN –The Week Magazine –Twitter
all 148 news articles »

 roger stone – Google News

calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News: Who Knew Trump Would Be a Weak President? – New Republic
 


New Republic
Who Knew Trump Would Be a Weak President?
New Republic
At his rallies, presidential candidate Donald Trump excited his most avid supporters through displays of toughness: his callswhen a demonstrator acted up to get him out of here; his incantations of his reality show signature You’re fired; his and more »

 calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News

trump and intelligence community – Google News: A Chance to Control Domestic Spying – New Republic
 


VICE News
A Chance to Control Domestic Spying
New Republic
In his first year in office, Donald Trump has achieved the seemingly impossible: By variously criticizing Barack Obama’s surveillance practices and promising to ramp up his own, he has managed to galvanize a bipartisan movement in Congress to curb the 
Senators want to reform a surveillance law before Trump renews itVICE News
Bipartisan Coalition Introduces USA RIGHTS Act to Reform Secretive Warrantless Spy Program | Press Releases | U.S. …Senator Ron Wyden
Senate Intelligence Committee Draft 702 Reauthorization Bill – LawfareLawfareall 89 news articles »

 trump and intelligence community – Google News

trump russian candidate – Google News: The Trump wing of the GOP is winning battles. But will it lose the war to keep the Senate in Republican hands? – Los Angeles Times
 


Los Angeles Times
The Trump wing of the GOP is winning battles. But will it lose the war to keep the Senate in Republican hands?
Los Angeles Times
Sen. Jeff Flake’s surprise decision against seeking reelection marked a major victory for Stephen K. Bannon and his pirate band of Republicans. But the larger question Wednesday was whether the insurgency will cost the GOP its thin majority on Capitol 
The unfair criticism that Sen. Flake’s anti-Trumpism speech was too little, too lateWashington Post
Flake drops out of Senate race, torches Trump in speechThe Hill
The liberal-left divide reshaping American politicsThe Guardianall 4,085 news articles »

 trump russian candidate – Google News

Russian Facebook ads made no difference in the election – Standard-Examiner
 


OregonLive.com
Russian Facebook ads made no difference in the election
Standard-Examiner
The Trump campaign spent around $90 million on digital in 2016. Hillary Clinton employed a … If the Russians are going to decide our elections on social media, one assumes it will require at least a little originality. One suspicion has been that the 
Lowry: US democracy not for sale to RussiaBoston Herald
Rich Lowry: The Facebook farceOregonLive.comall 16 news articles »

Trump Investigations Report: 6:51 AM 10/26/2017 Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. The Washington Post

10.26.17 Russia-NATO Council To Discuss Ukraine, Afghanistan Report: Putin’s ‘Inner Circle’ Worth Nearly $24 Billion Reagan’s Son: Donald Trump Is A ‘Danger To The World’ And Must Be Removed | HuffPost Why Clinton Camp’s Funding of the Trump Dossier Matters – Bloomberg Julian Assange Says WikiLeaks Rejected Request From Trump-Linked Firm | HuffPost Donald Trump … Continue reading“6:51 AM 10/26/2017 – Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. – The Washington Post” Trump Investigations Report
Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Getting Encryption onto the Front Burner

Im happy to be wrong, but I dont expect the Deputy Attorney Generals recent speech to spark productive engagement in the standoff over encryption. Federal, state and local authorities will keep highlighting their increasing inability to obtain critical data (in motion and at rest) by means of legal process and will try to demonstrate the critical public safety price they (meaning we) pay for warrant-proof platforms. Tech firms, for their part, will continue to focus on customer and shareholder value, which is both completely natural and consistent with widespread libertarian preferences in that sector. Recent calls for a congressional commissionusually a tactic for kicking a can down the roadappear to have receded. Apparently a decision has been made that this can will kick itself.In the meantime, the range of data and communications inaccessible to law enforcement and other regulators without the cooperation of customers and users will increase by leaps and bounds. We are fast moving from a world in which both the platform provider and the customer could access data to one where only the customer can. Its not just that Apple moved from an iPhone operating system that allowed the company to retrieve data from the device to one for which only the customer has the key, or that end-to-end encrypted messaging platforms like WhatsApp have become common. Its also the steady move to customer-controlled cloud encryption. Smartphone and user data that used to be backed up to cloudreducing, though not eliminating enforcers need to access the devicewill still be in cloud, but with access controlled by the consumer. The corporate data previously stored on company owned and controlled services, and thereafter moved to the cloud, will continue to reside these, but cloud providers will soon disable themselves from accessing it, even during computation.

We are thus moving to a world in which customers and users of all stripes become the exclusive gatekeepers of their own data and communications. For a range of customers and users, this state of affairs may not impede the many public safety and regulatory projects we rely on government to pursue. When presented with a warrant or other appropriate legal process, many firms and individuals will comply. Investigators, particularly in white collar investigations, frequently use subpoenae rather than search warrants, working through lawyers and firms and trusting that those on whom they serve process will comply. But when pursuing not just terrorism, violent crime, and child exploitation cases, but also many white collar ones, law enforcers justifiably lack this trust, and regularly fear the obstruction that ensues when a data request tips a target off, or some combination of partial compliance and deletion.

In an effort to avoid refighting the Crypto Wars, and recognizing the value of innovation and the problem with top-down mandates, Rosenstein, like former FBI Director James Comey, took pains not to demand any particular solution, looking only for some key management technique or other arrangement that the government could require the provider to draw on. Such access already exists when a providers business model requires a product to have itfor, say, key recovery (for devices), content scanning, or updatesand the Justice Department wants this to occur even absent that business model.

Perhaps because neither this White House nor Congress is ready to do anything, the DAG didnt quite call for legislation or regulation. Indeed, he quickly limited his proposal only to mass-market consumer devices and services that enable warrant-proof encryption by default and was pretty vague about how even those platforms would be addressed. He doubtless hopes that this move will spark some sort of voluntary compliance by industrythe specific consideration of public safety and other social costs.

If history is any guide, however, only actual legislative or regulatory proposals will spark constructive engagement. Signals from the Obama White House that the private sector took as meaning legislation was off the table helped ensure that nothing happened during the past administration. But one has only to look to the story of the Symphony messaging platform to see the effect of credible threats. When, soon after the prosecution of several banks for a foreign exchange bid-rigging conspiracy accomplished through chatroom conversations, a consortium of several large financial institutions started their own platform that touted end-to-end encryption and “guaranteed data deletion, New York States Department of Financial Services used its considerable regulatory power to intervene and demand that Symphony retain message data for seven years and that individual banks agreed to store decryption keys for the messages with independent custodians. They agreed, and Symphony flourishes, backed by a number of investors, including Google.

As my colleague Steve Bellovin regularly reminds me, crypto is hard, and any efforts to engineer access in the public interest might well add cybersecurity risks beyond those facedand rarely eliminatedby firms trying to engineer systems for their own purposes. Yet I would expect firms to build and deliver only those products their engineers tell them can be made securely and within the context of their own processes. And I question why we should normalize the risks firms take as they roll out products to serve their customers while problematizing those they would face if they were required to take social costs into account. Proofs of concepts for addressing the engineering challenges are beginning to circulate, and need to be carefully considered, even if they are not perceived as singular or complete solutions to these complex challenges.

The systems design challenges are even greater because of the international dimensions of any voluntary or compelled regime of exceptional access. Regulating devices sold around the world alone would be hard enough, as we need to consider the competitive disadvantage a U.S. mandate would place on firms. But at least obtaining data from a device with lawful process can be limited to the jurisdiction with control of that device. This is why, although the deputy attorney general lumped access to stored data on devices with access to in-flight encrypted real-time communications and messaging, progress (legislative or otherwise) may require dealing with the two on separate tracks. For no such restrictive principle can easily organize which jurisdiction has access to data in motion or data in a delocalized cloud.

Yet the international dimensions of the challenge are actually a reason for engagement, not forbearance. Consider the current state of play: Chinas encryption policy has been inexorably movingtoward mandated government access. To be sure, we dont look to China to set normative standards for balancing privacy and cybersecurity with public safety and other asserted public interests. But tech firms have been increasingly ready to accommodate Chinas sovereign demands, and there is no reason to expect that forbearance by the U.S. will be matched by forbearance by the Chinese Government, which has not been looking to the U.S. for guidance on cyberpolicy. And its not just China that is demanding full access to the data use and traffic of its citizens. Nor just Russia. In the United Kingdom, the Investigatory Powers Act allows the government to serve technical capability notices to obtain plaintext. Proposals for exceptional access legislation seem to be moving forward in Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Germany and France have asked for EU legislation. To be sure, the impact of this legislative wave cant yet be discerned, and the extent to which firms will actually be forced to engineer a solution to allow them access customer data, regardless of their current architecture, remains unclear. But trend is there, and one or more of these nations are surely an incident or two away from that.

Its a mistake to paint increasing governmental regulatory demands as simply the product of the security state. In liberal democracies, they are efforts to protect liberal values. Just as jurisdictions impose data protection rules on data flows to advance the autonomy of citizens, so will they seek access to data as means of denying impunity to individuals and entities that seek to exercise illegitimate power. Each countryliberal or illiberalwill have its own demands. Its hard to imagine what the result of these possibly conflicting demands will be. And customer and shareholder pressure from one country may force a vendor to change its operations in another. But the problem cannot be wished away.

Nor can the problem be fairly denied by pointing to some golden age of surveillancemetadata, IoT and GPS data and the likethat the government can use instead of content. The deputy attorney general did a nice job highlighting how content matters, both to exclude and include people from suspicion. Perhaps if non-content data comes to dominate the available evidence, juries will still regularly convict. But thats hardly a future to embrace.

Then there are those who think governmental hacking can substitute for a regime of authorized access. Its certainly true that on both the intelligence and the criminal investigation sides, the government will indeed work to identify and exploit vulnerabilities. But these methods cannot always be counted on. And those who would make them the primary recourse for federal, state and local authorities seeking to investigate criminal activity need to consider the implications of that approach.

A private market for hacking already exists. Do we want it to swell with the demands of federal, state and local authorities? Do we want a world in which an engineer (working for a company or open source) creates vulnerabilities that he can turn around and sell? We already face the risk of government hacking tools escaping. How much greater is the risk when the market expands? Moreover, if forced to rely on vulnerability exploitation, law enforcement cannot be expected to tolerate the disclosure of each tooldeveloped or boughtwhenever they bring a prosecution using its fruits. Authorities would justifiably push for a law-enforcement-sensitive version of CIPA, leaving defense lawyers to complain about their inability to fully litigate chain of custody and evidence integrity issues.

Larger issues of the governments relationships with others loom. We need more threat information sharing between government and industry, not less. But a world in which intelligence and criminal agencies need regularly to rely on vulnerability exploitation only increases the cost of sharing. Even now, one can question calls to move the Vulnerabilities Equities Process out of the White Housewhich can internalize all government intereststo Homeland Security, whose cybersecurity mission aligns it more closely to companies. Forcing law enforcers of all stripes to rely on hackingnot just to access data from the less popular platforms but from the ones that Americans most commonly usewould surely galvanize intelligence and law enforcement agencies even more against the move.

Then there is the governments relationship with its citizens. Even those troubled by the range of investigatory powers provided to law enforcement should prefer that the powers are clearly enumerated and understood so that we have full transparency on how those powers are exercised. We should not backtrack on the long road from black bag jobs and informal data sharing to Title III surveillance warrants and other formalized investigative processes. Citizens need to know the rules and, to the greatest extent possible, be able to determine compliance with them. A world in which hacking and its accompanying opacity becomes the rule, not the exception, for obtaining encrypted data takes a large step away from that goal, at a time when we can least afford further erosion of trust in government processes at all levels.

Any legislative proposals relating to encryption made in wake of a terrorist attack or other heinous crime will surely be condemned as product of moral panic. But in the US, at least, moral panics are often simply the way long-overdue policies get enacted. We only overreact or underreact, and rarely get it right. Lets try before the panic.

 Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices

Trump’s and Putin’s connections with organized crime – Google News: Fights in Russia: Putin’s Acolytes Are Determined to Crush Navalny’s Opposition, One Activist at a Time – Newsweek
 


Newsweek
Fights in Russia: Putin’s Acolytes Are Determined to Crush Navalny’s Opposition, One Activist at a Time
Newsweek
Skripnichenko’s death is part of a surge in politically motivated violence ahead of next March’s presidential elections, in which President Vladimir Putin is expected to seek a new six-year term. Tensions have … Riot police detain demonstrators and more »

 Trump’s and Putin’s connections with organized crime – Google News

trump russian candidate – Google News: Orange County is turning blue. Can Dana Rohrabacher survive his chumminess with Trump? – Los Angeles Times
 


Los Angeles Times
Orange County is turning blue. Can Dana Rohrabacher survive his chumminess with Trump?
Los Angeles Times
Candidate Trump rejected the sunny, libertarian-inflected conservatism of Ronald Reagan and steered the Republican Party toward a vulgar, anti-immigrant, anti-free-market populism. The approach helped get him into the White House. … A longtime 

 trump russian candidate – Google News

Trump Investigations Report: 7:04 AM 10/26/2017 Who is Bill Browder? by Seth Hettena

Who is Bill Browder? (Updated) Thursday October 26th, 2017 at 6:58 AM TrumP Россия 1 Share Bill Browder This much is clear: Vladimir Putin hates Bill Browder. Browder was once the largest foreign investor in Russia and, it needs to be said, a great admirer of the Russian president. Today, he is perhaps the Putins regimes fiercest critic, and … Continue reading“7:04 AM 10/26/2017 – Who is Bill Browder? – by Seth Hettena” Trump Investigations Report
Russian Intelligence services – Google News: America Asleep at the Keyboard as Cyber Warfare Gets Real – Freepress Online
 


Freepress Online
America Asleep at the Keyboard as Cyber Warfare Gets Real
Freepress Online
In 2015, shortly after Fancy Bear was unleashed and started roaming around the DNC network, the hack was detected by the allied intelligence service monitoring Russian cyberespionage. They alerted U.S. intelligence, and the intel made its way to the and more »

 Russian Intelligence services – Google News

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10:54 AM 10/26/2017 – Trump Throws U.S. Generals Under The Bus…

Trump Investigations Report | Latest Posts

Trump Investigations Report from mikenova (18 sites)
Trump Investigations Report: 10:06 AM 10/26/2017 Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split

10:06 AM 10/26/2017 – Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump split – Google Search Thursday October 26th, 2017 at 10:00 AM Republican Party Pro-Trump Vs Anti-Trump Split – Google News 1 Share 2 Breitbart alumni just abandoned the most Pro-Trump candidate of … Vox–Oct 23, 2017 Kelli Ward, the Republican primary challenger to Sen. … Continue reading“10:06 AM 10/26/2017 – Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split”Trump Investigations Report

Trump – from Huffington Post

Trump – from Huffington Post from mikenova (2 sites)
Donald Trump: Donald Trump Throws U.S. Generals Under The Bus In Regard To Niger Attack

And that’s not presidential, experts say.

Donald Trump

Trump News Review

1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites)
trump russian ties – Google News: 51% Say Lawbreaking Likely in Clinton Dealings With Russia – Rasmussen Reports
Donald Trump: Donald Trump Throws U.S. Generals Under The Bus In Regard To Niger Attack
trump under federal investigation – Google News: Trump has spent $1.75 million on White House redecorations – The Hill (blog)
Russian Intelligence services – Google News: Catalonia Latest Target in Russian Active Measures Campaign – Government Accountability Project (blog)
russia helping trump – Google News: Pretty disturbing. Senator slams Trump for ignoring law requiring Russia sanctions – Shareblue Media
putin won US 2016 election – Google News: How ‘Putin’s Revenge’ became Trump’s victory – Yahoo News Canada (blog)
crime and terror – Google News: It’s time for the ATF to refocus its mission – FederalNewsRadio.com
Trump Investigations Report: 10:06 AM 10/26/2017 Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split
Donald Trump: Anna Wintour Reveals She Wouldn’t Invite Donald Trump To The Met Gala Again
Comey – Google News: Howard University Activists Say School is Banning Them From James Comey Lecture – News One
Donald Trump: Top Democrat Rips Trump’s ‘Dangerous’ Pick To Lead NASA
trump as samson – Google News: ‘Witch’s Court’ Continues To Trump ‘Temperature of Love’ In Rating’s Race – Korea Portal (English Edition)
Elections 2016 Investigation – Google News: As Panel Questions Trump Associates, GOP Launches New Probes – In Homeland Security (blog)
Trump Investigations Report: 9:49 AM 10/26/2017 More than 2 months after declaring an opioid crisis, Trump appears to have decided how to proceed Mic
Donald Trump: Jimmy Kimmel Cuts Donald Trump’s ‘Standing Ovations’ Down To Size
Donald Trump | The Guardian: Trump to declare health emergency over opioids but no new funds to help
trump under federal investigation – Google News: White House: Trump to declare opioid crisis a public health emergency – The Hill
trump and republican party – Google News: Trump: ‘We Have Great Unity In The Republican Party’ – CBS Minnesota / WCCO
Trump anxiety – Google News: Trump solidifies his grip on GOP with the exits of Flake, Corker – AZCentral.com
Putin and the Russian Mafia – Google News: Ignatius: Russia’s worrisome push to rewrite cyberspace rules – The Daily Herald
trump russian candidate – Google News: Rep. Schiff On Trump Dossier: Sometimes Opposition Research Is True – RealClearPolitics

 

Saved Stories – 1. Trump
The Early Edition: October 26, 2017
Trump crosses another line – Washington Post
As panel questions Trump associates, GOP launches new probes – STLtoday.com
Republicans Launch New Investigations Into Clinton Email Probe, Uranium Deal – NPR
Republican committees investigate Clinton and Obama – BBC News
Republicans look past Trump scandals, zero in on Hillary Clinton – MSNBC
Robert Mueller Tightens Paul Manafort’s Noose – Vanity Fair
Clinton campaign, DNC paid for research that led to Russia dossier … – Washington Post
The Senate Judiciary Committee’s Russia Probe Just Blew Up – Mother Jones
Trump’s consistent refrain: There is not now and never will be proof of Russian collusion – MyAJC
Obama-era uranium deal yields new questions, new accusations and new investigation – WKBW-TV
BBC sparks outrage inviting former Trump aide Sebastian Gorka on Radio 4’s Today programme – The Independent
her purple eye sockets and swollen lips throbbing. It had been two days since she woke up to her ex-boyfriend … – WIRED
Addressing Russian Influence: What Can We Learn From U.S. Cold War Counter-Propaganda Efforts?
The Clinton camp and DNC funded what became the Trump-Russia dossier: Here’s what it means – Washington Post
#TrumpDossier: It’s Not a ‘Bombshell’ You Moronic Hypocrites – IR.net
Anthony Weiner Will Do Prison Time In Massachusetts – Forward
Trump Was Showered With Russian Flags by a Protester Shouting ‘Treason,’ Video Shows – Newsweek
‘Trump Is Treason!’: Protester Throws Russian Flags At President
Launch probes! Congressional GOPers try desperately to take focus off Trump – CNN
GOP opens investigation into Obama Justice Department – The Mercury News
Putin at Valdai: A Deep Dive Into Long-Standing Grievances – EurasiaNet
Today’s Headlines and Commentary
Michael Bloomberg: Brexit is stupidest thing any country has done besides Trump
Protester Throws Russian Flags At Trump As He Arrives For Capitol Hill Tax Lunch – NPR

 

1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites)
trump russian ties – Google News: 51% Say Lawbreaking Likely in Clinton Dealings With Russia – Rasmussen Reports
 

51% Say Lawbreaking Likely in Clinton Dealings With Russia
Rasmussen Reports
Fifty-two percent (52%) of voters said in April that Bill and Hillary Clinton’s private dealings with Russian officials should be included in the FBI and congressional investigations of the Trump campaign’s alleged Russia ties. (Want a free daily e  

trump russian ties – Google News

Donald Trump: Donald Trump Throws U.S. Generals Under The Bus In Regard To Niger Attack

And that’s not presidential, experts say.

Donald Trump

trump under federal investigation – Google News: Trump has spent $1.75 million on White House redecorations – The Hill (blog)
 

Trump has spent $1.75 million on White House redecorations
The Hill (blog)
The Trump administration has reportedly spent $1.75 million on new furniture, repairs and decorations for the White House. Most of that sum has been for executive office furniture, including a $240,000 contract for wood office furniture, according to … 

trump under federal investigation – Google News

Russian Intelligence services – Google News: Catalonia Latest Target in Russian Active Measures Campaign – Government Accountability Project (blog)
 

Catalonia Latest Target in Russian Active Measures Campaign
Government Accountability Project (blog)
While Russia didn’t articulate an official position on the vote, deeming it an internal matter, it is clear its intelligence serviceswere using (and continue to use) sophisticated active measures in support of breakaway Catalonia to sow chaos and  

Russian Intelligence services – Google News

russia helping trump – Google News: Pretty disturbing. Senator slams Trump for ignoring law requiring Russia sanctions – Shareblue Media
 


Shareblue Media
Pretty disturbing. Senator slams Trump for ignoring law requiring Russia sanctions
Shareblue Media
It is a known fact, confirmed again and again by the entire intelligence community, that Russia interfered in the 2016 election, with the explicit purpose of helping Trump win. Trump still refuses to acknowledge this fact, dismissing it as a hoax and a and more »

russia helping trump – Google News

putin won US 2016 election – Google News: How ‘Putin’s Revenge’ became Trump’s victory – Yahoo News Canada (blog)
 


Yahoo News Canada (blog)
How ‘Putin’s Revenge’ became Trump’s victory
Yahoo News Canada (blog)
Frontline demonstrates, with a clear, easy-to-follow timeline, how Putin and his minions resolved to gain the revenge of the show’s title by directing hackers and other disruptors to increase the already-existing confusion, doubt, and fear in the 

putin won US 2016 election – Google News

crime and terror – Google News: It’s time for the ATF to refocus its mission – FederalNewsRadio.com
 


FederalNewsRadio.com
It’s time for the ATF to refocus its mission
FederalNewsRadio.com
And, while Congress is at it, perhaps thought should be given to returning ATF to Treasury where its crime fighting expertise and production of revenue will be appreciated and reap rewards in the fight against organized crime and terrorism. John A.and more »

crime and terror – Google News

Trump Investigations Report: 10:06 AM 10/26/2017 Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split

10:06 AM 10/26/2017 – Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump split – Google Search Thursday October 26th, 2017 at 10:00 AM Republican Party Pro-Trump Vs Anti-Trump Split – Google News 1 Share 2 Breitbart alumni just abandoned the most Pro-Trump candidate of … Vox–Oct 23, 2017 Kelli Ward, the Republican primary challenger to Sen. … Continue reading“10:06 AM 10/26/2017 – Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split”Trump Investigations Report
Donald Trump: Anna Wintour Reveals She Wouldn’t Invite Donald Trump To The Met Gala Again

Tweetstorm coming in 3… 2…1.

Donald Trump

Comey – Google News: Howard University Activists Say School is Banning Them From James Comey Lecture – News One
 


News One
Howard University Activists Say School is Banning Them From James Comey Lecture
News One
Howard University administration has done everything in its power to exclude students from an upcoming lecture series with former FBI Director James Comey on race and lawenforcment, alleged a campus activist group recently. Comey will lead a series …
White House: Justice Department should ‘look at’ prosecuting ComeySTLtoday.com
Trey Gowdy targeting James Comey in new Clinton probeWashington Examiner
Gowdy, Goodlatte announce investigation into DOJ’s handling of Clinton emailsCBS News
Wall Street Journal –The Mercury News
all 81 news articles »

Comey – Google News

Donald Trump: Top Democrat Rips Trump’s ‘Dangerous’ Pick To Lead NASA

Jim Bridenstine doesn’t even believe in climate science, which “should disqualify him” for the job, says Sen. Patty Murray.

Donald Trump

trump as samson – Google News: ‘Witch’s Court’ Continues To Trump ‘Temperature of Love’ In Rating’s Race – Korea Portal (English Edition)
 


Korea Portal (English Edition)
‘Witch’s Court’ Continues To Trump ‘Temperature of Love’ In Rating’s Race
Korea Portal (English Edition)
“Witch’s Court” continues to dominate the late night. For a few weeks now, the legal drama on KBS has not only surpassed but has overtaken and left its competitor, “Temperature of Love,” in the dust. Two really different new dramas have been in a  

trump as samson – Google News

Elections 2016 Investigation – Google News: As Panel Questions Trump Associates, GOP Launches New Probes – In Homeland Security (blog)
 


CNN
As Panel Questions Trump Associates, GOP Launches New Probes
In Homeland Security (blog)
The Judiciary and Oversight panels have declined to investigate Russia’s interference in the 2016 elections, leaving those probes to Senate committees and the House intelligence committee. Special Counsel Robert Mueller also is investigatingRussia’s …
Courting Democratic Ire, Republicans Open New Obama-Era InquiriesNew York Timesall 97 news articles »

Elections 2016 Investigation – Google News

Trump Investigations Report: 9:49 AM 10/26/2017 More than 2 months after declaring an opioid crisis, Trump appears to have decided how to proceed Mic

More than 2 months after declaring an opioid crisis, Trump appears to have decided how to proceed Thursday October 26th, 2017 at 9:52 AM 1 Share Welcome to Mics daily read on Donald Trumps America. Want to receive this as a daily email in your inbox? Subscribe here. Every day, we bring you a different dispatch on Trumps … Continue reading“9:49 AM 10/26/2017 – More than 2 months after declaring an opioid crisis, Trump appears to have decided how to proceed – Mic”Trump Investigations Report
Donald Trump: Jimmy Kimmel Cuts Donald Trump’s ‘Standing Ovations’ Down To Size

“If only his mother had hugged him just one time.”

Donald Trump

Donald Trump | The Guardian: Trump to declare health emergency over opioids but no new funds to help

The presidents announcement of an emergency over the opioid epidemic may be more symbolic, with no plan to assign money for states proposed measuresDonald Trump is to order his health secretary to declare a public health emergency in response to the USs escalating opioid epidemic. But while the announcement that the president intends to mobilise his entire administration to combat the crisis will be seen as an important symbolic moment, there will be no new funds to deal with an epidemic claiming 100 lives or more a day.

Related: America’s opioid crisis: how prescription drugs sparked a national trauma

Almost 100 people are dying every day across America from opioid overdoses more than car crashes and shootings combined. The majority of these fatalities reveal widespread addiction to powerful prescription painkillers. The crisis unfolded in the mid-90s when the US pharmaceutical industry began marketing legal narcotics, particularly OxyContin, to treat everyday pain. This slow-release opioid was vigorously promoted to doctors and, amid lax regulation and slick sales tactics, people were assured it was safe. But the drug was akin to luxury morphine, doled out like super aspirin, and highly addictive. What resulted was a commercial triumph and a public health tragedy. Belated efforts to rein in distribution fueled a resurgence of heroin and the emergence of a deadly, black market version of the synthetic opioid fentanyl. The crisis is so deep because it affects all races, regions and incomes

Related: This is what the opioid epidemic feels like: ‘My son didn’t have to die’

Continue reading…

Donald Trump | The Guardian

trump under federal investigation – Google News: White House: Trump to declare opioid crisis a public health emergency – The Hill
 


The Hill
White House: Trump to declare opioid crisis a public health emergency
The Hill
The announcement has been months in the making and avoids declaring a more sweeping national emergency under the Stafford Act, which was one option the administration’s opioid commission had previously recommended. The commission recommended either a and more »

trump under federal investigation – Google News

trump and republican party – Google News: Trump: ‘We Have Great Unity In The Republican Party’ – CBS Minnesota / WCCO
 


CBS Minnesota / WCCO
Trump: ‘We Have Great Unity In The Republican Party’
CBS Minnesota / WCCO
Trump: ‘We Have Great Unity In The Republican Party‘. For days, Trump has been sparring with U.S. Senate Republicans Jeff Flake and Bob Corker. Both have criticized his leadership and behavior, Nikki Battiste reports (). WCCO This Morning – October 26, …

and more »

trump and republican party – Google News

Trump anxiety – Google News: Trump solidifies his grip on GOP with the exits of Flake, Corker – AZCentral.com
 


AZCentral.com
Trump solidifies his grip on GOP with the exits of Flake, Corker
AZCentral.com
“What does the ‘Trump Party’ mean other than doing what Trump wants to do? It’s a follow-the-leader kind of thing.” Larry Sabato, the political scientist who directs the University of Virginia’s Center for Politics, said the result is widespread 
Corker: My Foreign Relations Committee Will Keep Standing Up To TrumpTPM
Trump’s noisy tweets haven’t derailed tax reformWashington Postall 4,102 news articles »

Trump anxiety – Google News

Putin and the Russian Mafia – Google News: Ignatius: Russia’s worrisome push to rewrite cyberspace rules – The Daily Herald
 


Business Recorder
Ignatius: Russia’s worrisome push to rewrite cyberspace rules
The Daily Herald
Russia’s bid to rewrite global rules through the U.N. was matched by a personal pitch on cybercooperation in July from President Vladimir Putin to President Trump at the G-20 summit in Hamburg. Putin vehemently denied to Trump that Russiahad 
David Ignatius: Russia’s worrisome push to control cyberspaceWinston-Salem Journalall 109 news articles »

Putin and the Russian Mafia – Google News

trump russian candidate – Google News: Rep. Schiff On Trump Dossier: Sometimes Opposition Research Is True – RealClearPolitics
 


RealClearPolitics
Rep. Schiff On Trump Dossier: Sometimes Opposition Research Is True
RealClearPolitics
Here the Republicans are less interested in what did Russia do and how did they do it and how do we protect ourselves? But rather, let’s shift the focus on to any kind of government misbehavior, and maybe if we can suggest that the whole investigationand more »

trump russian candidate – Google News

 

Saved Stories – 1. Trump
The Early Edition: October 26, 2017
 

Before the start of business, Just Security provides a curated summary of up-to-the-minute developments at home and abroad. Heres todays news.

TRUMP-RUSSIA

The WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was approached by chief executive Alexander Nix of the data firm Cambridge Analytica, which carried out work for the Trump campaign during the 2016 election, Assange said yesterday, saying that he could confirm that he rejected the request from Cambridge Analytica for help. Nicholas Confessore reports at the New York Times.

Nix asked Assange about Hillary Clintons 33,000 missing emails and help to release them, according to sources familiar with the congressional investigations into alleged Trump-Russia connections, Betsy Woodruff reports at The Daily Beast.

The Democratic National Committee (D.N.C.) were unaware that the national party helped to fund the salacious dossier compiled by former British Intelligence officer Christopher Steele which alleged connections between the Trump campaign and Russia, current and past leaders of the D.N.C. have said, following revelations this week that the Clinton campaign and the D.N.C. partly funded the research. Jonathan Easley reports at the Hill.

A U.S. District Court judge has given the opposition research firm Fusion GPS until today to answer a subpoena issued by the House Intelligence Committee earlier this month. Fusion GPS hired Steele to compile the dossier and Republicans in the committee have been seeking information about the firms bank records, Mark Hosenball reports at Reuters.

Documents from Hillary Clintons 2016 presidential campaign are expected to be received by the Senate Intelligence committee next week, according to two sources familiar with the matter. The documents could provide greater detail about the Democrats response to Russias interference campaign and the Democrats role in funding for the Steele dossier, Ali Watkins reports at POLITICO.

The Senate Judiciary Committee has fractured into competing agendas, with Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) focusing on the Obama-era uranium deal with Russia and Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) drafting legislation on foreign influence in U.S. elections. Elana Schor and Kyle Cheney report at POLITICO.

It was legal to publish apparently hacked emails from the D.N.C., lawyers from Trumps presidential campaign argued in a court filing yesterday, saying that WikiLeaks qualifies as an online service immune from legal liability. Josh Gerstein reports at POLITICO.

The key points explaining the background of the dossier and the implications of the latest revelations about funding are set out by Kenneth P. Vogel at the New York Times.

There should be a full investigation following the revelation that the Democrats partly funded the salacious dossier alleging links between the Trump campaign and Russia, congressional investigators should focus on the role of the D.N.C., the Clinton campaign, and the possible role played by the F.B.I., and it would be wise for Mueller to resign from his role. The Wall Street Journal editorial board writes.

The F.B.I. has been so thoroughly implicated in the Russia meddling story and calls for special counsel Robert Mueller to recuse himself from the Russia investigation are not just fanciful partisan grandstanding, Holman W. Jenkins Jr. writes at the Wall Street Journal setting out the connections between the dossier, the Obama administration, the F.B.I. investigation into the Trump campaign, Mueller, the Obama-era deal to expand U.S.-Russia nuclear business, the Clinton Foundation, and the F.B.I.s role in the nuclear business deal.

NORTH KOREA

The U.S. should take literally North Koreas threat to test a nuclear weapon above ground, a senior North Korean official warned in an interview yesterday, adding that Pyongyang has always brought its words into action. Will Ripley reports at CNN.

China is helping us and maybe Russias going through the other way and hurting what were getting, President Trump said in an interview with Fox Business Network yesterday, stating that Russia has undermined efforts to rein in North Korea and that the threat posed by the regime could be more easily resolved if the U.S. had a better relationship with Russia. Reuters reports.

I solve problems, Trump also said in the interview, lamenting the fact that the North Korea problem had not been resolved earlier, but saying that he would deal with the crisis. Olivia Beavers reports at the Hill.

Well, Id rather not say, but youll be surprised, Trump said yesterday in response to a question whether he would visit the Demilitarized Zone (D.M.Z.) between North and South Korea during his 12-day tour of Asia at the beginning of next month. Jordan Fabian reports at the Hill.

The leader of South Koreas conservative opposition party has called on the Trump administration to reintroduce tactical nuclear weapons to South Korea in the face of the threat posed by Pyongyang, the possibility of this option was also raised by South Koreas Defense Minister Song Young-moo during a meeting with Defense Secretary Jim Mattis last month. Felicia Schwartz reports at the Wall Street Journal.

North Koreas extensive re-education camps have been revealed by satellite images and a report by the U.S.-based Committee for Human Rights in North Korea due to be released today. Anna Fifield reports at the Washington Post.

IRAQ

The U.S. and Iran should not bring their trouble inside Iraq, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi urged yesterday, saying that he would like to work with both countries, that U.S. forces should remain in Iraq after recapturing the last of the territory in the hands of the Islamic State group, and that Iranian-backed militias would be disbanded if they did not come under the control of the Baghdad government. Yaroslav Trofimov reports at the Wall Street Journal.

We wont accept anything but its cancellation and the respect of the Constitution, Abadi said in a statement today, saying that the Kurdistan regions offer to freeze the result of the controversial Iraqi Kurdistan independence referendum held last month was not enough to open negotiations. Reutersreports.

Iraqi federal forces and Iranian-backed Iraqi militia attacked Peshmerga positions in Nineveh province, the Kurdistan Region Security Council (K.R.S.C.) said today, also calling on the Baghdad government to accept the offers for unconditional talks and adding that the U.S. should stop Iraqs reckless behavior. Reuters reporting.

The clashes between Iraqi federal forces and Kurdish Peshmerga have impeded the movement of coalition military equipment inside Iraq and Syria, thereby undermining the campaign against the Islamic State group, the spokesperson for the U.S.-led coalition Col. Ryan Dillon said today. The APreports.

The U.S. has sought to defuse tension between the Iraqi government and the Iraqi Kurds, the two U.S. allies have been involved in clashes since last months Iraqi Kurdistan independence referendum, the Iraqi Kurds yesterday offered to suspend the results of the referendum which returned an overwhelming vote in favor of independence, however this has fallen short of Baghdads demand that the result be annulled. Isabel Coles, Ali A. Nabhan and Yaroslav Trofimov report at the Wall Street Journal.

Abadi is set to meet with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani today in Tehran for talks on regional security, Ted Regencia reports at Al Jazeera.

Abadis approach to the Kurdistan independence referendum has won praise from even his traditional critics, and his increased popularity as a consequence of his decisive actions have seemingly cemented his reelection next year, however difficulties remain. Tamer El-Ghobashy and Mustafa Salim observe at the Washington Post.

Abadi has managed to keep Iraq unified despite the predictions of an inevitable breakup, taking a tough stance against the Iraqi Kurdistan has seemingly paid off and Abadi is in a stronger position to lead the country out of the shadow of war and work with regional powers. Ishaan Tharoor provides an analysis at the Washington Post.

NIGER

My generals and my military had authorization over the U.S. mission in Niger, Trump said yesterday when asked whether he authorized the mission, making the comments after the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph Dunford said earlier this week that the U.S. special forces members were on a reconnaissance mission. Rebecca Kheel reports at the Hill.

The confused information amid the Niger ambush on Oct. 4 led the White House to believe that several U.S. soldiers might have been missing, the White House did not receive information that three bodies had been recovered and one soldier remained missing until at least eight hours after the attack began, according to an official familiar with the matter. Greg Jaffe and Karen DeYoung report at the Washington Post.

The Trump administration has been putting in motion plans to allow lethal drone strikes in Niger, according to U.S. officials, and the plan had been under consideration long before the deadly Oct. 4 attack. Ken Dilanian, Courtney Kube, William M. Arkin and Hans Nichols report at NBC News.

IRAN

Israel would act militarily by itself if international efforts led by Trump do not help stop Iran attaining nuclear capabilities, Israels Intelligence Minister Israel Katz said today. Tim Kelly and Nobuhiro Kubo reporting at Reuters.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has embarked on efforts to increase financial pressure on Iran and target the financing of terror in the Middle East, launching a new anti-terror finance center in Saudi Arabia yesterday. The efforts come following Trumps refusal to certify Irans compliance with the 2015 nuclear agreement last month, Ian Talley and Margherita Stancati report at the Wall Street Journal.   

The House of Representatives voted for new sanctions against the Iran-backed Lebanese Shiite Hezbollah militia group yesterday, today the House will vote on another bill calling for additional sanctions aimed at Irans ballistic missiles program. Al Jazeera reports.

A bipartisan plan for a tougher approach on Iran is being crafted by Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) along with his Democratic counterpart Ben Cardin (Md.), Corker said yesterday. Elana Schor reporting at POLITICO.

SYRIA

Pro-Syrian government forces have seized an oil pumping station in the eastern Deir al-Zour province, a Hezbollah-run news service reported today, the report saying that the position constitutes a launch pad for an offensive on what is believed to be the last remaining Islamic State stronghold in Syria. Reuters reports.

The outcome is not in doubt, the U.S. commander of the international campaign against the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq, Lt. Gen. Paul E. Funk II, said yesterday, saying that the militants were on the run and they cannot hold territory, but noting that the coalition would continue to pursue foreign Islamic State fighters before they can return to their home countries and there is a real problem that the virtual caliphate continues to recruit. David Zucchino reports at the New York Times.

The U.N. envoy for Syria Staffan de Mistura will meet with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in Geneva today, the AP reports.

U.S.-led airstrikes continue. U.S. and coalition forces carried out seven airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Syria on October 24. Separately, partner forces conducted three strikes against targets in Iraq. [Central Command]

RUSSIA

Top Senate Republicans have vowed to press the White House on delays to imposing new sanctions on Russia and whether this has been done intentionally, the legislation for the sanctions was passed three and a half weeks ago and were in response to Russias interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Kevin Liptak, Ted Barrett and Sara Murray report at CNN.

Democratic members of House Foreign Affairs Committee have also demanded answers from the Trump administration on delays to sanctions against Russia in a letter to the president yesterday. Andrew Desiderio reports at The Daily Beast.

Germanys President Frank-Walter Steinmeier met with Russian President Vladimir Putin yesterday to discuss key issues, such as Ukraine, Syria, economic ties, the Iran nuclear deal and the crisis on the Korean Peninsula. The AP reports.

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION FOREIGN POLICY

Trumps son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner is expected to take a low-profile role during Trumps visit to China next month, with some speculating that Kushners diminished position has been a consequence of chief of staff John Kellys efforts to standardize practice at the White House. Annie Karni and Andrew Restuccia report at POLITICO.

The relationship between the most senior U.S. officials at N.A.T.O. headquarters is described by David M. Herszenhorn at POLITICO Magazine.

The challenges facing the Trump administration did not start with Trump and the White House must grapple with the most challenging foreign-policy environment in modern history due to threat, organizational and cognitive complexities. Amy Zegart writes at The Atlantic.

Secretary of State Rex Tillersons visit to Pakistan this week shone a spotlight on the difficulty U.S.-Pakistan relationship, it is difficult to understand the U.S. position due to its inconsistent messages and Tillerson should not have lectured Pakistan without recognizing Pakistans legitimate security interests.  The DAWN.com editorial board writes.

Tillerson achieved a rare diplomatic victory by bringing Saudi Arabia and Iraq closer together last weekend, marking a potentially significant development between the two countries who have been traditional adversaries. Rhys Dubin writes at Foreign Policy.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

The House of Representatives held a series of hearings focused on the Trump administrations knowledge of Kaspersky Lab anti-virus software and Russias ability to access U.S. National Security Agency (N.S.A.) classified information through Kaspersky Lab products. Morgan Chalfant reports at the Hill.

The U.S. and Gulf Arab allies sanctioned eleven Yemeni individuals and entities suspected of financing the Islamic State group and al-Qaeda, the U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin praising the designation by Gulf Arab allies, the measure demonstrating a rare moment of coordination, especially amid the Gulf crisis which began on June 5. Aya Batrawy and Abdullah Al-Shihri report at the AP.

A former F.B.I. informant has been cleared to testify before Congress over the Obama-era nuclear business deal with Russia, a Justice Department spokesperson confirming that the informant would not be subject to a confidentiality agreement. John Solomon reports at the Hill.

The Senate Armed Services Committee has expressed confidence that it will finish work on the annual defense policy bill soon, the chairman of the committee John McCain (R-Ariz.) saying that it can be done in the next few days. Rebecca Kheel reports at the Hill.

I havent seen any hard evidence on the delivery of weapons from the Russians to the Taliban, the chairman of N.A.T.O.s military committee Gen. Petr Pavel told reporters yesterday, making the comments amid concern from Pentagon officials that Russia has been increasingly involved in the conflict in Afghanistan. Rebecca Kheel reports at the Hill.

The position of military generals at the top of the Trump administration carries risks and perhaps they are in over their heads. Mark Perry writes at POLITICO Magazine.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is expected to propose strategic dialogue between the leaders of the U.S., India and Australia to counter Chinas expansionism. Reuters reports.

Read on Just Security »

Trump crosses another line – Washington Post
 


Washington Post
Trump crosses another line
Washington Post
But it is nevertheless shocking to learn that Mr. Trump has breached tradition to personally interview two candidates for U.S. attorney both of whom would have the power to investigate him in the future. Politico and CNN report that Mr. Trump met  

As panel questions Trump associates, GOP launches new probes – STLtoday.com
 


STLtoday.com
As panel questions Trump associates, GOP launches new probes
STLtoday.com
The announcements of the investigations by three GOP committees were criticized by Democrats as a “massive diversion” from congressional probes into potential coordination between the Kremlin and associates of the Trump campaign and from two …
Dossier fight could be first legal test for Hill Russia probesPoliticoall 17 news articles »

Republicans Launch New Investigations Into Clinton Email Probe, Uranium Deal – NPR
 


NPR
Republicans Launch New Investigations Into Clinton Email Probe, Uranium Deal
NPR
For Trump, however, the case was made: “Remember that Hillary Clinton gave Russia 20 percent of American uranium and, you know, she was paid a fortune,” Trump said at a campaign rally last October. “You know, they got a tremendous amount of money.”.
Dossier fight could be first legal test for Hill Russia probes – POLITICOPolitico
Republicans on House’s Trump-Russia Probe Not That Interested in …Daily Beast
Trump’s lawyer meets with House investigatorsThe Hill
Courthouse News Service –Wall Street Journal
all 81 news articles »
Republican committees investigate Clinton and Obama – BBC News
 


BBC News
Republican committees investigate Clinton and Obama
BBC News
“This new investigation is a massive diversion to distract from the lack of Republican oversight of the Trump administration and the national security threat that Russia poses,” said Elijah Cummings and John Conyers in a statement. Mrs Clinton said in
Republicans open investigations into Clinton uranium deal and Obama DOJABC News
President Trump trades insults with the GOP leader of Senate Foreign Relations CommitteeLos Angeles Times
House GOP launches probes into Clinton, Obama controversiesPolitico
Washington Post –Press Herald –The Hill –The Hill
all 198 news articles »
Republicans look past Trump scandals, zero in on Hillary Clinton – MSNBC
 


MSNBC
Republicans look past Trump scandals, zero in on Hillary Clinton
MSNBC
House Republicans on Tuesday announced investigations into two of President Trump’s most frequent grievances, unveiling new inquiries into actions of the Obama administration connected to Hillary Clinton. In the first of two back-to-back announcements, …
Republican committees investigate Clinton and ObamaBBC News
Republicans open investigations into Clinton uranium deal and Obama DOJABC News
President Trump trades insults with the GOP leader of Senate Foreign Relations CommitteeLos Angeles Times
Politico –Washington Post –The Hill –The Hill
all 211 news articles »
Robert Mueller Tightens Paul Manafort’s Noose – Vanity Fair
 


Reuters
Robert Mueller Tightens Paul Manafort’s Noose
Vanity Fair
… noteworthy, as any charges born out of the investigations would be exempt from presidential pardonswhich only apply to federal crimesraising the possibility that they could be used as leverage against Manafort and, by extension, the Trumpcampaign.
Manhattan US attorney adds to probes of ex-Trump aide Manafort: reportsReuters
Paul Manafort faces new money laundering probe by US attorney’s office in NY: sourceABC Newsall 26 news articles »

Clinton campaign, DNC paid for research that led to Russia dossier … – Washington Post
 


Washington Post
Clinton campaign, DNC paid for research that led to Russia dossier …
Washington Post
The Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee helped fund research that resulted in a now-famous dossier containing allegations about …
Dossier fight could be first legal test for Hill Russia probesPolitico
Republicans on House’s Trump-Russia Probe Not That Interested in Trump or RussiaDaily Beastall 175 news articles »

The Senate Judiciary Committee’s Russia Probe Just Blew Up – Mother Jones
 


Mother Jones
The Senate Judiciary Committee’s Russia Probe Just Blew Up
Mother Jones
Judiciary’s Russia investigation is the latest congressional probe to stall out over GOP efforts to pursue matters Democrats see as gambits to distract or provide cover for the Trump administration. The partisan sparring within the committees looking  

Trump’s consistent refrain: There is not now and never will be proof of Russian collusion – MyAJC
 


MyAJC
Trump’s consistent refrain: There is not now and never will be proof of Russian collusion
MyAJC
In early October, Trump claimed that the Department of Justice had “fed information” to the Clinton campaign about theinvestigation into Clinton’s email server, which was “collusion and corruption of the highest order.” It was “one more reason” why he and more »

Obama-era uranium deal yields new questions, new accusations and new investigation – WKBW-TV
 


WKBW-TV
Obama-era uranium deal yields new questions, new accusations and new investigation
WKBW-TV
WASHINGTON, DC – JULY 25: House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, who previously had recused himself from the panel’s Russia investigation, arrives ahead of White House Senior Advisor and President Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared … New 
Embattled House Intel chair launches probe into US-Russia uranium deal implicating Hillary ClintonBusiness Insider
‘Baloney’: Hillary chokes on red-hot scandalWND.com
House opens probe into Russian Federation uranium dealІnsіdеr Cаr Nеwsall 228 news articles »

BBC sparks outrage inviting former Trump aide Sebastian Gorka on Radio 4’s Today programme – The Independent
 


The Independent
BBC sparks outrage inviting former Trump aide Sebastian Gorka on Radio 4’s Today programme
The Independent
The BBC has been heavily criticised for inviting one of Donald Trump’s most controversial former aides on to its flagship radio news programme. Sebastian Gorka appeared on BBC Radio 4’s Today to respond to the resignations of two Republican senators … 

her purple eye sockets and swollen lips throbbing. It had been two days since she woke up to her ex-boyfriend … – WIRED
 


WIRED
her purple eye sockets and swollen lips throbbing. It had been two days since she woke up to her ex-boyfriend…
WIRED
But Anna didn’t die. Instead, the then-28-year-old journalist peeled herself off of the couch, dripping blood as she hobbled to the bathroom. The next day, she phoned her editor, Katya. In the white-walled calmness of Katya’s apartment in Moscow’s Red … 

Addressing Russian Influence: What Can We Learn From U.S. Cold War Counter-Propaganda Efforts?

Microsoft and Google have joined Facebook in revealing that Russia may have purchased ads in an effort to manipulate the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Reactions to this news have been a mix of bewilderment and alarmbut perhaps we should not be so surprised. The fabricated news stories and click-bait headlines that dominated social media throughout the 2016 campaign are not a new tactic for the Russians. They are simply the latest iteration of a practice Moscow has used for nearly a century.This type of operation is known in the intelligence community as disinformation, an Anglicization of the Russian term dezinformatsiya. Disinformation has taken many forms across the decades, from funding communist newspapers to orchestrating the publication of news stories based on forged documents. During the Cold War these tactics were at the forefront of the Soviet Unions strategy to discredit and undermine the United States. In light of this history, it is perhaps useful to look at how the United States countered Soviet tactics and consider whether any U.S. countermeasures drawn from the past can be adapted to address the situation today.

 

The Soviets Historical Use of Propaganda

Early Soviet disinformation focused on softening Josef Stalins image in Europe and easing concerns that the USSR had expansionist ambitions. In the 1930s, Moscow orchestrated the dramatic escape of defectorsdiplomats such as Grigory Besedovsky, who very publicly escaped the Soviet embassy in Paris, and Sergei Dmitrievsky who did the same in Stockholm. Both initially spoke out against the USSR and later, after gaining credibility, began disseminating disinformation about the regime, portraying Stalin as tough but honest, pro-Western and strictly Russia-oriented.

After World War II, the Soviets shifted their focus to the United States. Two years after the surrender of Nazi Germany, in 1947, Soviet leadership created the Committee of Information to run undercover operations to influence public opinion. In the 1950s, a specialized intelligence unit was establishedspecifically to disseminate disinformation. In the 1970s, as disinformation became a larger part of the Soviet strategy, the unit was upgraded to a full service and placed under the command of a KGB general.

The Soviets created several avenues for disseminating disinformation. Moscow covertly fundedcommunist newspapers and radio stations around the world, particularly in Africa and Latin America, where they especially hoped to exert influence. They also funded communist parties in Western countries, and established frontssuch as the World Peace Council, World Federation of Free Trade Unions, and the World Federation of Democratic Youthto spread communist ideology.

One of the most popular methods of disseminating disinformation targeted legitimate news outlets. By anonymously sending forged documentssuch as embassy communications or military memorandato credible publications, the Soviets attempted to create well-timed fake news stories that the public accepted as true. Once the stories caught on, they were reprinted extensively in Soviet-controlled papers in the hopes that the story would be picked up by more mainstream sourcesand would gain credibility in the process.

Disinformation often highlighted unattractive aspects of American culture, exaggerating real problems and imagining non-existent ones. A particular object of disinformation campaigns was the very real systemic racism and discrimination in the United States. When the truth had the potential to be damaging enough on its own, the Soviets simply aimed to direct attention to the story. The arrest and trial of the African-American communist academic Angela Davis, for example, was widely publicized by Soviet outlets, particularly in Africa. Davis was accused of providing a handgun to militants, who then used the weapon in a courtroom shooting. The propaganda pieces about her trial described the proceedings as racially and ideologically driven, and they predicted an unjust outcome. Soviet efforts, at least in this instance, were ultimately undermined when Davis was acquitted by an all-white jury.

Stories from the emerging civil rights movement were distorted to create an exaggerated picture of the racial divide in the United States. Many Soviet citizens believed that lynchings were commonplace and legal, that broad swaths of American society accepted the KKK, and that most schools were segregated. More often, however, disinformation stories were simply pure fabrications. Following President Jimmy Carters boycott of the Moscow Summer Olympics in 1980, the KGB forged letters from the Ku Klux Klan that threatened athletes from African countries and mailed them from Washington, D.C., to the countries Olympic committees. Although none of the countries succumbed to this intimidation, the attorney general and FBI Director were forced to deny U.S. involvement and point the finger at Moscow.

Though fake news was a popular tool during the Cold War, it was much more effective in developing countries where journalistic standards were lower. In Latin America and Africa, forged documents tended not to be investigated thoroughly prior to publication, and, as a result, Soviet disinformation campaigns successfully soured public opinion of the United States. In the West, success was more elusive. Journalists were more careful; they were more likely to follow up on suspicious allegations and less likely to publish a story with a single, anonymous source of evidence.

A better-known disinformation campaign, the ominously named Operation INFEKTION, sought to exploit international fears of U.S. military expansion by sowing the narrative that AIDS had been created as the result of American biological weapons experimentation. The story, based on an anonymous letter from an American scientist, was initially published in a communist Indian newspaper, but at the time it was largely ignored. It was revived three years later, howeverthis time, in an East German paper and with the additional backing of a pseudoscientific report published in East Berlin. The story spread quickly, primarily through publication in Soviet and other communist or leftist papers around the globe, and entered the public discourse to the point that U.S. officials were forced to repeatedly address and refute the story. It only disappeared from headlines after the United States threatened to cut off scientific cooperation with the USSR in the field of AIDS research.

Other forgeries also tried to paint an unflattering picture of the United States, depicting a government eager to use assassination, coups, and election manipulation to achieve its ideological goals. A forged telegram attempted to link the killing of Afghan leader Hafizullah Amin to a CIA plot. A separate forged letter appeared to show American support for the conservatives in the 1981 Greek elections and plans for a coup if Socialist leader Andreas Papandreou won. Fake documents in 1983 seemed to show plans to overthrow the Ghanaian regime. A forged Presidential memorandum to the Departments of State and Defense and the CIA appeared to order those agencies to establish a U.S. military force called the Permanent Peace Forces that would be used to intervene in Latin Americathus inflaming nationalist and anti-American sentiment in the region.

The disinformation campaigns also attempted to portray the United States as an untrustworthy ally, though these campaigns were largely unsuccessful. A forged letter published in a left wing Belgian newspaper, for example, appeared to show retired NATO Commander Alexander Haig and NATO Secretary General Joseph Luns discussing a nuclear first strike and planning a sensitive operation to jolt the faint hearted in Europe. A separate forged letter from President Ronald Reagan to Spanish King Juan Carlos appeared to show the United States putting pressure on Spain to join NATO, while a forged speech purportedly for U.N. Ambassador Jeanne Kirkpatrick appeared to show U.S. support for the balkanization of India.

These campaigns also, somewhat ironically, attempted to demonstrate that the United States was engaging in disinformation campaigns of its own. Fake telegrams from the American Embassy in Rome purportedly showed plans to blame the 1981 attempted assassination of Pope John Paul II on the Soviets. Another attempt used a forged letter from a United States Information Agency (USIA) official to a senator, in which the official suggested the use of false statements and exaggerations about the Chernobyl disaster to damage perception of the Soviets, althoughunder this Soviet narrativethe plot was uncovered before the letter could circulate.

If all of this sounds eerily familiar, it should: The goals and tactics of Putins Russia are not far removed from the goals of Soviet era propagandists. Putins Moscow has continued the strategy of using disinformation to take advantage of and further sow civil discord in the United States, to undercut the United States directly and to undermine U.S. foreign relations.

The recent revelations from Silicon Valley giants FacebookGoogle, and Microsoftrevelations that Russia likely spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on politically targeted advertising that spread disinformationillustrate how Moscow is pursuing long-standing foreign policy goals while adapting to changing technology. The political ads appeared to address both sides of the U.S. political divide, reaching millions of Americans. The goal of these ads appears to be the widening of domestic divisions and amplification of existing fears. Some Facebook ads, for example, supported the Black Lives Matter movement, while others aimed to paint the organization as a danger to society. Some ads appeared to highlight support for then-candidate Hillary Clinton, while others attempted to alarm potential voters by showing her popularity with Muslim women. In a number of cases, the ads were targeted directly at key demographics in Wisconsin and Michigan.

Russia still uses its own overt propaganda machine to spread disinformation, particularly through the television station Russia Today and the news agency Sputnik. These outlets disseminate misleading and fabricated information about the United States and NATO members, often relating to those actors foreign policy objectives and military operations. Sputnik and Russia Today, for example, reported on a fire at a NATO base in Izmir, Turkey, alleging that the fire was the result of intentional sabotage after the failed Turkish coup. Although there had been a fire, it was blazing some distance away in a nearby forest and did not appear to have been the result of arson. Stories like these are often not intended to influence American voters, but instead to affect Russian citizens and sympathetic foreign nationals by fostering the perception of the United States as a war mongering, expansionist nation.

 

U.S. Counter-Propaganda Efforts

During the Cold War, the United States utilized a range of strategies to push back against Soviet active measures. These can be categorized in three groups: First, the United States centralized its response and coordinated a strategy in order to utilize the power of its example; second, it responded directly to Soviet efforts, cultivating thought leaders around the world and spreading American narratives globallyover a variety of mediums; and third, the United States acted to inform the public and embarrass Soviet officials by calling out Soviet propaganda while strengthening allies, media outlets and public officials in a position to prevent the spread communist propaganda.

Efforts like the Marshall Plan, the space race, the civil rights movement, and international development efforts all can be viewed as attempts to respond through the power of example. The United States also responded directly to Soviet efforts, empowering the CIA to cultivate and develop foreign thought leaders while creating the United States Information Agency (USIA) and authorizing it to push an American narrative to the world. Later, after these efforts dwindled, the Reagan administration would create the Active Measures Working Group (AMWG)perhaps the most successful counter-propaganda effort of the entire Cold War.

Sensing that it was losing the battle for the European intelligentsia, in 1953, President Eisenhower established the United States Information Agency (USIA), which became the chosen instrument for ideological operations during the Cold War. At its height, the USIA had the most extensive overseas presence of any Washington agency. USIAs activities included publishing magazines, pamphlets, leaflets and establishing a global library network. In the Soviet Union, the U.S. Embassy distributedcopies of magazines and books to officials and other prominent people. One such official was none other than a young party-secretary named Mikhail Gorbachev.

Perhaps most importantly, USIA produced Voice of Americaa network broadcast heard by over 100 million people and in over forty languages during the Cold War. It is hard to judge how effective programs like Voice of America were in changing public opinion, but Soviet officials disliked them enough to invest significant resources into building a vast network of jammers that emitted noise on frequencies used by Western broadcasters. The jamming program was massive, and its total power was estimated to be three times that of all Western radios combined. In the face of such resistance, however, Western programmers simply targeted smaller cities and rural areas where jammers were less concentrated. Through underground networks, Soviet dissidents made copies of broadcasts, distributing them throughout the country.

USIA programs were only one part of official efforts to influence the rest of the world, however. Other federal bureaucraciesin particular the Department of Defense and the CIAmatched, and often surpassed, the USIAs operations.

In Europe, military intelligence planners stockpiled large polyethylene balloons full of propaganda notes. The balloons would then rise 30,000-40,000 feet, follow the prevailing wind, and break open at predetermined coordinates, scattering leaflets across the land below. This operation lasted from October 1951 until November 1956, and for its duration, the skies of Central Europe were littered with more than 350,000 balloons carrying over 300,000,000 leaflets, posters, books and other printed matter.

Beginning in 1950, the CIA covertly established and funded the Congress for Cultural Freedom. At its peak, the Congress had offices in 35 countries, employed dozens of personnel, published over twenty prestige magazines, held art exhibitions, owned a news and features service, organized high-profile international conferences, and rewarded musicians and artists with prizes and public performances. Its mission was to nudge the intelligentsia of Western Europe away from its lingering fascination with Marxism and communism towards a view more accommodating of the American way.

The United States engaged in less idealistic measures as well. The Operations Coordinating Board, an ideological warfare planning team within the National Security Council, was tasked with creating integrated country plans to manage communism. These plans generally followed the standard lines of containment: for example, plotting and executing an intervention in Philippine elections to ensure a pro-Western result and facilitating anti-communist activity by trade unions in order to destabilize the government of Arbenz Guzman in Guatemala. The CIA also used U.S. corporations to funnel money to non-communist political parties and trade unions. Private publications, such as The International Herald-Tribune received money to reprint pro-U.S. news.

 

The Active Measures Working Group

U.S. attempts to counter Soviet disinformation eventually fell out of favor in Washington and had virtually disappeared by the late 1970s. Yet in 1981, with the election of Ronald Reagan, the United States re-energized its efforts, creating the Active Measures Working Group (AMWG). AMWG was an interagency committee chaired by the Department of State and included representatives of the CIA, USIA, the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, and the Departments of Defense and Justice. Operating under its methodology of Report-Analyze-Publicize (RAP), AMWG officials monitoredSoviet disinformation campaigns, issued regularly updated reports, talked to Western press, personally called editors of newspapers that ran Soviet-sponsored disinformation stories, and occasionally confronted Soviet officials directly about particular active measures.

By limiting the scope of its activities to countering Soviet influence operations that could be exposed in a compelling way, the AMWG was able to significantly undermine the effectiveness of Soviet disinformation campaigns. The group published its first report, State Department Special Report 88 in October 1981. The document was simple, containing a four-page overview of Soviet disinformation techniques and themes. Yet over 14,000 copies of the report were distributed to news organizations, federal agencies and allies. Six years later, the document would find its hands into none other than Mikhail Gorbachev, who waved a copy at then-Secretary of State George Shultz, complaining that the information was damaging the Soviet Unions reputation. Simply exposing Soviet acts of disinformation proved an extremely powerful tool.

 

Lessons from U.S. Counter-Propaganda Efforts

The current Russian strategy of active measures, of which disinformation is one part, appears largely the same as that utilized during the Soviet period. However, significant changes in the media landscape have made those active measures more effective in todays United States. From the late 1940s until the fall of the Berlin Wall, Soviet agents had difficulty utilizing active measures against Western countries; well-trained journalists and editors were generally suspicious of too-good-to-be-true claims and they thoroughly vetted stories before publication. Those outlets where the Soviets found success in placing disinformation tended to be outlets that were discredited by their very nature: party magazines, tabloids, or well-known pro-communist publications with small readerships. Writing in 1983 for the U.S. Army War Colleges journal, Ambassador Dennis Kux, former director of the Active Measures Working Group, noted:

Disinformation appears to fare poorly in Western Democracies with their free press. With a few exceptions, disinformation has largely surfaced either in sensationalist or pro-communist journals, where it has little impact on public opinion. Responsible journalists and journals check out suspicious sounding allegations or anonymous documents. They do not generally publish stories lacking evidence and sourcing.

Today, the media landscape is vastly different: No longer do major media outlets dominate limited information streams. Reflecting the broader disintermediation of American society, technology has given rise to many more media organizations and information platforms, not all of which share the same editorial standards or capacity as top publications. Moreover, websites can be created cheaply and easily, and each one carries with it the potential to reach vast audiences, based not on long-term credibility and accuracy, but instead on displaying the right headline and click-bait story at the right time. Whereas Soviet agents would plant disinformation in Indian or Nigerian media and wait for it to bubble up to major outlets, Russian propagandists today have to worry less about getting disinformation past pesky editors and can instead inject it directly into the mainstream of democratic discourse.

Even so, there may be lessons that the United States can learn from its Cold War competition with the Soviets, particularly from the later success of the AMWG.

To do so, it is important to distinguish between two related, but analytically distinct, Russian active measure tactics. The first involves the hacking of governmental and private computer systems and selectively leaking sensitive information in order to create a desired misperception of reality. A second tactic consists of deliberate distortion, outright manipulation and active lying in order to create a false understanding of the world.

We have noted throughout this piece that the strategy associated with active measures and disinformation is substantially the same as before, but that because of changes in media technology and Russian tactics, it now seems to be more successful in the United States. We posit that this is because until very recently, free speech had a set of natural regulators. Producing a widely read newspaper or a well-watched television show was capital intensive. Moreover, top publications with large readerships had sophisticated editors who viewed it as their ethical responsibility to separate fact from fiction. This ethical responsibility was supported further by a professional duty to ensure that the paper maintained its credibility with its audience. After all, that long-term credibility was a business asset. Today, that appears to no longer be true, especially as Facebook impression algorithms distort economic incentives.

The question then is how to replicate those regulatorsthe guardians of the marketplace of ideasin a rapidly disintermediating society.

The first step may simply be to create a new AMWG-like working group tasked with tackling Russian disinformation directly, publicly and deliberately. This group could coordinate policy and platform solutions with major technology companies, review and propose legislative solutions, and empower, strengthen and educate the press, diplomatic officials and the public at large in order to combat Russian active measures.

Transparency is key. The AMWG found success when it took the time to publicize what Soviet propagandists were doing and why. According to Dennis Kux, [t]he best means of rendering the ground less fertile is to ensure that people . . . are fully aware of attempts to deceive them. An interagency group that focuses on credibly highlighting Russian activity could potentially replicate that success. At the moment, some non-governmental groups have taken on this project. For example, the German Marshall Fund recently launched Hamilton 68. a project led by Clint Watts, J.M. Berger, Andrew Weisburd and Jonathon Morgan that seeks to expose the effects of Russian online influence networks in real time and to inform the public of themes and content being promoted to Americans by foreign powers. A new AMWG could launch similar efforts or help insure that non-governmental efforts are adequately funded.

This work may seem duplicative at a moment when both special counsel and congressional committees are actively investigating Russian activity. But that interest will not prove sustainable over the long term: Mueller will end his investigation and Congress will move on at some point. High-profile institutional actors cannot sustain intense focus on a single issue forever. Russia, by contrast, will remain a persistent threat. Reestablishing a lean interagency committee to coordinate counter-narratives and responses to Russian active measures has value. That work, in fact, could not be more important.

Throughout its tenure, the original AMWG repeatedly noted that Russian propaganda rarely had a substantial impact inside the United States because credible media outlets usually weeded out fake stories and false headlines, preempting them from reaching large audiences. Today, the flow of information no longer appears to permit the United States such refuge. As part of its work, then, this new AMWG should coordinate with technology companies to find solutions that effectively disrupt Russian activities.

But tech companies need not wait for the creation of such a group. Leading social media platforms and major news outlets should start by providing a forthright account to the American people about what has happened and what they see happening today. They could also begin by implementing the most apparent solutions, two of which we outline below.

One solution is that journalists should adopt a norm against publishing hacked material until they are able to fully contextualize and verify it. This was precisely the approach that major news outlets in France took in early 2017 when, just a few hours before the end of the French presidential campaign, thousands of internal documents attributed to Emmanuel Macrons campaign were published on the internet. Le Monde, in explaining its decision not to publish the leaked material, noted these files were published 48 hours before the vote, with the clear goal of harming the validity of the ballot. American outlets should adopt a similar norm. Many leaks have not been used to inform public discussion, but are instead a form of weaponized organization doxxing. And the New York Times and Washington Post have been more than content at times to parrot Wikileaks content without reflection in a race to publish.

Skeptics will assert that this will not solve the problem. Even if major U.S. outlets choose not to publish hacked material, foreign outlets, with no allegiance to the security or integrity of the United States, may choose to publish them online. Once on the internet and in English, they can easily ricochet around the internet with abandon. And of course, blogs, social media pages and other non-traditional media can easily pick up stories neglected by major outlets. Many of these concerns have merit.

Yet even so, there is reason to believe that a strategy of self-policing by major outlets could depress the success of Russian active measures. Most Americans continue to receive the majority of their news from established news outlets. According to Pew, only four in ten Americans regularly get their news online. Further, of those that do consume news online, roughly twice as many people receive their news from major news organizations than from social media. In this way, major media outlets can and should still play a regulating effect.

Online platforms also have a role to play in regulation. Already, some are stepping up. For example, Google has reconfigured search algorithms in an attempt to prevent conspiracy sites from populating search functions. Similarly, YouTube determined that flagged videos that contain controversial … content will be put in a limited state where they cannot be suggested to other users, recommended, monetized, or given comments or likes. And Facebook itself has taken steps to tamp down the amount of disinformation on its platform, first by allowing users to flag purportedly fake news and second by providing users with additional information about publishers and related articles with a new I buttonon news feed links.

Paradoxically, these outlets should no longer be paralyzed by concerns of censorship. Free speech has always relied on credible regulators to inform the public and prevent the marketplace of ideas from collapsing into a cacophony of chaos, misinformation, and manipulation. Today, those regulators are no longer experienced editors or producers but must instead be the platform managers and users of online social media. In this way, we may even view this type of free speech regulation as more democratized.

 

Conclusion

The potential solutions we outline above are likely only the start of a conversation regarding what is required to push back against Russian active measures. Throughout the struggle for supremacy during the Cold War, the United States actively battled Soviet active measures and disinformation campaigns designed to discredit the United States abroad and undermine social cohesion at home. In recent years, Russia has renewed that fight, and while many factors have changedsome of which favor Russian efforts more than American responsesthere is still a great deal that the United States can learn, both positive and negative, from its experience. The fight then was iterative and often experimental, and that dynamism and flexibility will likely be necessary today.

The Clinton camp and DNC funded what became the Trump-Russia dossier: Here’s what it means – Washington Post
 


Washington Post
The Clinton camp and DNC funded what became the Trump-Russia dossier: Here’s what it means
Washington Post
The Washington Post broke the story Tuesday night that the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee helped pay for that now-famous dossier of research on President Trump. The Post’s Adam Entous, Devlin Barrett and Rosalind S.
Clinton Campaign and Democratic Party Helped Pay for Russia Trump DossierNew York Times
Trump-Russia dossier research was originally funded by the Clinton campaign and the DNCCNBC
The Trump dossier was Clinton’s dirtiest political trickNew York Post
Fox News –NBCNews.com –CBS News
all 138 news articles »
#TrumpDossier: It’s Not a ‘Bombshell’ You Moronic Hypocrites – IR.net
 


IR.net
#TrumpDossier: It’s Not a ‘Bombshell’ You Moronic Hypocrites
IR.net
Ok, so maybe I got a little bit carried away with the title of this piece, but as I watched conservative news last night, I counted at least seven times that I puked a little bit in my mouth. As the largest investigation into a sitting President, that 
Revealed: How Hillary paid for notorious ‘golden showers’ dossier on Trump: Her campaign lawyer funded dirty tricks …Daily Mail
Hillary Clinton’s campaign ‘paid for’ notorious Donald Trump dossierNew Zealand Heraldall 138 news articles »

Anthony Weiner Will Do Prison Time In Massachusetts – Forward
 

Anthony Weiner Will Do Prison Time In Massachusetts
Forward
Anthony Weiner will reportedly be spending his prison time for sexting minors at a federal medical center in Massachusetts. The disgraced ex-congressman has been assigned to the Federal Medical Center, Devens, a federal medical center with an adjacent … 

Trump Was Showered With Russian Flags by a Protester Shouting ‘Treason,’ Video Shows – Newsweek
 


Newsweek
Trump Was Showered With Russian Flags by a Protester Shouting ‘Treason,’ Video Shows
Newsweek
The incident came as Trump deals with the investigation into his campaign’s alleged links to Russia, as well as the Trump administration blowing past a deadline to sanction Russians over meddling in last year’s election. Trump has repeatedly beenand more »

‘Trump Is Treason!’: Protester Throws Russian Flags At President

A liberal activist infiltrated a press area outside a Senate GOP lunch.
Launch probes! Congressional GOPers try desperately to take focus off Trump – CNN
 


CNN
Launch probes! Congressional GOPers try desperately to take focus off Trump
CNN
To be clear: House Republicans are totally within their rights to open these probes. Doing so is one of the luxuries of being in the majority in the House (and Senate). (Related: The ability to open these sorts of congressional investigations is why 
House GOP launches probes into Obama-era uranium deal, Clinton email inquiryWashington Post
House GOP opens probe into DOJ’s Clinton investigationPolitico 
Republicans open investigations into Clinton uranium deal and Obama DOJABC News
Los Angeles TimesUSA TODAY
 
House Republicans launch two new investigations tied to Hillary ClintonUSA TODAY
 News & Observer
 
all 161
 
ABC News
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GOP opens investigation into Obama Justice Department – The Mercury News
 


The Mercury News
GOP opens investigation into Obama Justice Department
The Mercury News
The lack of charges remains a lingering grievance for Trump, who for months has held it up as an example of a riggedcriminal justice system that shielded his Democratic opponent from punishment for her use of a private server for government business.
White House: Justice Department should ‘look at’ prosecuting ComeySTLtoday.com 
As Panel Questions Trump Associates, GOP Launches New ProbesNBC 7 San Diego
Satire: Russia Investigation Will End Trump PresidencyLiberty Nation (satire) (blog)
all 93 

all 7 news articles »

Putin at Valdai: A Deep Dive Into Long-Standing Grievances – EurasiaNet
 


CNSNews.com (blog)
Putin at Valdai: A Deep Dive Into Long-Standing Grievances
EurasiaNet
During his October 19 appearance at the Valdai Club, Russian President Vladimir Putin focused on the past to a disconcerting degree, reiterating Russia’s long-standing complaints about the US and exhibiting a conspiratorial mindset, but provided no 
Hillary Clinton Says This Political Adversary Was ‘a Pretty Clear Exhibit of Sexism in Motion’CNSNews.com (blog)
Russia-China Tandem Changes the WorldConsortium Newsall 129 89 news articles »

Today’s Headlines and Commentary

The Trump administration will allow refugee admissions from all countries to resume and will put in place stricter screening measures, the Wall Street Journal reported. The refugee program was put on hold this summer as part of the administrations travel ban for a 120-day period that expires on Tuesday. The increased vetting measures will include more extensive collection of biographical data and investigation into applicants social media history.Senator John McCain called for a new congressional authorization for the use of military force for U.S. military operations overseas, Politico reported. McCain, the chairman of the Senate Armed Forces Committee, said the recent deaths of four U.S. soldiers in Niger called into question the extent of U.S. military operations around the globe. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Secretary of Defense James Mattis will testify at a Senate hearing on the authorization for the use of military force next week.

Pakistans prime minister pledged to support U.S. counterrorism efforts during a meeting on Tuesday with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Reuters reported. Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi affirmed Pakistans continued support for the war against terror and said the country had produced results in efforts against Al Qaeda and the Taliban.

The State Department warned Myanmars military leadership that it held them accountable for atrocities committed against the Rohingya ethnic minority, Reuters reported. A spokesperson for the State Department said on Monday it is considering targeted sanctions measures against officials that have facilitated human rights abuses. More than 600,000 Rohingya have left Myanmar as refugees since the crisis began.

Michael Cohen, a former attorney for President Trump, will speak with congressional investigators from the House and Senate intelligence committees this week, NBC News reported. In August, NPR reported that Cohen contacted Russian government officials to get assistance with a permit for a Trump real estate deal in Moscow.

The U.S.-led coalition in Syria denied striking Syrian-government held positions in Deir al-Zour city, according to Reuters reported.  Syrian state television accused the coalition of carrying out airstrikes that killed at least 14 people on Monday. A coalition spokesperson said its air forces had not conducted any strikes in the Syrian-government held parts of the city.

The Department of Justice will allow tech companies to alert their customers to law enforcement requests for their personal data, Ars Technica reported. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein said in a memo last week that the department would drop its practice of requiring gag orders for companies that surrender customer data to legal authorities. In response, Microsoft dropped a lawsuit against the Department of Justice challenging the gag orders.

British lawmakers asked Facebook for information about Russia-linked advertisements on its platform during the Brexit vote and 2017 parliamentary elections, Reuters reported on Tuesday.  Damian Collins, the head of a parliamentary inquiry into false and misleading news stories, made the request as part of an effort to understand the impact of foreign actors on social media.

A military judge ordered the civilian defense team for Rahim al-Nashiri back to the military court after the lawyers quit last week over ethical conflicts, the Miami Herald reported. Judge Vance Spath contradicted militarys chief defense counsel Gen. John Bakers order to dismiss the civilian members of al-Nashiris defense team. Baker had dismissed the lawyers after they brought up an ethical conflict of interest over a classified matter. Judge Spath ordered the attorneys to appear at the next court hearing in two weeks.

Iraqi militias launched an offensive against a Kurdish-held oil pipeline hub near the Turkish border on Tuesday, Reuters reported. Kurdish forces pledged to defend the area, which is a conduit for oil exports that provide vital revenue to the Kurdish Regional Government.

A bipartisan group of senators will introduce a bill that would require the FBI to obtain warrants to search data collected under the authority of Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, Reuters reported. Senators Ron Wyden and Rand Paul said their bill to reauthorize the intelligence communitys surveillance authorities under Section 702 would include more transparency and oversight mechanisms. It would allow individuals to more easily challenge surveillance in court and would expand the role of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board.

 

ICYMI: Yesterday on Lawfare

Matthew Kahn analyzed the legislative history behind the 25th Amendment and its applications in cases of presidential disability.

Josh Blackman argued that the Hawaii District Courts injunction against the most recent travel ban order does pass the rational basis test.

Vanessa Sauter posted a letter from a group of former national security officials urging the reauthorization of FISA Section 702 surveillance authorities.

Sabrina McCubbin summarized pre-trial motions in Smith v. Trump, a case challenging the application of the 2001 AUMF to the Islamic State.

Rick Ledgett argued that the only way for Kasperksy to regain users trust would be for it allow independent monitoring of all its anti-virus activities.

Matthew Kahn flagged a draft Section 702 reauthorization bill from the Senate intelligence committee.

Garrett Hinck described a strange sequence of events related to exiled Chinese billionaire Guo Wengui and the Trump administration.

 

Email the Roundup Team noteworthy law and security-related articles to include, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook for additional commentary on these issues. Sign up to receive Lawfare in your inbox. Visit ourEvents Calendar to learn about upcoming national security events, and check out relevant job openings on ourJob Board.

Michael Bloomberg: Brexit is stupidest thing any country has done besides Trump

Exclusive: Billionaire media mogul says it is hard to understand why a country doing so well wanted to ruin itMichael Bloomberg, the billionaire media mogul and former mayor of New York, has said Brexit is the single stupidest thing any country has ever done apart from the election of Donald Trump as US president.

Bloomberg The 75-year old argued that it is really hard to understand why a country that was doing so well wanted to ruin it with the Brexit vote, in a series of outspoken remarks made at a technology conference in Boston a fortnight ago.

Related: With evidence of a failing Brexit, who needs prophecy? | Rafael Behr

Related: Trump won’t stop Americans hitting the Paris climate targets. Here’s how we do it | Michael Bloomberg

Continue reading…

Protester Throws Russian Flags At Trump As He Arrives For Capitol Hill Tax Lunch – NPR
 


NPR
Protester Throws Russian Flags At Trump As He Arrives For Capitol Hill Tax Lunch
NPR
President Trump was met by a protester who threw Russian flags at him and chanted “Trump is treason!” as he arrived on Capitol Hill to urge Senate Republicans to pass tax cuts. While the president was entering the weekly GOP lunch on Capitol Hill, …
Protester Throws Russian Flags at Trump Inside CapitolNBCNews.com
Protester throws Russian flags at President Donald Trump before Capitol Hill lunchABC News
Protester Throws Russian Flags at Trump: ‘Treason!’Daily Beast
Fox News –Bloomberg –The Week Magazine
all 68 news articles »

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FEATURED POSTS: 7:57 AM 9/20/2017 – PUTIN’S PRO-TRUMP OPERATION MAY HAVE BEEN FAR BIGGER THAN WE YET KNOW – MOTHER JONES | ANATOMY OF A RUSSIAN ATTACK

“We don’t know what these Facebook ads looked like, we don’t know who they were targeting, and we don’t know how many millions of Americans may have been exposed to them.”

Putin’s Pro-Trump Operation May Have Been Far Bigger Than We Yet Know
Did the Kremlin help make Trump the “first Facebook president”?
BILL BUZENBERG – SEP. 20, 2017 6:00 AM

M.N.: And we have to know the answers to these and many other questions. 

Image result for Big Brother Trump

12:26 PM 9/20/2017 – “Political marketing” and possible use of the “psychotronic weapons” techniques in targeted advertising

_________________________________

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10:06 AM 10/26/2017 – Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split

10:06 AM 10/26/2017 – Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split

republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump split – Google Search

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Story image for republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump split from Vox

2 Breitbart alumni just abandoned the most Pro-Trump candidate of …

VoxOct 23, 2017
Kelli Ward, the Republican primary challenger to Sen. … ideological and strategic war playing out inside the Republican Party. … taking down one anti-Trump Republican and replacing him with a Trump acolyte. … But the real energy behind “anti-establishment” candidates might not be Bannon orBreitbart.

Story image for republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump split from WND.com

GOP senators ‘risk careers’ in stunning anti-Trump revolt

<a href=”http://WND.com” rel=”nofollow”>WND.com</a>Oct 25, 2017
GOP senators ‘risk careers’ in stunning anti-Trump revolt … “I can tell you no president, Democrat orRepublican in recent memory has … of respondents said another person should represent the Republican Party on the ticket. …. There is no big revolt and the whiners were never pro-Trump or pro-us.

Story image for republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump split from Sun Sentinel

Trump’s re-election edge is greatly exaggerated | Opinion

Sun SentinelOct 23, 2017
The Republican party remains split between an establishment class and pro-Trump nationalists as groups aligned with the conservative …
Read the whole story
· ·

republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump – Google Search

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Story image for republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump from New York Times

As GOP Bends Toward Trump, Critics Either Give In or Give Up

New York Times15 hours ago
In some cases, the retirement of an anti-Trump Republican could … The Grand Old Party risks a longer-term transformation into the Party of Trump. … to accommodate the president to survive primaries from the pro-Trump right.
GOP senators ‘risk careers’ in stunning anti-Trump revolt
<a href=”http://WND.com” rel=”nofollow”>WND.com</a>Oct 25, 2017
Courage in Short Supply
Commentary Magazine22 hours ago

Media image for republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump from Fox News

Fox News

Media image for republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump from Washington Examiner

Washington Examiner

Media image for republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump from Toronto Star

Toronto Star

Media image for republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump from WND.com

WND.com

Media image for republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump from Commentary Magazine

Commentary Magazine

Media image for republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump from durhamregion.com

durhamregion.com

Story image for republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump from Investor's Business Daily

The Delusional Optimism On Both Sides Of The Political Aisle

Investor’s Business DailyOct 25, 2017
But it’s not politically or morally wise for Trump to begin a public firefight with a grieving widow. So why are so many Republicans cheering him on? … without a major third-party candidate in contention (President Jimmy Carter …
Read the whole story
· · · ·

More than 2 months after declaring an opioid crisis, Trump appears to have decided how to proceed

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Welcome to Mic’s daily read on Donald Trump’s America. Want to receive this as a daily email in your inbox? Subscribe here.

Every day, we bring you a different dispatch on Trump’s America. Today’s focus: Opioid deja vu.

Thursday’s Dispatch: More than two months later, action on the opioid crisis

Thursday’s presidential press conference will be a prime example of how Donald Trump runs the federal government.

More than two months after Trump declared the opioid crisis “a national emergency,” as of last week, the government had still not formally declared a national emergency. That designation would send additional federal funds to hospitals, addiction clinics and first responders dealing with the historic rate of opioid-driven drug overdoses in America.

Nearly two weeks ago, Mic asked the White House for an update on the emergency declaration. The Trump administration issued Mic the same statement that had been issued in August, saying the government was focused on opioids and already treating it like an emergency.

As with health care, tax reform and a host of other initiatives, Trump’s rhetoric on opioids has been long detached from his administration’s policy initiatives.

The president said last week that he would soon formally declare a national emergency over opioids. Now, reports indicate the president will declare the crisis a public health emergency — but stop short of the more sweeping declaration.

The public health emergency will do less than a more sweeping national emergency. It will have to be renewed every 90 days. It will not provide federal funding for addiction treatment centers with more than 16 beds, a key recommendation of Trump’s own opioid commission.

“I think our general feeling is, that’s a good step, but it’s a temporary step, and it’s a transitional step,” Jim Blumenstock, chief of health security for the Association of State and Territorial Health Officers, told USA Today. Trump’s public health declaration is not expected to come with a further ask of money from Congress, which could designate funds to get more life-saving naloxone into the hands of first responders.

The cold reality: Nearly 65,000 people died of drug overdoses between February 2016 and February 2017, the most recent data available. That’s more people than were killed in car accidents last year.

Watch for Trump’s speech on the opioid crisis at 2 p.m. Eastern.

Thursday in Trump’s America:

Establishment Republicans know they’re fighting for their lives. After very public rebukes of Trump by Sens. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) and Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), the GOP is launching an assault on Steve Bannon to protect other Republican incumbents up for reelection next year, the Washington Post reported. Bannon and his wealthy allies are sensing the opportunity to pick off multiple Republican senators in a bid to drive the GOP to become more nationalist and isolationist.

The average premium increase of the most popular plans purchased on Obamacare’s individual health care exchange will be 34% next year, a new study said. That’s driven by instability in the marketplace created by Trump’s decision to end subsidies to health insurers and general anxiety surrounding the Affordable Care Act’s future.

And the bipartisan legislation that would stabilize the marketplace — which Trump opposes — would cut $3.8 billion from the deficit.

USA Today reported the new U.S. refugee admission program could block nearly half of the people seeking to come to the United States this year compared to last.

The Republican candidate running for governor in Virginia is running anti-immigrant ads as he aims to pull off an upset in the gubernatorial race. Will it work? And Mic broke down how a new Democratic super PAC is trying to win back state legislatures — starting with a data-driven prototype in next month’s Virginia election.

Why the Senate’s late-night vote on an obscure financial regulation will make it harder for you to fight for your money back.

What to know about who Donald Trump may pick at the next chair of the Federal Reserve. (Bored by monetary policy? Give this a click.)

House Republicans are barreling toward passage of a budget that would pave the way for tax reform — and $1.5 trillion in tax cuts. The Senate passed it last week.

Sometime today, the National Archives will post thousands of documents related to the John F. Kennedy murder investigation. Continually update this webpage.

Shortly after being slammed by a hurricane, Puerto Rico signed a $300 million contract with a two-person energy company based in the Montana hometown of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. Now, San Juan’s mayor said the contract should be voided — and Whitefish Energy apologized for feuding with her.

“I’m a very intelligent person.” Trump said journalists are making him out to be “more uncivil” than he actually is.

Today’s MicBite:

The feud that has consumed the last few weeks: Trump vs. Corker, a history. Tap or click below to watch.

Read the whole story
· · · ·

Escalating Its Russia Probe, Senate Committee Follows The Money

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A congressional committee investigating Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election has stepped up its probe over the past month, requesting that an agency that combats financial crime turn over confidential banking information on nearly 40 individuals and businesses, including at least nine who are American, BuzzFeed News has learned.

Senator Chuck Grassley, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, sent a letter to the Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network — FinCEN for short — on September 29, seeking information about any suspicious financial transactions banks may have flagged on the individuals and businesses since Jan 2015. Banks are required by law to flag such transactions for FinCEN.

The Judiciary Committee is one of three congressional committees looking into Russian interference. Its investigation only recently got off the ground after months spent negotiating the scope of its probe, two staffers told BuzzFeed News, and a rift has reportedly been developing between Grassley and Dianne Feinstein, the top Democrat on the committee. Feinstein did not sign the letter.

“The Senate Judiciary Committee is conducting an investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, as well as the Department of Justice’s enforcement of the Foreign Agents Registration Act,” Grassley’s letter says. “I am requesting a copy of any and all documents relating to Suspicious Activity Reports (SARs) that have been filed regarding the following individuals or entities.” They include:

  • Rinat Akhmetshin, and Natalia Veselnitskaya, the Russian-American lobbyist and the Russian lawyer who met with Donald Trump, Jr. at Trump Tower in June 2016.
  • Robert Arakelian, another lobbyist who works with Akhmetshin.
  • Human Rights Accountability Global Initiative Foundation, the Washington, DC-based nonprofit headed by Veselnitskaya whose stated goal is to “restart American adoption of Russian children” but has lobbied to repeal the Magnitsky Act, the 2012 law that imposed sanctions on Russian officials.
  • Glenn Simpson, Thomas Catan, Peter Fritsch and their private investigation firm Fusion GPS, which commissioned the so-called “dossier” that alleged the Russian government had been “cultivating, supporting and assisting” President Donald Trump.
  • Christopher Steele, the former British intelligence agent who collected the intelligence for the dossier; his business partner, Christopher Burrows; and their firm Orbis Business Intelligence.
  • Perkins Coie, a law firm that reportedly retained and paid Fusion GPS on behalf of the Clinton campaign for research that ended up in the dossier.
  • Prevezon Holdings, a Russian-owned company that was charged with money laundering and settled with the Department of Justice earlier this year, and eight of its related companies.
  • The law firm Baker Hostetler, which was hired to defend Prevezon, and two of the firm’s attorneys, John Moscow and Mark Cymrot.

Banks, hedge funds, casinos, and other financial institutions are required under the Bank Secrecy Act to file suspicious activity reports with FinCEN when money laundering or fraud is suspected. They are also required to file SARs for certain cash or wire transactions of $10,000 or more, even if those transactions seem legitimate. SARs contain personal financial information, such as bank account numbers and a record of financial transactions. FinCEN may not have SARs on all the individuals and businesses the Committee named.

A spokesperson for Grassley, Michael Zona, did not respond to requests for comment about the committee’s investigation. Simpson, the Fusion GPS co-founder, declined to comment. Simpson’s business partners, Fritsch and Catan, did not respond to requests for comment. Burrows declined to comment on behalf of himself, Steele, and Orbis. Neither Cymrot nor a spokesperson for Baker Hostetler responded to requests for comment. Moscow, the other Baker Hostetler attorney, declined to comment. Akhmetshin, Arakelian, and Veselnitskaya also did not respond to requests for comment. Officials at Prevezon could not be reached. A spokesperson for Perkins Coie said that the firm “rigorously adheres to all laws and regulations including those that protect the integrity of our financial systems, and any suggestion that the law firm has acted inappropriately is wholly unfounded.”

Grassley’s letter set an October 13 deadline for FinCEN to turn over the financial information to his committee. But according to three sources, no suspicious activity reports have been sent to the committee.

Jason Leopold is a senior investigative reporter for BuzzFeed News and is based in LA. Recipient: IRE 2016 FOI award; Newseum Institute National Freedom of Information Hall of Fame. PGP fingerprint 46DB 0712 284B 8C6E 40FF 7A1B D3CD 5720 694B 16F0. Contact this reporter at <a href=”mailto:jason.leopold@buzzfeed.com”>jason.leopold@buzzfeed.com</a>

Contact Jason Leopold at jason.leopold@buzzfeed.com.

Got a confidential tip? Submit it here.

Read the whole story
· · ·

Senate Committee Escalates Russia Probe, Digs Into Finances Of Nearly 40 Individuals And Businesses – BuzzFeed News

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BuzzFeed News
Senate Committee Escalates Russia Probe, Digs Into Finances Of Nearly 40 Individuals And Businesses
BuzzFeed News
A congressional committee investigating Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential electionhas stepped up its probe over the past month, requesting that an agency that combats financial crime turn over confidential banking information on nearly 40 …and more »

trump russian candidate – Google News: The Trump wing of the GOP is winning battles. But will it lose the war to keep the Senate in Republican hands? – Los Angeles Times

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Los Angeles Times
The Trump wing of the GOP is winning battles. But will it lose the war to keep the Senate in Republican hands?
Los Angeles Times
Sen. Jeff Flake’s surprise decision against seeking reelection marked a major victory for Stephen K. Bannon and his pirate band of Republicans. But the larger question Wednesday was whether the insurgency will cost the GOP its thin majority on Capitol 
The unfair criticism that Sen. Flake’s anti-Trumpism speech was too little, too lateWashington Post
Flake drops out of Senate race, torches Trump in speechThe Hill
The liberal-left divide reshaping American politicsThe Guardianall 4,085 news articles »

 trump russian candidate – Google News

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Russian Facebook ads made no difference in the election – Standard-Examiner

1 Share

OregonLive.com
Russian Facebook ads made no difference in the election
Standard-Examiner
The Trump campaign spent around $90 million on digital in 2016. Hillary Clinton employed a … If the Russians are going to decide our elections on social media, one assumes it will require at least a little originality. One suspicion has been that the 
Lowry: US democracy not for sale to RussiaBoston Herald
Rich Lowry: The Facebook farceOregonLive.comall 16 news articles »

Trump Investigations Report: 6:51 AM 10/26/2017 – Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. – The Washington Post 

1 Share

10.26.17 Russia-NATO Council To Discuss Ukraine, Afghanistan Report: Putin’s ‘Inner Circle’ Worth Nearly $24 Billion Reagan’s Son: Donald Trump Is A ‘Danger To The World’ And Must Be Removed | HuffPost Why Clinton Camp’s Funding of the Trump Dossier Matters – Bloomberg Julian Assange Says WikiLeaks Rejected Request From Trump-Linked Firm | HuffPost Donald Trump … Continue reading “6:51 AM 10/26/2017 – Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. – The Washington Post”

 Trump Investigations Report

Russian Intelligence services – Google News: America Asleep at the Keyboard as Cyber Warfare Gets Real – Freepress Online

1 Share

Freepress Online
America Asleep at the Keyboard as Cyber Warfare Gets Real
Freepress Online
In 2015, shortly after Fancy Bear was unleashed and started roaming around the DNC network, the hack was detected by the allied intelligence service monitoring Russian cyberespionage. They alerted U.S. intelligence, and the intel made its way to the and more »

 Russian Intelligence services – Google News

The Early Edition: October 26, 2017 

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9:49 AM 10/26/2017 – More than 2 months after declaring an opioid crisis, Trump appears to have decided how to proceed – Mic

More than 2 months after declaring an opioid crisis, Trump appears to have decided how to proceed

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Welcome to Mic’s daily read on Donald Trump’s America. Want to receive this as a daily email in your inbox? Subscribe here.

Every day, we bring you a different dispatch on Trump’s America. Today’s focus: Opioid deja vu.

Thursday’s Dispatch: More than two months later, action on the opioid crisis

Thursday’s presidential press conference will be a prime example of how Donald Trump runs the federal government.

More than two months after Trump declared the opioid crisis “a national emergency,” as of last week, the government had still not formally declared a national emergency. That designation would send additional federal funds to hospitals, addiction clinics and first responders dealing with the historic rate of opioid-driven drug overdoses in America.

Nearly two weeks ago, Mic asked the White House for an update on the emergency declaration. The Trump administration issued Mic the same statement that had been issued in August, saying the government was focused on opioids and already treating it like an emergency.

As with health care, tax reform and a host of other initiatives, Trump’s rhetoric on opioids has been long detached from his administration’s policy initiatives.

The president said last week that he would soon formally declare a national emergency over opioids. Now, reports indicate the president will declare the crisis a public health emergency — but stop short of the more sweeping declaration.

The public health emergency will do less than a more sweeping national emergency. It will have to be renewed every 90 days. It will not provide federal funding for addiction treatment centers with more than 16 beds, a key recommendation of Trump’s own opioid commission.

“I think our general feeling is, that’s a good step, but it’s a temporary step, and it’s a transitional step,” Jim Blumenstock, chief of health security for the Association of State and Territorial Health Officers, told USA Today. Trump’s public health declaration is not expected to come with a further ask of money from Congress, which could designate funds to get more life-saving naloxone into the hands of first responders.

The cold reality: Nearly 65,000 people died of drug overdoses between February 2016 and February 2017, the most recent data available. That’s more people than were killed in car accidents last year.

Watch for Trump’s speech on the opioid crisis at 2 p.m. Eastern.

Thursday in Trump’s America:

Establishment Republicans know they’re fighting for their lives. After very public rebukes of Trump by Sens. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) and Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), the GOP is launching an assault on Steve Bannon to protect other Republican incumbents up for reelection next year, the Washington Post reported. Bannon and his wealthy allies are sensing the opportunity to pick off multiple Republican senators in a bid to drive the GOP to become more nationalist and isolationist.

The average premium increase of the most popular plans purchased on Obamacare’s individual health care exchange will be 34% next year, a new study said. That’s driven by instability in the marketplace created by Trump’s decision to end subsidies to health insurers and general anxiety surrounding the Affordable Care Act’s future.

And the bipartisan legislation that would stabilize the marketplace — which Trump opposes — would cut $3.8 billion from the deficit.

USA Today reported the new U.S. refugee admission program could block nearly half of the people seeking to come to the United States this year compared to last.

The Republican candidate running for governor in Virginia is running anti-immigrant ads as he aims to pull off an upset in the gubernatorial race. Will it work? And Mic broke down how a new Democratic super PAC is trying to win back state legislatures — starting with a data-driven prototype in next month’s Virginia election.

Why the Senate’s late-night vote on an obscure financial regulation will make it harder for you to fight for your money back.

What to know about who Donald Trump may pick at the next chair of the Federal Reserve. (Bored by monetary policy? Give this a click.)

House Republicans are barreling toward passage of a budget that would pave the way for tax reform — and $1.5 trillion in tax cuts. The Senate passed it last week.

Sometime today, the National Archives will post thousands of documents related to the John F. Kennedy murder investigation. Continually update this webpage.

Shortly after being slammed by a hurricane, Puerto Rico signed a $300 million contract with a two-person energy company based in the Montana hometown of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. Now, San Juan’s mayor said the contract should be voided — and Whitefish Energy apologized for feuding with her.

“I’m a very intelligent person.” Trump said journalists are making him out to be “more uncivil” than he actually is.

Today’s MicBite:

The feud that has consumed the last few weeks: Trump vs. Corker, a history. Tap or click below to watch.

Read the whole story
· · · ·

Escalating Its Russia Probe, Senate Committee Follows The Money

1 Share

A congressional committee investigating Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election has stepped up its probe over the past month, requesting that an agency that combats financial crime turn over confidential banking information on nearly 40 individuals and businesses, including at least nine who are American, BuzzFeed News has learned.

Senator Chuck Grassley, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, sent a letter to the Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network — FinCEN for short — on September 29, seeking information about any suspicious financial transactions banks may have flagged on the individuals and businesses since Jan 2015. Banks are required by law to flag such transactions for FinCEN.

The Judiciary Committee is one of three congressional committees looking into Russian interference. Its investigation only recently got off the ground after months spent negotiating the scope of its probe, two staffers told BuzzFeed News, and a rift has reportedly been developing between Grassley and Dianne Feinstein, the top Democrat on the committee. Feinstein did not sign the letter.

“The Senate Judiciary Committee is conducting an investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, as well as the Department of Justice’s enforcement of the Foreign Agents Registration Act,” Grassley’s letter says. “I am requesting a copy of any and all documents relating to Suspicious Activity Reports (SARs) that have been filed regarding the following individuals or entities.” They include:

  • Rinat Akhmetshin, and Natalia Veselnitskaya, the Russian-American lobbyist and the Russian lawyer who met with Donald Trump, Jr. at Trump Tower in June 2016.
  • Robert Arakelian, another lobbyist who works with Akhmetshin.
  • Human Rights Accountability Global Initiative Foundation, the Washington, DC-based nonprofit headed by Veselnitskaya whose stated goal is to “restart American adoption of Russian children” but has lobbied to repeal the Magnitsky Act, the 2012 law that imposed sanctions on Russian officials.
  • Glenn Simpson, Thomas Catan, Peter Fritsch and their private investigation firm Fusion GPS, which commissioned the so-called “dossier” that alleged the Russian government had been “cultivating, supporting and assisting” President Donald Trump.
  • Christopher Steele, the former British intelligence agent who collected the intelligence for the dossier; his business partner, Christopher Burrows; and their firm Orbis Business Intelligence.
  • Perkins Coie, a law firm that reportedly retained and paid Fusion GPS on behalf of the Clinton campaign for research that ended up in the dossier.
  • Prevezon Holdings, a Russian-owned company that was charged with money laundering and settled with the Department of Justice earlier this year, and eight of its related companies.
  • The law firm Baker Hostetler, which was hired to defend Prevezon, and two of the firm’s attorneys, John Moscow and Mark Cymrot.

Banks, hedge funds, casinos, and other financial institutions are required under the Bank Secrecy Act to file suspicious activity reports with FinCEN when money laundering or fraud is suspected. They are also required to file SARs for certain cash or wire transactions of $10,000 or more, even if those transactions seem legitimate. SARs contain personal financial information, such as bank account numbers and a record of financial transactions. FinCEN may not have SARs on all the individuals and businesses the Committee named.

A spokesperson for Grassley, Michael Zona, did not respond to requests for comment about the committee’s investigation. Simpson, the Fusion GPS co-founder, declined to comment. Simpson’s business partners, Fritsch and Catan, did not respond to requests for comment. Burrows declined to comment on behalf of himself, Steele, and Orbis. Neither Cymrot nor a spokesperson for Baker Hostetler responded to requests for comment. Moscow, the other Baker Hostetler attorney, declined to comment. Akhmetshin, Arakelian, and Veselnitskaya also did not respond to requests for comment. Officials at Prevezon could not be reached. A spokesperson for Perkins Coie said that the firm “rigorously adheres to all laws and regulations including those that protect the integrity of our financial systems, and any suggestion that the law firm has acted inappropriately is wholly unfounded.”

Grassley’s letter set an October 13 deadline for FinCEN to turn over the financial information to his committee. But according to three sources, no suspicious activity reports have been sent to the committee.

Jason Leopold is a senior investigative reporter for BuzzFeed News and is based in LA. Recipient: IRE 2016 FOI award; Newseum Institute National Freedom of Information Hall of Fame. PGP fingerprint 46DB 0712 284B 8C6E 40FF 7A1B D3CD 5720 694B 16F0. Contact this reporter at <a href=”mailto:jason.leopold@buzzfeed.com”>jason.leopold@buzzfeed.com</a>

Contact Jason Leopold at jason.leopold@buzzfeed.com.

Got a confidential tip? Submit it here.

Read the whole story
· · ·

Senate Committee Escalates Russia Probe, Digs Into Finances Of Nearly 40 Individuals And Businesses – BuzzFeed News

1 Share

BuzzFeed News
Senate Committee Escalates Russia Probe, Digs Into Finances Of Nearly 40 Individuals And Businesses
BuzzFeed News
A congressional committee investigating Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential electionhas stepped up its probe over the past month, requesting that an agency that combats financial crime turn over confidential banking information on nearly 40 …

and more »

trump russian candidate – Google News: The Trump wing of the GOP is winning battles. But will it lose the war to keep the Senate in Republican hands? – Los Angeles Times

1 Share

Los Angeles Times
The Trump wing of the GOP is winning battles. But will it lose the war to keep the Senate in Republican hands?
Los Angeles Times
Sen. Jeff Flake’s surprise decision against seeking reelection marked a major victory for Stephen K. Bannon and his pirate band of Republicans. But the larger question Wednesday was whether the insurgency will cost the GOP its thin majority on Capitol 
The unfair criticism that Sen. Flake’s anti-Trumpism speech was too little, too lateWashington Post
Flake drops out of Senate race, torches Trump in speechThe Hill
The liberal-left divide reshaping American politicsThe Guardian

all 4,085 news articles »

 trump russian candidate – Google News

Russian Facebook ads made no difference in the election – Standard-Examiner

1 Share

OregonLive.com
Russian Facebook ads made no difference in the election
Standard-Examiner
The Trump campaign spent around $90 million on digital in 2016. Hillary Clinton employed a … If the Russians are going to decide our elections on social media, one assumes it will require at least a little originality. One suspicion has been that the 
Lowry: US democracy not for sale to RussiaBoston Herald
Rich Lowry: The Facebook farceOregonLive.com

all 16 news articles »

Trump Investigations Report: 6:51 AM 10/26/2017 – Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. – The Washington Post 

1 Share
10.26.17 Russia-NATO Council To Discuss Ukraine, Afghanistan Report: Putin’s ‘Inner Circle’ Worth Nearly $24 Billion Reagan’s Son: Donald Trump Is A ‘Danger To The World’ And Must Be Removed | HuffPost Why Clinton Camp’s Funding of the Trump Dossier Matters – Bloomberg Julian Assange Says WikiLeaks Rejected Request From Trump-Linked Firm | HuffPost Donald Trump … Continue reading “6:51 AM 10/26/2017 – Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. – The Washington Post”

 Trump Investigations Report

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Russian Intelligence services – Google News: America Asleep at the Keyboard as Cyber Warfare Gets Real – Freepress Online

1 Share

Freepress Online
America Asleep at the Keyboard as Cyber Warfare Gets Real
Freepress Online
In 2015, shortly after Fancy Bear was unleashed and started roaming around the DNC network, the hack was detected by the allied intelligence service monitoring Russian cyberespionage. They alerted U.S. intelligence, and the intel made its way to the 

and more »

 Russian Intelligence services – Google News

The Early Edition: October 26, 2017 

Trump News Review

1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites)
organized crime and intelligence – Google News: JFK files out Thursday: What to expect from secret records on Kennedy assassination – USA TODAY
Donald Trump – Google News: Donald Trump expected to declare opioid crisis a public health emergency – PBS NewsHour
Donald Trump – Google News: Donald Trump expected to declare opioid crisis a public health emergency – PBS NewsHour
Post Politics: Trump plans to declare the opioid crisis a public health emergency
Just Security: Happy PATRIOT Act Day!
trump and russia – Google News: Yes, the Russia-Trump Investigation Is Real – NBCNews.com
calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News: Yes, the Russia-Trump Investigation Is Real – NBCNews.com
Trump Investigations Report: 8:40 AM 10/26/2017 The WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was approached by chief executive Alexander Nix of the data firm Cambridge Analytica | A U.S. District Court judge has given the opposition research firm Fusion GPS until today to answer a subpoena
US elections and russia – Google News: GOP tightens restrictions on Dana Rohrabacher’s subcommittee over Russia connections – Los Angeles Times
Russian Intelligence services and organized crime – Google News: Kremlin Says Russians Fighting Alongside Daesh Criminals Being Eliminated – Sputnik International
Russian Intelligence services and international organized crime and terrorism – Google News: Kremlin Says Russians Fighting Alongside Daesh Criminals Being Eliminated – Sputnik International
2016 elections and mental health – Google News: What It’s Like To Be A Woman Running For Local Office In Trump’s America – HuffPost
Trump Investigations Report: 8:13 AM 10/26/2017 The E-Curtain And Control of The Cyberspace
Donald Trump – Google News: Sen. Bob Corker: Criticism of Trump will ‘absolutely not’ affect my tax-reform vote – CNBC
Donald Trump: What Its Like To Be A Woman Running For Local Office In Trumps America
trump as danger to National Security – Google News: Ronald Reagan’s Son Says Trump Is ‘A Stain’ and Needs to be Impeached – Newsweek
trump electorate – Google News: Primary Colors in Red – Rasmussen Reports
Trump anxiety – Google News: Rodriguez’s public statement, students’ Trump anxiety, Trump’s ‘Ivy League’ defense: What’s new in education – Los Angeles Times
trump anxiety – Google News: Rodriguez’s public statement, students’ Trump anxiety, Trump’s ‘Ivy League’ defense: What’s new in education – Los Angeles Times
Russia influence in Eastern Europe – Google News: The Poet Laureate of Hybrid War – Foreign Policy (blog)

 

Saved Stories – 1. Trump
The Early Edition: October 26, 2017
Trump crosses another line – Washington Post
As panel questions Trump associates, GOP launches new probes – STLtoday.com
Republicans Launch New Investigations Into Clinton Email Probe, Uranium Deal – NPR
Republican committees investigate Clinton and Obama – BBC News
Republicans look past Trump scandals, zero in on Hillary Clinton – MSNBC
Robert Mueller Tightens Paul Manafort’s Noose – Vanity Fair
Clinton campaign, DNC paid for research that led to Russia dossier … – Washington Post
The Senate Judiciary Committee’s Russia Probe Just Blew Up – Mother Jones
Trump’s consistent refrain: There is not now and never will be proof of Russian collusion – MyAJC
Obama-era uranium deal yields new questions, new accusations and new investigation – WKBW-TV
BBC sparks outrage inviting former Trump aide Sebastian Gorka on Radio 4’s Today programme – The Independent
her purple eye sockets and swollen lips throbbing. It had been two days since she woke up to her ex-boyfriend … – WIRED
Addressing Russian Influence: What Can We Learn From U.S. Cold War Counter-Propaganda Efforts?
The Clinton camp and DNC funded what became the Trump-Russia dossier: Here’s what it means – Washington Post
#TrumpDossier: It’s Not a ‘Bombshell’ You Moronic Hypocrites – IR.net
Anthony Weiner Will Do Prison Time In Massachusetts – Forward
Trump Was Showered With Russian Flags by a Protester Shouting ‘Treason,’ Video Shows – Newsweek
‘Trump Is Treason!’: Protester Throws Russian Flags At President
Launch probes! Congressional GOPers try desperately to take focus off Trump – CNN
GOP opens investigation into Obama Justice Department – The Mercury News
Putin at Valdai: A Deep Dive Into Long-Standing Grievances – EurasiaNet
Today’s Headlines and Commentary
Michael Bloomberg: Brexit is stupidest thing any country has done besides Trump
Protester Throws Russian Flags At Trump As He Arrives For Capitol Hill Tax Lunch – NPR
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9:37 AM 10/26/2017 – Who Knew Trump Would Be a Weak President?

Saved Stories – Trump Investigations

Saved Stories – Trump Investigations
Senate Committee Escalates Russia Probe, Digs Into Finances Of Nearly 40 Individuals And Businesses – BuzzFeed News
roger stone – Google News: Trips to Mexico City, plots to kill Castro: What the JFK records are likely to reveal – New York Daily News
trump and intelligence community – Google News: A Chance to Control Domestic Spying – New Republic
trump russian candidate – Google News: The Trump wing of the GOP is winning battles. But will it lose the war to keep the Senate in Republican hands? – Los Angeles Times
Russian Facebook ads made no difference in the election – Standard-Examiner
Trump Investigations Report: 6:51 AM 10/26/2017 Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. The Washington Post
Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Getting Encryption onto the Front Burner
Trump’s and Putin’s connections with organized crime – Google News: Fights in Russia: Putin’s Acolytes Are Determined to Crush Navalny’s Opposition, One Activist at a Time – Newsweek
trump russian candidate – Google News: Orange County is turning blue. Can Dana Rohrabacher survive his chumminess with Trump? – Los Angeles Times
Trump Investigations Report: 7:04 AM 10/26/2017 Who is Bill Browder? by Seth Hettena
Russian Intelligence services – Google News: America Asleep at the Keyboard as Cyber Warfare Gets Real – Freepress Online
Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Rational Security: The How Many Elephants Make a Stampede? Edition
Putin and American political process – Google News: “Fake news is about selling you doubt”: Garry Kasparov on cyber security, automation and Putin – New Statesman
Do police officers shootings increase trump election chances? – Google News: James Comey Blames Donald Trump for Distracting From Police Violence and Uses Howard Talk to Announce Book … – Newsweek
Twitter nears first profitable quarter as it slashes expenses, shares jump – Reuters.com
Trump, Putin, and the Mob – Google News: Trolling President Donald Trump in Washington DC – Stuff.co.nz
Putin and the Mob – Google News: Trolling President Donald Trump in Washington DC – Stuff.co.nz
Russian Intelligence services and organized crime – Google News: Trump: ‘Sad Commentary’ that Clinton Campaign Paid for Research on His Past – Voice of America
morell on trump – Google News: Here’s How Clinton Campaign Cash Could Have Ended Up In The Hands Of Russian Operatives – The Daily Caller
trump and russia – Google News: Corker vows to get answers on Trump’s Russia sanctions delay – Politico
Russian Intelligence services – Google News: Time for the Feds to Say What They Know About Kaspersky – WIRED
trump criminal investigation – Google News: How Steve Bannon and Sean Hannity ginned up the Hillary Clinton uranium story – Salon
Donald Trump: Bob Corker Wasnt Always Anti-Trump
Paul Ryan accuses Trump administration of ‘stonewalling’ requests on Russia dossier – The Independent

 

Saved Stories – Trump Investigations
Senate Committee Escalates Russia Probe, Digs Into Finances Of Nearly 40 Individuals And Businesses – BuzzFeed News
 


BuzzFeed News
Senate Committee Escalates Russia Probe, Digs Into Finances Of Nearly 40 Individuals And Businesses
BuzzFeed News
A congressional committee investigating Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election has stepped up its probe over the past month, requesting that an agency that combats financial crime turn over confidential banking information on nearly 40 …and more »

roger stone – Google News: Trips to Mexico City, plots to kill Castro: What the JFK records are likely to reveal – New York Daily News
 


New York Daily News
Trips to Mexico City, plots to kill Castro: What the JFK records are likely to reveal
New York Daily News
Roger Stone, the longtime political adviser, told the Washington Examiner this week he convinced Trump to release the documents. Stone, who isn’t known to be related to Oliver Stone, once authored a book alleging Lyndon Johnson had Kennedy killed so …
What JFK assassination documents tell us about 1960s MiamiTampabay.com
On JFK documents, Trump squeezed over disclosureABC News
The JFK Files: More Than 50 Years of Questions, ConspiraciesVoice of America
Washington Post –CNN –The Week Magazine –Twitter
all 148 news articles »

 roger stone – Google News

calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News: Who Knew Trump Would Be a Weak President? – New Republic
 


New Republic
Who Knew Trump Would Be a Weak President?
New Republic
At his rallies, presidential candidate Donald Trump excited his most avid supporters through displays of toughness: his callswhen a demonstrator acted up to get him out of here; his incantations of his reality show signature You’re fired; his and more »

 calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News

trump and intelligence community – Google News: A Chance to Control Domestic Spying – New Republic
 


VICE News
A Chance to Control Domestic Spying
New Republic
In his first year in office, Donald Trump has achieved the seemingly impossible: By variously criticizing Barack Obama’s surveillance practices and promising to ramp up his own, he has managed to galvanize a bipartisan movement in Congress to curb the 
Senators want to reform a surveillance law before Trump renews itVICE News
Bipartisan Coalition Introduces USA RIGHTS Act to Reform Secretive Warrantless Spy Program | Press Releases | U.S. …Senator Ron Wyden
Senate Intelligence Committee Draft 702 Reauthorization Bill – LawfareLawfareall 89 news articles »

 trump and intelligence community – Google News

trump russian candidate – Google News: The Trump wing of the GOP is winning battles. But will it lose the war to keep the Senate in Republican hands? – Los Angeles Times
 


Los Angeles Times
The Trump wing of the GOP is winning battles. But will it lose the war to keep the Senate in Republican hands?
Los Angeles Times
Sen. Jeff Flake’s surprise decision against seeking reelection marked a major victory for Stephen K. Bannon and his pirate band of Republicans. But the larger question Wednesday was whether the insurgency will cost the GOP its thin majority on Capitol 
The unfair criticism that Sen. Flake’s anti-Trumpism speech was too little, too lateWashington Post
Flake drops out of Senate race, torches Trump in speechThe Hill
The liberal-left divide reshaping American politicsThe Guardianall 4,085 news articles »

 trump russian candidate – Google News

Russian Facebook ads made no difference in the election – Standard-Examiner
 


OregonLive.com
Russian Facebook ads made no difference in the election
Standard-Examiner
The Trump campaign spent around $90 million on digital in 2016. Hillary Clinton employed a … If the Russians are going to decide our elections on social media, one assumes it will require at least a little originality. One suspicion has been that the 
Lowry: US democracy not for sale to RussiaBoston Herald
Rich Lowry: The Facebook farceOregonLive.comall 16 news articles »

Trump Investigations Report: 6:51 AM 10/26/2017 Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. The Washington Post

10.26.17 Russia-NATO Council To Discuss Ukraine, Afghanistan Report: Putin’s ‘Inner Circle’ Worth Nearly $24 Billion Reagan’s Son: Donald Trump Is A ‘Danger To The World’ And Must Be Removed | HuffPost Why Clinton Camp’s Funding of the Trump Dossier Matters – Bloomberg Julian Assange Says WikiLeaks Rejected Request From Trump-Linked Firm | HuffPost Donald Trump … Continue reading“6:51 AM 10/26/2017 – Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. – The Washington Post” Trump Investigations Report
Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Getting Encryption onto the Front Burner

Im happy to be wrong, but I dont expect the Deputy Attorney Generals recent speech to spark productive engagement in the standoff over encryption. Federal, state and local authorities will keep highlighting their increasing inability to obtain critical data (in motion and at rest) by means of legal process and will try to demonstrate the critical public safety price they (meaning we) pay for warrant-proof platforms. Tech firms, for their part, will continue to focus on customer and shareholder value, which is both completely natural and consistent with widespread libertarian preferences in that sector. Recent calls for a congressional commissionusually a tactic for kicking a can down the roadappear to have receded. Apparently a decision has been made that this can will kick itself.In the meantime, the range of data and communications inaccessible to law enforcement and other regulators without the cooperation of customers and users will increase by leaps and bounds. We are fast moving from a world in which both the platform provider and the customer could access data to one where only the customer can. Its not just that Apple moved from an iPhone operating system that allowed the company to retrieve data from the device to one for which only the customer has the key, or that end-to-end encrypted messaging platforms like WhatsApp have become common. Its also the steady move to customer-controlled cloud encryption. Smartphone and user data that used to be backed up to cloudreducing, though not eliminating enforcers need to access the devicewill still be in cloud, but with access controlled by the consumer. The corporate data previously stored on company owned and controlled services, and thereafter moved to the cloud, will continue to reside these, but cloud providers will soon disable themselves from accessing it, even during computation.

We are thus moving to a world in which customers and users of all stripes become the exclusive gatekeepers of their own data and communications. For a range of customers and users, this state of affairs may not impede the many public safety and regulatory projects we rely on government to pursue. When presented with a warrant or other appropriate legal process, many firms and individuals will comply. Investigators, particularly in white collar investigations, frequently use subpoenae rather than search warrants, working through lawyers and firms and trusting that those on whom they serve process will comply. But when pursuing not just terrorism, violent crime, and child exploitation cases, but also many white collar ones, law enforcers justifiably lack this trust, and regularly fear the obstruction that ensues when a data request tips a target off, or some combination of partial compliance and deletion.

In an effort to avoid refighting the Crypto Wars, and recognizing the value of innovation and the problem with top-down mandates, Rosenstein, like former FBI Director James Comey, took pains not to demand any particular solution, looking only for some key management technique or other arrangement that the government could require the provider to draw on. Such access already exists when a providers business model requires a product to have itfor, say, key recovery (for devices), content scanning, or updatesand the Justice Department wants this to occur even absent that business model.

Perhaps because neither this White House nor Congress is ready to do anything, the DAG didnt quite call for legislation or regulation. Indeed, he quickly limited his proposal only to mass-market consumer devices and services that enable warrant-proof encryption by default and was pretty vague about how even those platforms would be addressed. He doubtless hopes that this move will spark some sort of voluntary compliance by industrythe specific consideration of public safety and other social costs.

If history is any guide, however, only actual legislative or regulatory proposals will spark constructive engagement. Signals from the Obama White House that the private sector took as meaning legislation was off the table helped ensure that nothing happened during the past administration. But one has only to look to the story of the Symphony messaging platform to see the effect of credible threats. When, soon after the prosecution of several banks for a foreign exchange bid-rigging conspiracy accomplished through chatroom conversations, a consortium of several large financial institutions started their own platform that touted end-to-end encryption and “guaranteed data deletion, New York States Department of Financial Services used its considerable regulatory power to intervene and demand that Symphony retain message data for seven years and that individual banks agreed to store decryption keys for the messages with independent custodians. They agreed, and Symphony flourishes, backed by a number of investors, including Google.

As my colleague Steve Bellovin regularly reminds me, crypto is hard, and any efforts to engineer access in the public interest might well add cybersecurity risks beyond those facedand rarely eliminatedby firms trying to engineer systems for their own purposes. Yet I would expect firms to build and deliver only those products their engineers tell them can be made securely and within the context of their own processes. And I question why we should normalize the risks firms take as they roll out products to serve their customers while problematizing those they would face if they were required to take social costs into account. Proofs of concepts for addressing the engineering challenges are beginning to circulate, and need to be carefully considered, even if they are not perceived as singular or complete solutions to these complex challenges.

The systems design challenges are even greater because of the international dimensions of any voluntary or compelled regime of exceptional access. Regulating devices sold around the world alone would be hard enough, as we need to consider the competitive disadvantage a U.S. mandate would place on firms. But at least obtaining data from a device with lawful process can be limited to the jurisdiction with control of that device. This is why, although the deputy attorney general lumped access to stored data on devices with access to in-flight encrypted real-time communications and messaging, progress (legislative or otherwise) may require dealing with the two on separate tracks. For no such restrictive principle can easily organize which jurisdiction has access to data in motion or data in a delocalized cloud.

Yet the international dimensions of the challenge are actually a reason for engagement, not forbearance. Consider the current state of play: Chinas encryption policy has been inexorably movingtoward mandated government access. To be sure, we dont look to China to set normative standards for balancing privacy and cybersecurity with public safety and other asserted public interests. But tech firms have been increasingly ready to accommodate Chinas sovereign demands, and there is no reason to expect that forbearance by the U.S. will be matched by forbearance by the Chinese Government, which has not been looking to the U.S. for guidance on cyberpolicy. And its not just China that is demanding full access to the data use and traffic of its citizens. Nor just Russia. In the United Kingdom, the Investigatory Powers Act allows the government to serve technical capability notices to obtain plaintext. Proposals for exceptional access legislation seem to be moving forward in Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Germany and France have asked for EU legislation. To be sure, the impact of this legislative wave cant yet be discerned, and the extent to which firms will actually be forced to engineer a solution to allow them access customer data, regardless of their current architecture, remains unclear. But trend is there, and one or more of these nations are surely an incident or two away from that.

Its a mistake to paint increasing governmental regulatory demands as simply the product of the security state. In liberal democracies, they are efforts to protect liberal values. Just as jurisdictions impose data protection rules on data flows to advance the autonomy of citizens, so will they seek access to data as means of denying impunity to individuals and entities that seek to exercise illegitimate power. Each countryliberal or illiberalwill have its own demands. Its hard to imagine what the result of these possibly conflicting demands will be. And customer and shareholder pressure from one country may force a vendor to change its operations in another. But the problem cannot be wished away.

Nor can the problem be fairly denied by pointing to some golden age of surveillancemetadata, IoT and GPS data and the likethat the government can use instead of content. The deputy attorney general did a nice job highlighting how content matters, both to exclude and include people from suspicion. Perhaps if non-content data comes to dominate the available evidence, juries will still regularly convict. But thats hardly a future to embrace.

Then there are those who think governmental hacking can substitute for a regime of authorized access. Its certainly true that on both the intelligence and the criminal investigation sides, the government will indeed work to identify and exploit vulnerabilities. But these methods cannot always be counted on. And those who would make them the primary recourse for federal, state and local authorities seeking to investigate criminal activity need to consider the implications of that approach.

A private market for hacking already exists. Do we want it to swell with the demands of federal, state and local authorities? Do we want a world in which an engineer (working for a company or open source) creates vulnerabilities that he can turn around and sell? We already face the risk of government hacking tools escaping. How much greater is the risk when the market expands? Moreover, if forced to rely on vulnerability exploitation, law enforcement cannot be expected to tolerate the disclosure of each tooldeveloped or boughtwhenever they bring a prosecution using its fruits. Authorities would justifiably push for a law-enforcement-sensitive version of CIPA, leaving defense lawyers to complain about their inability to fully litigate chain of custody and evidence integrity issues.

Larger issues of the governments relationships with others loom. We need more threat information sharing between government and industry, not less. But a world in which intelligence and criminal agencies need regularly to rely on vulnerability exploitation only increases the cost of sharing. Even now, one can question calls to move the Vulnerabilities Equities Process out of the White Housewhich can internalize all government intereststo Homeland Security, whose cybersecurity mission aligns it more closely to companies. Forcing law enforcers of all stripes to rely on hackingnot just to access data from the less popular platforms but from the ones that Americans most commonly usewould surely galvanize intelligence and law enforcement agencies even more against the move.

Then there is the governments relationship with its citizens. Even those troubled by the range of investigatory powers provided to law enforcement should prefer that the powers are clearly enumerated and understood so that we have full transparency on how those powers are exercised. We should not backtrack on the long road from black bag jobs and informal data sharing to Title III surveillance warrants and other formalized investigative processes. Citizens need to know the rules and, to the greatest extent possible, be able to determine compliance with them. A world in which hacking and its accompanying opacity becomes the rule, not the exception, for obtaining encrypted data takes a large step away from that goal, at a time when we can least afford further erosion of trust in government processes at all levels.

Any legislative proposals relating to encryption made in wake of a terrorist attack or other heinous crime will surely be condemned as product of moral panic. But in the US, at least, moral panics are often simply the way long-overdue policies get enacted. We only overreact or underreact, and rarely get it right. Lets try before the panic.

 Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices

Trump’s and Putin’s connections with organized crime – Google News: Fights in Russia: Putin’s Acolytes Are Determined to Crush Navalny’s Opposition, One Activist at a Time – Newsweek
 


Newsweek
Fights in Russia: Putin’s Acolytes Are Determined to Crush Navalny’s Opposition, One Activist at a Time
Newsweek
Skripnichenko’s death is part of a surge in politically motivated violence ahead of next March’s presidential elections, in which President Vladimir Putin is expected to seek a new six-year term. Tensions have … Riot police detain demonstrators and more »

 Trump’s and Putin’s connections with organized crime – Google News

trump russian candidate – Google News: Orange County is turning blue. Can Dana Rohrabacher survive his chumminess with Trump? – Los Angeles Times
 


Los Angeles Times
Orange County is turning blue. Can Dana Rohrabacher survive his chumminess with Trump?
Los Angeles Times
Candidate Trump rejected the sunny, libertarian-inflected conservatism of Ronald Reagan and steered the Republican Party toward a vulgar, anti-immigrant, anti-free-market populism. The approach helped get him into the White House. … A longtime 

 trump russian candidate – Google News

Trump Investigations Report: 7:04 AM 10/26/2017 Who is Bill Browder? by Seth Hettena

Who is Bill Browder? (Updated) Thursday October 26th, 2017 at 6:58 AM TrumP Россия 1 Share Bill Browder This much is clear: Vladimir Putin hates Bill Browder. Browder was once the largest foreign investor in Russia and, it needs to be said, a great admirer of the Russian president. Today, he is perhaps the Putins regimes fiercest critic, and … Continue reading“7:04 AM 10/26/2017 – Who is Bill Browder? – by Seth Hettena” Trump Investigations Report
Russian Intelligence services – Google News: America Asleep at the Keyboard as Cyber Warfare Gets Real – Freepress Online
 


Freepress Online
America Asleep at the Keyboard as Cyber Warfare Gets Real
Freepress Online
In 2015, shortly after Fancy Bear was unleashed and started roaming around the DNC network, the hack was detected by the allied intelligence service monitoring Russian cyberespionage. They alerted U.S. intelligence, and the intel made its way to the and more »

 Russian Intelligence services – Google News

Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Rational Security: The How Many Elephants Make a Stampede? Edition

We have a live studio audience this week at the Brookings Institution, where the gang discusses leading GOP lawmakers who say theres nothing normal about the Trump administration. The deaths of four Americans in Niger raise new questions about the legal footing of the U.S. fight against terrorism. And Attorney General Jeff Sessions seems to have no plan for future Russian election meddling. Plus, Tamara is celebrating the new journal launched by the folks at War on the Rocks this week. I say that C is for ‘cookie,’ and for ‘cannon.’ And Shane and Susan decide that Jim Comey should release an album.Have you helped us promote Rational Security yet? If not, please leave us a rating and a review on whatever podcast distribution system you use. A lot of people are visiting Lawfare and reaching our podcasts for the first time these days, so if you’re new to Lawfare and Rational Security, you can subscribe to the podcast using our RSS feed, or listen on iTunes, on Stitcher and now on Google Play.

 Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices

Putin and American political process – Google News: “Fake news is about selling you doubt”: Garry Kasparov on cyber security, automation and Putin – New Statesman
 

“Fake news is about selling you doubt”: Garry Kasparov on cyber security, automation and Putin
New Statesman
Now, two decades later, I realise it was a natural process. … We can learn from history that there were negative effects when automation killed millions of manufacturing jobs; 100 years ago, 30 per cent of the American population worked in and more »

 Putin and American political process – Google News

Do police officers shootings increase trump election chances? – Google News: James Comey Blames Donald Trump for Distracting From Police Violence and Uses Howard Talk to Announce Book … – Newsweek
 


Newsweek
James Comey Blames Donald Trump for Distracting From Police Violence and Uses Howard Talk to Announce Book …
Newsweek
On Wednesday, Comey told the group that the United States seems less focused on the issues of law enforcement and race than it had been in previous years following the fatal officer-involved shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014. He  

 Do police officers shootings increase trump election chances? – Google News

Twitter nears first profitable quarter as it slashes expenses, shares jump – Reuters.com
 


CNET
Twitter nears first profitable quarter as it slashes expenses, shares jump
Reuters.com
… the company in the United States, where lawmakers are investigating how Russia used social media to interfere in the2016 U.S. election. Twitter has pledged to make political advertising more transparent on its service. Russia has denied any
Twitter Shows Signs of Life With Renewed Sales and User GrowthBloombergall 24 news articles »

Trump, Putin, and the Mob – Google News: Trolling President Donald Trump in Washington DC – Stuff.co.nz
 


Stuff.co.nz
Trolling President Donald Trump in Washington DC
Stuff.co.nz
An inflatable chicken with Trump-like hair is pictured outside the White House. Activist Taran Singh Brar said it was a visual statement showing that Trump is to afraid to release his tax returns, stand up to Putin and is playing a ‘game of Chicken and more »

 Trump, Putin, and the Mob – Google News

Putin and the Mob – Google News: Trolling President Donald Trump in Washington DC – Stuff.co.nz
 


Stuff.co.nz
Trolling President Donald Trump in Washington DC
Stuff.co.nz
Two days before the inauguration, a dancing flash mob of up to 200 convened near Vice President Mike Pence’s temporarily rented home in Washington, filling the streets with Beyoncé’s music, biodegradable glitter and rainbow banners. “It’s a way for the …and more »

 Putin and the Mob – Google News

Russian Intelligence services and organized crime – Google News: Trump: ‘Sad Commentary’ that Clinton Campaign Paid for Research on His Past – Voice of America
 


Voice of America
Trump: ‘Sad Commentary’ that Clinton Campaign Paid for Research on His Past
Voice of America
U.S. news media, led by The Washington Post, reported that a Washington lawyer, Marc Elias, who represented Clinton’s campaign and the national political organization, hired Fusion GPS, a Washington firm, to conduct the research at a time that Clinton and more »

 Russian Intelligence services and organized crime – Google News

morell on trump – Google News: Here’s How Clinton Campaign Cash Could Have Ended Up In The Hands Of Russian Operatives – The Daily Caller
 


Washington Post
Here’s How Clinton Campaign Cash Could Have Ended Up In The Hands Of Russian Operatives
The Daily Caller
Morell, a Hillary Clinton supporter, expressed concerns about that information exchange during an interview in March. During an interview in March, Morrel said that it was impossible to judge the information in the dossier without understanding who the …
If Journalists Were Consistent They’d Claim Hillary ‘Colluded With Russians’ On The DossierMediaiteall 391 news articles »

 morell on trump – Google News

trump and russia – Google News: Corker vows to get answers on Trump’s Russia sanctions delay – Politico
 


Politico
Corker vows to get answers on Trump’s Russia sanctions delay
Politico
The chief GOP architect of a Russia sanctions package that Congress overwhelmingly approved earlier this year vowed Wednesday to find out why the Trump administration has delayed using its new powers to punish Moscow. Senate Foreign Relations …and more »

 trump and russia – Google News

Russian Intelligence services – Google News: Time for the Feds to Say What They Know About Kaspersky – WIRED
 


New York Daily News
Time for the Feds to Say What They Know About Kaspersky
WIRED
But while American federal agencies remove all traces of one of the world’s most popular pieces of security software from their networks, they have yet to explain exactly what merits that Government Services Administration ban. And as the rest of the 
How’s the removal of Russian software from federal computers going?Sacramento Bee
Kaspersky Lab plans audit to show its source code is free of Russian spyingThe Boston Globe
Spying for Russia? It would simply kill our business, says Eugene KasperskyComputer Business Review
CSO Online –TechCrunch –New York Daily News –Wall Street Journal
all 205 news articles »

 Russian Intelligence services – Google News

trump criminal investigation – Google News: How Steve Bannon and Sean Hannity ginned up the Hillary Clinton uranium story – Salon
 


CNN
How Steve Bannon and Sean Hannity ginned up the Hillary Clinton uranium story
Salon
President Donald Trump has spent much of his presidency engulfed by congressional and criminal investigations into Russian efforts to help him win the 2016 presidential election. But today, Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., the chairman of the House 
Obama-era uranium deal yields new questions, new accusations and new investigationCNN
What you need to know about Hillary Clinton, Russia, and uraniumPolitiFact
US House Republicans Open New Clinton ProbesVoice of America
Washington Examiner –The Hill –Ars Technica –The Hill
all 275 news articles »

 trump criminal investigation – Google News

Donald Trump: Bob Corker Wasnt Always Anti-Trump

After praising Trump repeatedly during the 2016 campaign, Sen. Bob Corker is now singing a different tune.

 Donald Trump

Paul Ryan accuses Trump administration of ‘stonewalling’ requests on Russia dossier – The Independent
 


The Independent
Paul Ryan accuses Trump administration of ‘stonewalling’ requests on Russia dossier
The Independent
However, the FBI has been investigating it as part of the probe into possible coordination last year between Russia and the Trump campaign, with special counsel Robert Mueller’s team having spoken in recent weeks with Mr Steele. The dossier contends and more »

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9:26 AM 10/26/2017 – America Asleep at the Keyboard as Cyber Warfare Gets Real

Saved Stories – Trump Investigations

Saved Stories – Trump Investigations
Trump Investigations Report: 6:51 AM 10/26/2017 Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. The Washington Post
Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Getting Encryption onto the Front Burner
Trump’s and Putin’s connections with organized crime – Google News: Fights in Russia: Putin’s Acolytes Are Determined to Crush Navalny’s Opposition, One Activist at a Time – Newsweek
trump russian candidate – Google News: Orange County is turning blue. Can Dana Rohrabacher survive his chumminess with Trump? – Los Angeles Times
Trump Investigations Report: 7:04 AM 10/26/2017 Who is Bill Browder? by Seth Hettena
Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Rational Security: The How Many Elephants Make a Stampede? Edition
Putin and American political process – Google News: “Fake news is about selling you doubt”: Garry Kasparov on cyber security, automation and Putin – New Statesman
Do police officers shootings increase trump election chances? – Google News: James Comey Blames Donald Trump for Distracting From Police Violence and Uses Howard Talk to Announce Book … – Newsweek
Twitter nears first profitable quarter as it slashes expenses, shares jump – Reuters.com
Trump, Putin, and the Mob – Google News: Trolling President Donald Trump in Washington DC – Stuff.co.nz
Putin and the Mob – Google News: Trolling President Donald Trump in Washington DC – Stuff.co.nz
Russian Intelligence services and organized crime – Google News: Trump: ‘Sad Commentary’ that Clinton Campaign Paid for Research on His Past – Voice of America
morell on trump – Google News: Here’s How Clinton Campaign Cash Could Have Ended Up In The Hands Of Russian Operatives – The Daily Caller
trump and russia – Google News: Corker vows to get answers on Trump’s Russia sanctions delay – Politico
Russian Intelligence services – Google News: Time for the Feds to Say What They Know About Kaspersky – WIRED
trump criminal investigation – Google News: How Steve Bannon and Sean Hannity ginned up the Hillary Clinton uranium story – Salon
Donald Trump: Bob Corker Wasnt Always Anti-Trump
Paul Ryan accuses Trump administration of ‘stonewalling’ requests on Russia dossier – The Independent
Trump, Supporters Go On Offense After Report Of Clinton Tie To Dossier – NPR
Did Trump Family, Associates Break Law With Russia? A Guide to Potential Suspects in Mueller’s Probe – Newsweek
trump and intelligence community – Google News: Trump to release JFK files Thursday – CNN
Do mass shootings increase trump election chances? – Google News: The Dangerous Trend Threatening the Future of the Nation-State – Foreign Policy In Focus
trump, russia and the mob – Google News: ‘Putin’s Revenge’ dissects Russian leader’s motives – KSAT San Antonio
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8:40 AM 10/26/2017 – The WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was approached by chief executive Alexander Nix of the data firm Cambridge Analytica | A U.S. District Court judge has given the opposition research firm Fusion GPS until today to answer a subpoena

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Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried.

Washington PostOct 24, 2017
Russia’s cyber-meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election has been accompanied by what U.S. and European experts describe as a …

TRUMP-RUSSIA – The Early Edition: October 26, 2017

The WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was approached by chief executive Alexander Nix of the data firm Cambridge Analytica, which carried out work for the Trump campaign during the 2016 election, Assange said yesterday, saying that he could confirm that he rejected the request from Cambridge Analytica for help. Nicholas Confessore reports at the New York Times.

Nix asked Assange about Hillary Clintons 33,000 missing emails and help to release them, according to sources familiar with the congressional investigations into alleged Trump-Russia connections, Betsy Woodruff reports at The Daily Beast.

The Democratic National Committee (D.N.C.) were unaware that the national party helped to fund the salacious dossier compiled by former British Intelligence officer Christopher Steele which alleged connections between the Trump campaign and Russia, current and past leaders of the D.N.C. have said, following revelations this week that the Clinton campaign and the D.N.C. partly funded the research. Jonathan Easley reports at the Hill.

A U.S. District Court judge has given the opposition research firm Fusion GPS until today to answer a subpoena issued by the House Intelligence Committee earlier this month. Fusion GPS hired Steele to compile the dossier and Republicans in the committee have been seeking information about the firms bank records, Mark Hosenball reports at Reuters.

Documents from Hillary Clintons 2016 presidential campaign are expected to be received by the Senate Intelligence committee next week, according to two sources familiar with the matter. The documents could provide greater detail about the Democrats response to Russias interference campaign and the Democrats role in funding for the Steele dossier, Ali Watkins reports at POLITICO.

The Senate Judiciary Committee has fractured into competing agendas, with Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) focusing on the Obama-era uranium deal with Russia and Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) drafting legislation on foreign influence in U.S. elections. Elana Schor and Kyle Cheney report at POLITICO.

It was legal to publish apparently hacked emails from the D.N.C., lawyers from Trumps presidential campaign argued in a court filing yesterday, saying that WikiLeaks qualifies as an online service immune from legal liability. Josh Gerstein reports at POLITICO.

The key points explaining the background of the dossier and the implications of the latest revelations about funding are set out by Kenneth P. Vogel at the New York Times.

There should be a full investigation following the revelation that the Democrats partly funded the salacious dossier alleging links between the Trump campaign and Russia, congressional investigators should focus on the role of the D.N.C., the Clinton campaign, and the possible role played by the F.B.I., and it would be wise for Mueller to resign from his role. The Wall Street Journal editorial board writes.

The F.B.I. has been so thoroughly implicated in the Russia meddling story and calls for special counsel Robert Mueller to recuse himself from the Russia investigation are not just fanciful partisan grandstanding, Holman W. Jenkins Jr. writes at the Wall Street Journal setting out the connections between the dossier, the Obama administration, the F.B.I. investigation into the Trump campaign, Mueller, the Obama-era deal to expand U.S.-Russia nuclear business, the Clinton Foundation, and the F.B.I.s role in the nuclear business deal.

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The Early Edition: October 26, 2017
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Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks
The Early Edition: October 26, 2017
 

mikenova shared this story from Just Security.

Before the start of business, Just Security provides a curated summary of up-to-the-minute developments at home and abroad. Heres todays news.

TRUMP-RUSSIA

The WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was approached by chief executive Alexander Nix of the data firm Cambridge Analytica, which carried out work for the Trump campaign during the 2016 election, Assange said yesterday, saying that he could confirm that he rejected the request from Cambridge Analytica for help. Nicholas Confessore reports at the New York Times.

Nix asked Assange about Hillary Clintons 33,000 missing emails and help to release them, according to sources familiar with the congressional investigations into alleged Trump-Russia connections, Betsy Woodruff reports at The Daily Beast.

The Democratic National Committee (D.N.C.) were unaware that the national party helped to fund the salacious dossier compiled by former British Intelligence officer Christopher Steele which alleged connections between the Trump campaign and Russia, current and past leaders of the D.N.C. have said, following revelations this week that the Clinton campaign and the D.N.C. partly funded the research. Jonathan Easley reports at the Hill.

A U.S. District Court judge has given the opposition research firm Fusion GPS until today to answer a subpoena issued by the House Intelligence Committee earlier this month. Fusion GPS hired Steele to compile the dossier and Republicans in the committee have been seeking information about the firms bank records, Mark Hosenball reports at Reuters.

Documents from Hillary Clintons 2016 presidential campaign are expected to be received by the Senate Intelligence committee next week, according to two sources familiar with the matter. The documents could provide greater detail about the Democrats response to Russias interference campaign and the Democrats role in funding for the Steele dossier, Ali Watkins reports at POLITICO.

The Senate Judiciary Committee has fractured into competing agendas, with Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) focusing on the Obama-era uranium deal with Russia and Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) drafting legislation on foreign influence in U.S. elections. Elana Schor and Kyle Cheney report at POLITICO.

It was legal to publish apparently hacked emails from the D.N.C., lawyers from Trumps presidential campaign argued in a court filing yesterday, saying that WikiLeaks qualifies as an online service immune from legal liability. Josh Gerstein reports at POLITICO.

The key points explaining the background of the dossier and the implications of the latest revelations about funding are set out by Kenneth P. Vogel at the New York Times.

There should be a full investigation following the revelation that the Democrats partly funded the salacious dossier alleging links between the Trump campaign and Russia, congressional investigators should focus on the role of the D.N.C., the Clinton campaign, and the possible role played by the F.B.I., and it would be wise for Mueller to resign from his role. The Wall Street Journal editorial board writes.

The F.B.I. has been so thoroughly implicated in the Russia meddling story and calls for special counsel Robert Mueller to recuse himself from the Russia investigation are not just fanciful partisan grandstanding, Holman W. Jenkins Jr. writes at the Wall Street Journal setting out the connections between the dossier, the Obama administration, the F.B.I. investigation into the Trump campaign, Mueller, the Obama-era deal to expand U.S.-Russia nuclear business, the Clinton Foundation, and the F.B.I.s role in the nuclear business deal.

NORTH KOREA

The U.S. should take literally North Koreas threat to test a nuclear weapon above ground, a senior North Korean official warned in an interview yesterday, adding that Pyongyang has always brought its words into action. Will Ripley reports at CNN.

China is helping us and maybe Russias going through the other way and hurting what were getting, President Trump said in an interview with Fox Business Network yesterday, stating that Russia has undermined efforts to rein in North Korea and that the threat posed by the regime could be more easily resolved if the U.S. had a better relationship with Russia. Reuters reports.

I solve problems, Trump also said in the interview, lamenting the fact that the North Korea problem had not been resolved earlier, but saying that he would deal with the crisis. Olivia Beavers reports at the Hill.

Well, Id rather not say, but youll be surprised, Trump said yesterday in response to a question whether he would visit the Demilitarized Zone (D.M.Z.) between North and South Korea during his 12-day tour of Asia at the beginning of next month. Jordan Fabian reports at the Hill.

The leader of South Koreas conservative opposition party has called on the Trump administration to reintroduce tactical nuclear weapons to South Korea in the face of the threat posed by Pyongyang, the possibility of this option was also raised by South Koreas Defense Minister Song Young-moo during a meeting with Defense Secretary Jim Mattis last month. Felicia Schwartz reports at the Wall Street Journal.

North Koreas extensive re-education camps have been revealed by satellite images and a report by the U.S.-based Committee for Human Rights in North Korea due to be released today. Anna Fifield reports at the Washington Post.

IRAQ

The U.S. and Iran should not bring their trouble inside Iraq, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi urged yesterday, saying that he would like to work with both countries, that U.S. forces should remain in Iraq after recapturing the last of the territory in the hands of the Islamic State group, and that Iranian-backed militias would be disbanded if they did not come under the control of the Baghdad government. Yaroslav Trofimov reports at the Wall Street Journal.

We wont accept anything but its cancellation and the respect of the Constitution, Abadi said in a statement today, saying that the Kurdistan regions offer to freeze the result of the controversial Iraqi Kurdistan independence referendum held last month was not enough to open negotiations. Reutersreports.

Iraqi federal forces and Iranian-backed Iraqi militia attacked Peshmerga positions in Nineveh province, the Kurdistan Region Security Council (K.R.S.C.) said today, also calling on the Baghdad government to accept the offers for unconditional talks and adding that the U.S. should stop Iraqs reckless behavior. Reuters reporting.

The clashes between Iraqi federal forces and Kurdish Peshmerga have impeded the movement of coalition military equipment inside Iraq and Syria, thereby undermining the campaign against the Islamic State group, the spokesperson for the U.S.-led coalition Col. Ryan Dillon said today. The APreports.

The U.S. has sought to defuse tension between the Iraqi government and the Iraqi Kurds, the two U.S. allies have been involved in clashes since last months Iraqi Kurdistan independence referendum, the Iraqi Kurds yesterday offered to suspend the results of the referendum which returned an overwhelming vote in favor of independence, however this has fallen short of Baghdads demand that the result be annulled. Isabel Coles, Ali A. Nabhan and Yaroslav Trofimov report at the Wall Street Journal.

Abadi is set to meet with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani today in Tehran for talks on regional security, Ted Regencia reports at Al Jazeera.

Abadis approach to the Kurdistan independence referendum has won praise from even his traditional critics, and his increased popularity as a consequence of his decisive actions have seemingly cemented his reelection next year, however difficulties remain. Tamer El-Ghobashy and Mustafa Salim observe at the Washington Post.

Abadi has managed to keep Iraq unified despite the predictions of an inevitable breakup, taking a tough stance against the Iraqi Kurdistan has seemingly paid off and Abadi is in a stronger position to lead the country out of the shadow of war and work with regional powers. Ishaan Tharoor provides an analysis at the Washington Post.

NIGER

My generals and my military had authorization over the U.S. mission in Niger, Trump said yesterday when asked whether he authorized the mission, making the comments after the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph Dunford said earlier this week that the U.S. special forces members were on a reconnaissance mission. Rebecca Kheel reports at the Hill.

The confused information amid the Niger ambush on Oct. 4 led the White House to believe that several U.S. soldiers might have been missing, the White House did not receive information that three bodies had been recovered and one soldier remained missing until at least eight hours after the attack began, according to an official familiar with the matter. Greg Jaffe and Karen DeYoung report at the Washington Post.

The Trump administration has been putting in motion plans to allow lethal drone strikes in Niger, according to U.S. officials, and the plan had been under consideration long before the deadly Oct. 4 attack. Ken Dilanian, Courtney Kube, William M. Arkin and Hans Nichols report at NBC News.

IRAN

Israel would act militarily by itself if international efforts led by Trump do not help stop Iran attaining nuclear capabilities, Israels Intelligence Minister Israel Katz said today. Tim Kelly and Nobuhiro Kubo reporting at Reuters.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has embarked on efforts to increase financial pressure on Iran and target the financing of terror in the Middle East, launching a new anti-terror finance center in Saudi Arabia yesterday. The efforts come following Trumps refusal to certify Irans compliance with the 2015 nuclear agreement last month, Ian Talley and Margherita Stancati report at the Wall Street Journal.   

The House of Representatives voted for new sanctions against the Iran-backed Lebanese Shiite Hezbollah militia group yesterday, today the House will vote on another bill calling for additional sanctions aimed at Irans ballistic missiles program. Al Jazeera reports.

A bipartisan plan for a tougher approach on Iran is being crafted by Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) along with his Democratic counterpart Ben Cardin (Md.), Corker said yesterday. Elana Schor reporting at POLITICO.

SYRIA

Pro-Syrian government forces have seized an oil pumping station in the eastern Deir al-Zour province, a Hezbollah-run news service reported today, the report saying that the position constitutes a launch pad for an offensive on what is believed to be the last remaining Islamic State stronghold in Syria. Reuters reports.

The outcome is not in doubt, the U.S. commander of the international campaign against the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq, Lt. Gen. Paul E. Funk II, said yesterday, saying that the militants were on the run and they cannot hold territory, but noting that the coalition would continue to pursue foreign Islamic State fighters before they can return to their home countries and there is a real problem that the virtual caliphate continues to recruit. David Zucchino reports at the New York Times.

The U.N. envoy for Syria Staffan de Mistura will meet with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in Geneva today, the AP reports.

U.S.-led airstrikes continue. U.S. and coalition forces carried out seven airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Syria on October 24. Separately, partner forces conducted three strikes against targets in Iraq. [Central Command]

RUSSIA

Top Senate Republicans have vowed to press the White House on delays to imposing new sanctions on Russia and whether this has been done intentionally, the legislation for the sanctions was passed three and a half weeks ago and were in response to Russias interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Kevin Liptak, Ted Barrett and Sara Murray report at CNN.

Democratic members of House Foreign Affairs Committee have also demanded answers from the Trump administration on delays to sanctions against Russia in a letter to the president yesterday. Andrew Desiderio reports at The Daily Beast.

Germanys President Frank-Walter Steinmeier met with Russian President Vladimir Putin yesterday to discuss key issues, such as Ukraine, Syria, economic ties, the Iran nuclear deal and the crisis on the Korean Peninsula. The AP reports.

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION FOREIGN POLICY

Trumps son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner is expected to take a low-profile role during Trumps visit to China next month, with some speculating that Kushners diminished position has been a consequence of chief of staff John Kellys efforts to standardize practice at the White House. Annie Karni and Andrew Restuccia report at POLITICO.

The relationship between the most senior U.S. officials at N.A.T.O. headquarters is described by David M. Herszenhorn at POLITICO Magazine.

The challenges facing the Trump administration did not start with Trump and the White House must grapple with the most challenging foreign-policy environment in modern history due to threat, organizational and cognitive complexities. Amy Zegart writes at The Atlantic.

Secretary of State Rex Tillersons visit to Pakistan this week shone a spotlight on the difficulty U.S.-Pakistan relationship, it is difficult to understand the U.S. position due to its inconsistent messages and Tillerson should not have lectured Pakistan without recognizing Pakistans legitimate security interests.  The DAWN.com editorial board writes.

Tillerson achieved a rare diplomatic victory by bringing Saudi Arabia and Iraq closer together last weekend, marking a potentially significant development between the two countries who have been traditional adversaries. Rhys Dubin writes at Foreign Policy.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

The House of Representatives held a series of hearings focused on the Trump administrations knowledge of Kaspersky Lab anti-virus software and Russias ability to access U.S. National Security Agency (N.S.A.) classified information through Kaspersky Lab products. Morgan Chalfant reports at the Hill.

The U.S. and Gulf Arab allies sanctioned eleven Yemeni individuals and entities suspected of financing the Islamic State group and al-Qaeda, the U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin praising the designation by Gulf Arab allies, the measure demonstrating a rare moment of coordination, especially amid the Gulf crisis which began on June 5. Aya Batrawy and Abdullah Al-Shihri report at the AP.

A former F.B.I. informant has been cleared to testify before Congress over the Obama-era nuclear business deal with Russia, a Justice Department spokesperson confirming that the informant would not be subject to a confidentiality agreement. John Solomon reports at the Hill.

The Senate Armed Services Committee has expressed confidence that it will finish work on the annual defense policy bill soon, the chairman of the committee John McCain (R-Ariz.) saying that it can be done in the next few days. Rebecca Kheel reports at the Hill.

I havent seen any hard evidence on the delivery of weapons from the Russians to the Taliban, the chairman of N.A.T.O.s military committee Gen. Petr Pavel told reporters yesterday, making the comments amid concern from Pentagon officials that Russia has been increasingly involved in the conflict in Afghanistan. Rebecca Kheel reports at the Hill.

The position of military generals at the top of the Trump administration carries risks and perhaps they are in over their heads. Mark Perry writes at POLITICO Magazine.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is expected to propose strategic dialogue between the leaders of the U.S., India and Australia to counter Chinas expansionism. Reuters reports.

Read on Just Security »

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Cyberspace, cyber control, cyber wars – Google Search
 

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Services Ponder How to Train Like They Fight for Cyber

Signal MagazineOct 24, 2017
In 2011, cyberspace was declared an operational domain by the secretary … the command and control(C2) framework to defend against cyber was … In cyber warfare, one of the challenges is the changing terrain, Kraft said.

Story image for Cyberspace, cyber control, cyber wars from Washington Free Beacon

DHS, FBI Warn Companies of Ongoing Cyber Attacks on Critical …

Washington Free BeaconOct 24, 2017
Worst-case scenarios in a future cyber war include destruction of critical … “The pace of international conflict and cyberspace threats has … Other methods involve targeting of industrial control system (ICS) infrastructure.

Story image for Cyberspace, cyber control, cyber wars from The Hill

Frustrated senators demand cyber war strategy from Trump

The HillOct 19, 2017
Lawmakers are growing impatient with the Trump administration on the issue of cyber war, saying the United States lacks a clear policy for …

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Cyberwarfare: The Most Stealthy Weapon Is Information

Now. Powered by Northrop Grumman. (blog)16 hours ago
The Stuxnet worm, which targets industrial control systems, … National Security Agency (NSA) analysts have supported war fighters in Iraq … How do you know what kind of cyber tools and techniques one side might have developed? … In cyberspace, we also lose traditional boundaries, such as borders …
Russia’s push to control cyberspace – Google Search
 

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Story image for Russia's push to control cyberspace from Washington Post

Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried.

Washington PostOct 24, 2017
Russia’s cyber-meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election has been accompanied by what U.S. and European experts describe as a …

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[David Ignatius] Russia’s worrisome push to control cyberspace

The Korea Herald2 hours ago
Russia’s cybermeddling in the 2016 US presidential election has been accompanied by what US and European experts describe as a …

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Russia’s worrisome push to control cyberspace

The Daily StarOct 21, 2017
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on October 26, 2017, on page 7. Recommended. Advertisement …
Who is Bill Browder? (Updated)
 

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g7czdc3zBill Browder

This much is clear: Vladimir Putin hates Bill Browder.

Browder was once the largest foreign investor in Russia and, it needs to be said, a great admirer of the Russian president. Today, he is perhaps the Putin’s regime’s fiercest critic, and Browder must derive some satisfaction in the way he grates on the Kremlin.

Browder’s change of heart came well after he was kicked out of the country in 2005. It was the death of an accountant who worked for Browder named Sergei Magnitsky that did it. Magnitsky was thrown in prison, where he was beaten and left to die in 2009 from lack of medical treatment. His crime? Magnitsky had had the temerity to expose  a massive $230 million tax fraud perpetrated by Russian officials.

In response, Browder lobbied Congress to draft legislation imposing sanctions on the Russian officials responsible for Magnitsky’s death. The Magnitsky Act was signed into law by President Obama in 2012.  Browder has continued his campaign in Canada, the United States, and Europe —  and it has driven Russian officials bat-shit insane.

Russian legislators responded to the Magnitsky Act by banning adoption of Russian children by Americans — harming their most vulnerable citizens for what, political retaliation? A year later, in a shameful display of injustice, a Moscow court convicted Magnitsky of tax evasion in a posthumous trial. (Browder was found guilty of fraud in absentia.) The Trump campaign was drawn into a June 2016 meeting with Russians on the Magnitsky Act when the future president’s son was promised dirt on Hillary Clinton.

In the latest hysterical response, now it’s Browder who is suspected of murdering Magnitsky. According to Russian prosecutors, Browder colluded with a British intelligence agent to convince Russian prison doctors to withhold care for Magnitsky. The evidence is comical: poorly written communications that were allegedly intercepted from Western spy agencies.

Russia managed to get Browder briefly banned from entry to the United States by putting him on an Interpol wanted list. His visa privileges were restored by the Trump administration on Monday after members of Congress and the press leaped to Browder’s defense.

The reason the Magnitsky Act drives the Kremlin nuts is that it hits the kleptocrats in their unprotected flank. Russian oligarchs and the kleptocrats who steal from the state store their assets in the West. And what is the point of stealing a fortune from the Russian people if you can’t buy condos in Miami or Manhattan or send your kids to exclusive British schools because of some lousy sanctions?

Browder has rightly been praised for his courage in standing up to the Putin regime. And his book, Red Notice, is an excellent read.  However, the laudatory coverage Browder regularly receives from a press corps he has skillfully cultivated and his star treatment before a US Congress he lobbies require a selective reading of events.

The fact is that Browder was once one of Putin’s biggest cheerleaders, as he admitted during deposition:

Q: So in 2005, you were quite a supporter of Vladimir Putin’s, right?

A: Correct.

Most gallingly, he defended the 2003 arrest of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, the head of Yukos, one of the world’s biggest oil producers. Stalin would have approved of the way Khodorkovsky was convicted, imprisoned in a gulag at Russia’s border with China, and then put on trial and convicted again. His  company was seized and acquired by the state.

It wasn’t exactly clear what Khodorovsky had done wrong except he had criticized Russia’s corruption during a televised meeting with President Putin a few months before his arrest and funded a movement promoting the rule of law and democratic values called Open Russia.

Khodorkovsky’s arrest and the seizure of Yukos wasn’t democracy; it was Mafia tactics. But Browder hailed Khodorkovsky’s arrest as progress toward Russia’s return to greatness:

Putin, was only doing “what any leader would do to further his nation’s interests,”  Browder wrote. “While there may be some things about Putin that we disagree with, we should give him the benefit of the doubt in this area and fully support him in his task of taking back control of the country from the oligarchs.”

As for Khodorkovsky, Browder said he was hiding something. “Khodorkovsky collected an enormous pile of cheap assets from the government and minority shareholders, and then embarked on an impressive charm and lobbying offensive to legitimize himself and his wealth. He has been very successful in getting people to forget his not-so-distant past,” Browder wrote.

Now, it’s Browder who has been very successful in getting people to forget his not-so-distant past. Putin’s No. 1 enemy, as he describes himself, was once Putin’s No. 1 fan.(To his credit, he did expose corruption at the companies in which he invested such as the gas giant Gazprom, and this made powerful enemies.)

Here is part of a presentation by Browder in April 2005 titled Seven Big Myths About Russia

Screen Shot 2017-10-25 at 11.06.33 AMHere’s how The Wall Street Journal described Browder in 2006 after he had been kicked out of Russia:

Browder has been one of the most outspoken supporters among foreign investors of Russian President Vladimir Putin. He argued tirelessly that the western media and critics of the Kremlin were misreading the situation and that Putin’s administration was good for investors. He was defending the Kremlin as recently as January, when Browder spoke at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

That’s right. Browder was still defending Putin even after he was denied entry to the country.

Why such love for Putin? In deposition, Browder says the two men never met. The answer: It was just business. Investing in Russia was very profitable. His fund, Hermitage Capital Management, recorded $1 billion in profits and Browder pocketed $130 million in 2006.

When Browder was denied entry to Russia, ostensibly as a threat to national security, his Hermitage Capital Management was the country’s largest foreign investor with $4 billion in Russian equities. Like Khodorkovsky before him, Browder appeared to have made the mistake of believing that he was untouchable. Who in their right mind would ban the man who brought billions into the Russian economy?

Browder’s lobbying of US politicians and courts would sit better with me had he not given up his U.S. citizenship. In 1998, Browder obtained a passport from the more Russophilic United Kingdom. Published reports say he did this for tax reasons but gave a different explanation during deposition:

Q. So why did you give up your U.S. citizenship?

A. Personal reasons.

Q. And what are those personal reasons?

A. My family was persecuted during the McCarthy era….

Q. What kind of persecution did you face?

A. My grandmother was sick with cancer and the U.S. Government tried to deport her to Russia when she was dying. [Browder’s grandfather, Earl Browder, led the Communist Party in the United States.]

Q. What year was that?

A. In 1950 something.

Q. I see. And so 1998, this all came back as a rush of emotion and you decided to give up your U.S. citizenship?

A. No.

Interestingly, Britain, Browder’s new home, has been much slower to take up the Magnitsky cause. (A bill passed the House of Commons this year and is now being considered in the House of Lords.)  The Brits have a conflicted relationship with Russian rubles: They have to come to depend on them.  London is where Kremlin insiders like to stash their money. It’s where they buy homes through shell companies, go shopping and send their children to posh schools.  Billions of pounds have washed through Britain since the fall of the Soviet Union, although nobody knows exactly how much. A group even offers kleptocracy tours of London.

Browder has been demanding justice for Sergei Magnitsky — and rightfully so — but, at least in one instance, he literally ran away from an American court.  Here is what happened when a process server tried to serve Browder with a subpoena in New York following his 2015 appearance on The Daily Show:

The case involved a Russian financier named Denis Katsyv. At the time, Katsyv was accused in federal court of laundering money that was part of the fraud that Sergei Magnitsky uncovered. The case that was based on information Browder provided  to prosecutors in New York.¹   Browder eventually did have to testify and I’ve posted Browder’s Deposition.

Am I wrong in thinking that it’s grossly unfair and somewhat suspicious for Browder to demand justice for Magnitsky while fleeing a subpoena in the case he instigated?  Shouldn’t he be proud to stand up for his late friend and colleague?

Please don’t mistake what I’m saying here. I’m no fan of Putin, but Browder is undermining his own cause when he selectively uses the law and the press to serve only his own interests.

1. Katsyv’s case, U.S. v Prevezon Holdings, was settled for $5.9 million before trial.

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Russian President Vladimir Putin. (Sergei Chirikov/Reuters)

 Opinion writer

October 24 at 7:35 PM 

Russia’s cyber-meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election has been accompanied by what U.S. and European experts describe as a worrisome Kremlin campaign to rewrite the rules for global cyberspace.

A draft of a Russian proposal for a new “United Nations Convention on Cooperation in Combating Information Crimes” was recently shown to me by a security expert who obtained a copy. The 54-page document includes 72 proposed articles, covering collection of Internet traffic by authorities, “codes of conduct” for cyberspace and “joint investigation” of malicious activity. The language sounds bureaucratic and harmless, but experts say that if adopted, it would allow Russia to squeeze cyberspace even more.

The Kremlin’s proposed convention would enhance the ability of Russia and other authoritarian nations to control communication within their countries, and to gain access to communications in other countries, according to several leading U.S. cyber experts. They described the latest draft as part of Moscow’s push over the past decade to shape the legal architecture of what Russian strategists like to call the “information space.”

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The proposal was floated by the Kremlin early this year, and outlined in an April 4 article in Kommersant. The Moscow daily reported that the Russian Foreign Ministry had described the convention as an “innovative” and “universal” attempt to replace the 2001 Budapest Convention, which has been signed by the United States and 55 other countries but rejected by Russia. Kommersant said “Russian authorities saw a threat to the sovereignty of the country” in the Budapest pact.

Russia’s bid to rewrite global rules through the United Nations was matched by a personal pitch on cyber-cooperation in July from President Vladimir Putin to President Trump at the Group of 20 summit in Hamburg. Putin “vehemently denied” to Trump that Russia had interfered in the U.S. election, Trump said in a tweet. Trump then floated a mystifying proposal: “Putin & I discussed forming an impenetrable Cyber Security unit so that election hacking, & many other negative things, will be guarded and safe.”

Trump’s suggestion that America join Russia in cyberdefense provoked an uproar in the United States. One Twitter commentator wrote: “This is like the FBI asking the Mafia to form an anti-crime unit together.”

The White House quickly backtracked after Trump’s tweet. Homeland security adviser Tom Bossert told reporters on July 14: “I don’t believe that the U.S. and Russia have come to that point yet in cyberspace. And until we do, we wouldn’t have the conversation about partnership.”

Many U.S. cyber experts share Bossert’s view that although any formal treaty or partnership with Moscow now is unwise, quiet confidence-building discussions might be useful. Those could include military-to-military or technical contacts to explore how to avoid catastrophic cyber-events that might cripple strategic systems or pose systemic risk.

U.S. and Russian officials had maintained such a dialogue to explore norms for the Internet, but so far it has been a dead end. The Russians were led by Andrey Krutskikh, a foreign ministry official who is Putin’s cyber adviser; and on the U.S. side, by Christopher Painter, who was White House cyber chief under President Barack Obama and then cyber coordinator at the State Department, a post he left this year.

These contacts are sensible, but they have withered as U.S.-Russia relations have deteriorated. A high-level working group stopped meeting after Russia invaded Ukraine in 2014. A U.N.-sponsored Group of Governmental Experts on Information Security broke up in June after failing to reach consensus on measures for improving information security. Putin’s bilateral proposal at Hamburg quickly disappeared after Trump’s premature endorsement.

The Russians, meanwhile, continue their campaign to regulate cyberspace on their terms, by mobilizing allies to support their alternative to the Budapest convention; Moscow’s biggest complaint is that the Budapest framework, in Article 32 (b), allows the owners of data to control its use, rather than governments. Moscow wants state control of information.

Russia got some global support for its effort at a September gathering in Xiamen, China, of the so-called BRICS countries: Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. In their formal declaration, the countries “recognize the need for a universal regulatory binding instrument on combatting the criminal use of ICTs [information and communications technologies] under the UN auspices.” The countries “acknowledge the initiative” of Russia in seeking such a binding pact.

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Decoding Internet Security: Cyberweapons
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Here’s what you need to know about what cyberweapons are and when they have been used in the past. (Dani Player, Sarah Parnass/The Washington Post)
Here’s what you need to know about what cyberweapons are and when they have been used in the past. (Dani Player,Sarah Parnass/The Washington Post)

If the events of the past year have taught us anything, it’s that Russia views information as a decisive political weapon and wants to control this potential battle space. The global regulatory side of this contest gets little attention, but it could help determine whether open information flows survive in the age of the autocrats.

Twitter: @IgnatiusPost

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How Obama Used Hillarys Dossier to Spy on Trump
 

mikenova shared this story from Frontpage Mag.

Daniel Greenfield, a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the Freedom Center, is an investigative journalist and writer focusing on the radical left and Islamic terrorism.

How do you legally spy on your political opponents?

At some point in time that question was asked in the White House, at the DNC or in the hotel suites where Hillary and her staff were staying during her speaking tours. It wasn’t exactly asked that way.

But it was asked. And now we know more of the answer.

What Hillary and Obama did wasn’t Watergate. That was amateur hour. Its sophistication is a tribute to the left’s deep knowledge and control of the workings of Washington, D.C. The men and women who planned this and carried it out understood not only government, but had an intimate familiarity with the loopholes in the laws and the networks of contacts that could realize their highly illegal plans.

The eavesdropping on Trump officials carried the ‘fingerprints’ of an administration that bypassed Congress to fund left-wing groups by blackmailing banks into huge settlements paid out to political allies in a billion dollar slush fund and sent pallets of foreign currency to Iran on unmarked planes. A complete lack of ethical norms was combined with the careful use of legal loopholes to protect the actions of the perpetrators even while they were engaging in a criminal conspiracy.

The revolutionary cell is embedded into left-wing organizing. These cells combined into networks across government, the media and the non-profit sector to pursue a collective agenda. The latest revelations about the Trump dossier give us greater insight into how Obama and Hillary’s people conspired to legally eavesdrop on political opponents by breaking up that eavesdropping into a series of legal actions carried out across different cells.

The road that led to Susan Rice and Samantha Power ‘unmasking’ Trump officials began with the Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee funding a dossier pushing Trump-Russia conspiracies. The dossier was sourced through Fusion GPS which is notorious for handfeeding material to reporters.

The Clinton campaign was seeing to it that whatever Fusion GPS produced would make its way into media stories without having Hillary’s fingerprints on it. Indeed the only reason we learned that Hillary and the DNC were ultimately behind the dossier was a congressional subpoena that risked exposing other Fusion GPS clients.

But the second reason was far more devious and devastating.

Fusion GPS’ man for the job was Christopher Steele. The former British intelligence figure had connections with FBI people. Hillary Clinton wasn’t just doing “opposition research” as her former press secretary has claimed.  The best way to do opposition research in an American election doesn’t involve hiring a Brit in London with contacts in Russian intelligence and the FBI.

That is however the best way to independently produce information that can be injected into an intelligence investigation. (It’s also, perhaps not coincidentally, a great way for the Russians to inject their own material into a presidential election without getting their fingerprints on it.)

Hiring Fusion GPS and then Steele created two degrees of separation between the dossier and Hillary. A London ex-intel man is a strange choice for opposition research in an American election, but a great choice to create a plausible ‘source’ that appears completely disconnected from American politics.

What would an ex-M.I.6 agent have to do with Hillary, Obama or Trump?

The official story is that Steele was a dedicated whistleblower who decided to message an FBI pal for reasons “above party politics” while the Fusion GPS boss was so dedicated that he spent his ownmoney on it after the election. Some figures in the FBI decided to take Steele’s material, offering to pay him for his work and reimbursing some of his expenses. Portions of the dossier were used to justify the FISA eavesdropping on Trump officials and were then rolled into the Mueller investigation.

That is how cells coordinate by breaking up a larger plot into a series of individual actions that just happen to produce the ideal result. Hillary and the DNC hire Fusion GPS. Fusion GPS hires Steele. Steele contacts an FBI pal. The FBI takes up the dossier. And then it’s turned into a pretext for eavesdropping.

But there isn’t supposed to be a link between the Democrats and the eavesdropping.

That’s why Marc Elias, the Clinton campaign and DNC lawyer who hired Fusion GPS, had denied it in the past. It’s why Fusion GPS fought the investigation so desperately. Opposition research isn’t a crime. A conspiracy to eavesdrop on your political opponents however is very much a criminal matter.

A forensic examination of the dirty dossier’s journey shows us that this modern Watergate was a collaborative effort between an outgoing Democrat administration and its expected Dem successor. The effort was broken up into two big pieces. The Clinton side would generate the material. The Obama side would make use of it. Steele was positioned as the interface between the two sides of the effort.

The London detour created and laundered the dossier. Moving the operation offshore tangled the connection between the Clinton side and the Obama side. This was important because what Steele produced wasn’t really opposition research, but a pretext for a government investigation.

That pretext couldn’t come directly from Hillary. But the FBI was too politically divided to generate it.

Obama Inc. needed that pretext, but it also didn’t want to generate it internally. Any investigation of the political opposition was inherently explosive. It was better if the intelligence came from outside and especially overseas. That was why Fusion GPS brought in Steele.

The first FISA request was filed in June. It was shot down by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. That was the same month we were told that Fusion GPS hired Steele. The second FISA request came through in October. That was the month, Steele did his first media interview with Mother Jones.

Two birds were being killed with one stone.

Obama’s Watergate depended on extensive compartmentalization. The process that led to the eavesdropping on Trump officials and their unmasking at the hands of his officials had to appear as ‘clean’ as possible. Susan Rice and Samantha Power could make unmasking requests to the NSA, but they couldn’t be involved in generating the investigation that led to those requests.

Seeding the media with an astroturf campaign through Fusion GPS created the appearance of an organic push to investigate Trump-Russia ties. Targeting the lefty fringe of the media, Mother JonesThe Guardian, would bake in the narrative among a demographic already prone to conspiracy theories.

The operation was vastly more sophisticated than the crude ugliness of Watergate. But it was not unique in that regard. The fusion of government loopholes, political campaigns, media operations, opposition research and covert funding had occurred more than once during the Obama era.

The most recent example of such a fusion before Trump-Russia was the Iran Deal in which members of Congress were eavesdropped on, money was moved around through non-profits to influence the media, a White House operation planted stories in the media and billions were smuggled to Iran. This mixture of influence operation, propaganda, eavesdropping and laundering has likely happened far more often in the previous administration than we know.

The IRS targeting of conservatives, shutdown theater and the Libyan War offer more examples.

Obama’s eavesdropping on Trump didn’t break the norms. They had already been thoroughly broken. The network that is being uncovered, the interfaces between media insiders, top government officials and private interests, demonstrates why Obama Inc. believed that it could get away with it.

It had gotten away with all its old abuses. There was no reason to doubt it could do so again.

America still has elections. The rule of law exists. In theory. But the network being uncovered in the dossier investigation looks very much like something that would be found in a totalitarian state.

The combination of media propaganda, government surveillance and contrived investigations of political opponents is the sort of thing you would expect to find in… Russia. The key players were wary enough that they compartmentalized their conspiracy, breaking it up across the private and public sector, the media, private firms, law enforcement figures and even another country. But that just makes it look like a cross between terrorist cells and organized crime.

And that is what we are dealing with here.

The left’s networks are becoming increasingly malignant. They executed a sophisticated attack on the political process while contriving to blame it on their victims. What the attack reveals is just how much the levers of power in our political system are embedded in the shadowy networks that operate in and around government. And what those networks are willing to do to win.

The Trump-Russia dam has broken
 

mikenova shared this story from Palmer Report.

So there it is, finally, in plain sight for all to see. The collusion between the Donald Trump campaign and Russia is no longer merely centered around secret meetings with vague agendas, happenstance too remarkable to have been coincidence, and a thousand poorly understood connections. Now we have something entirely different, and it changes everything: a confession that the Trump campaign truly was trying to coordinate with Russia on the deep, dark, gritty kind of stuff that election rigging is made of.

The head of Cambridge Analytica, the voter data analysis firm that everyone from Jared Kushner on down has publicly credited for Donald Trump’s bizarre election victory, has been caught confessing that he tried to work with WikiLeaks to steal Hillary Clinton’s emails. Don’t let the imaginary half-degree of separation fool you here: Cambridge Analytica was the Donald Trump campaign. Trump is now claiming that the company only played a minor role in his campaign, so he can paint it as having acted on its own. Bullshit. This is everything.

It’s why Trump and his allies are now putting down their few remaining chips on the hilariously phony scandal about President Obama and Hillary Clinton and Russia and Uranium. It’s a joke of a fake story, but it’s the only desperate card they have left to play. It’s why most of the Republicans in Congress, even the ones like Chuck Grassley who had been willing to go along with the Trump-Russia investigation, are now suddenly trying to sabotage that investigation from within. The GOP didn’t want to have to get its hands dirty like this, but it’s now desperate to create the kind of distraction that might prop up Trump just long enough so it can get its tax bill rammed through.

What we’re seeing now is pure panic from anyone who still cares about Donald Trump, or still needs him a bit longer. Even if it’ll take a moment for the public to figure out that the Cambridge Analytica confession is the bombshell of the Trump-Russia scandal to date, Trump’s own side has immediately grasped that this is the bottomless pit from which there is no emerging.

We now have proof that the voter data analysis arm of the Donald Trump campaign was actively seeking to collude with Russian-controlled hacker thugs and criminals. It’s just a matter of time before we see proof that these efforts did lead to collusion, and that Trump and Russia did conspire to rig the election. The dam has broken. There’s no going back. It’s why we’re suddenly seeing borderline pandemonium. It’s about to get even more crazy.

 

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Why Clinton Camp’s Funding of the Trump Dossier Matters
 

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The news that Hillary Clinton’s campaign and the Democratic National Committee paid for former U.K. spy Christopher Steele’s investigation into Donald Trump showed one thing: Rarely have two political candidates been so worthy of each other in terms of cynicism as Clinton and Donald Trump. No wonder Russian President Vladimir Putin, another world-class cynic, dealt himself in.

QuickTake Vladimir Putin

Democrats were indignant when it turned out that Donald Trump Jr., the candidate’s son, was willing to accept damaging information about Clinton from a Russian source. No dirt was forthcoming in that case, though: Instead, a suburban Russian lawyer fighting for the interests of her client, sanctioned under the Magnitsky Act in the U.S., came to see Trump campaign officials to lobby against the law, not to share intelligence.

In the Clinton case, Fusion GPS, the firm working on the Trump opposition research, paid Steele, a foreigner, with the campaign’s money. The U.K., of course, is a U.S. ally; Russia is an adversary. But the information Steele produced came mainly from Russian sources. Unlike lawyer Natalya Veselnitskaya, who once did legal work for the FSB domestic intelligence in a minor property dispute, these sources were really well-connected, if Steele is to be believed. They included, according to the version of his dossier published by Buzzfeed, “a senior Russian Foreign ministry figure,” “a former top level Russian intelligence officer still active inside the Kremlin,” “a senior Russian financial official” and “a senior Kremlin official.”

In Moscow’s paranoid political climate, with the Kremlin seeing foreign agents everywhere and the FSB eager to earn its bread, what was the upside for these sources in sharing explosive secrets with a foreigner? The downside is clear: The standard prison sentence for espionage, handed down in recent spying cases, was 12 years — at the lower bound of the Russian criminal code’s range of 12 to 20. As a private operative, Steele couldn’t even offer his informants the thin protection that comes with working for a foreign intelligence agency, which might help a valuable agent if push came to shove.

But if the FSB and the Kremlin knew of Clinton’s interest in putting together a dossier on Trump, all these people had an excellent reason to talk, and especially to provide nonsensical information — such as that Dmitry Peskov, Putin’s press secretary, and not anyone in Russia’s intelligence community, was the keeper of a top-secret file on Trump. It was always obvious from the Steele reports that his sources were having fun spinning tall tales for him; since he wasn’t required to verify them and vouch for their accuracy — that’s the nature of raw intelligence — Steele faithfully wrote them down on Fusion GPS’s time.

Russia has never hid or denied its propaganda campaign during the U.S. election — except the elements of “active measures” it included: The rallies Kremlin trolls attempted to organize in the U.S. hinterland through Facebook ads, perhaps (but not definitely) the distribution of Democrats’ stolen emails to the media. These fit in nicely with the possible use of a Brit on Clinton’s payroll as a disinformation channel. Now that the nature of Russian activity on social networks has come to light, it’s likelier than ever that the goal of the whole exercise was to sow discord and instability in the U.S. Pushing Russian-generated kompromat on Trump to Clinton would have served that purpose brilliantly.

The Clinton campaign and the DNC reportedly started paying Fusion GPS in April, 2016, which was after the FBI warned about potential Russian hacking and several months before the DNC publicly confirmed that its network was breached by groups tied to Russian intelligence. It’s likely that, even before that announcement, the Democrats had been planning to use the Russian angle against Trump. That should prompt further investigation of Russia-related conclusions by Crowdstrike, the cybersecurity firm hired by the DNC, which was the only organization to examine the servers that had allegedly been hacked. It should also prompt the U.S. intelligence community to release more information about the sources of its conclusion that an arm of the Russian government had hacked the Democrats. Since the Steele Dossier made the same conclusion — adding that Trump’s team helped — an obvious question follows that has not been answered: Did U.S. intelligence rely at least in part on the information Steele had obtained while his employer was being funded by the Clinton campaign and the DNC?

Of course, collusion between the Trump camp and the Kremlin still cannot be ruled out. Putin’s people courted former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, and campaign chairman Paul Manafort had business ties to Kremlin-friendly billionaire Oleg Deripaska (who, however, is not part of Putin’s close circle). And in any case, the Russian efforts to diligently and creatively amplify the Trump’s divisive messages gave him an advantage.

It’s looking increasingly likely, however, that the Kremlin was playing both sides against each other, giving each something it wanted. That’s a classic destabilization tactic that Russia has long employed in Ukraine, feeding the local establishment’s internal conflicts.

That it got the opportunity to do so is a problem for the U.S. Both of its main parties need candidates that aren’t so easy to ensnare in international intrigue (at best) and collusion (at worst). Until that happens, Russia — and everybody else interested in humiliating the U.S. — will keep coming back to do more harm.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

To contact the author of this story:
Leonid Bershidsky at lbershidsky@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Mike Nizza at mnizza3@bloomberg.net

Reagan’s Son: Donald Trump Is A ‘Danger To The World’ And Must Be Removed
 

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The Huffington PostReagan’s Son: Donald Trump Is A ‘Danger To The World’ And Must Be Removed

Putin’s ‘Inner Circle’ Worth Nearly $24 Billion
 

mikenova shared this story from Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty.

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s circle of close friends and relatives controls a combined wealth of nearly $24 billion, although Putin has kept himself “officially” clean in terms of financial assets, says a joint report by a global investigative group and an independent Russian newspaper.

The report, titled Putin And The Proxies and published on October 24, says Putin’s inner circle is formed by “a mix of family members, old friends, and friends who became family members,” and their most lucrative businesses are either connected to the largely state-controlled oil and gas sector or linked to other state companies.

The report, which includes a list of the wealthiest members of Putin’s inner circle, is the result of a joint effort by the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP) — an international investigative reporting platform made of scores of nonprofit centers, journalists, and news organizations and independent Russian publication Novaya Gazeta.

“The one commonality in the group members’ financial success “is their connection to the president,” the report says, adding that a smaller, “more mysterious” portion of the group, which it calls “the proxies,” provides no obvious justification for the secret fortunes the investigation has found they possess.

“They claim not to be businessmen, are not known to the public, and in some cases have little idea of the riches that are registered under their names,” the investigation says, adding, “Again, they have one common attribute: they are all family or boyhood friends of Putin.”

The report singles out three people among the proxies — Mikhail Shelomov, Sergei Roldugin, and Pyotr Kolbin. Shelomov is a distant relative of Putin’s, while Kolbin and Roldugin — a butcher and a cellist, respectively — are both Putin’s childhood friends.

All three hold enormous wealth — the investigation has found that Shelomov has amassed $573 million, Kolbin is worth $550 million, and Roldugin controls offshore firms which handled $2 billion — but appear largely unaware of the firms they control, and “are at pains to explain the origins of their wealth.” That is particularly the case with Shelomov, who the report says earns an annual salary of $8,500.

The report says that their personal connections to the president raise questions about whether their assets really belong to them — or if they are merely proxies.

“It may really be Putin’s money. But in Russia, nothing is simple,” the investigation concludes.

There was no immediate reaction from the Kremlin about the report.

Russia-NATO Council To Discuss Ukraine, Afghanistan
 

mikenova shared this story from Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty.

The joint NATO-Russia Council is set to meet for a third time this year on October 26, with Ukraine and Afghanistan on the agenda.

NATO ambassadors and Russian envoy Aleksandr Grushko will gather at the alliance’s headquarters in Brussels, as relations between the West and Moscow have been seriously strained over Russia’s illegal annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea region in March 2014 and because of Moscow’s backing of separatists in eastern Ukraine.

Fighting between Kyiv’s forces and the separatists who hold parts of Ukraine’s Donetsk and Luhansk regions has killed more than 10,000 people since April 2014. Several cease-fire deals announced as part of the Minsk accords — signed in September 2014 and February 2015 pacts to put an end to the conflict — have failed to hold.

Amid strained ties, there has been a series of potentially dangerous close encounters between Russian and NATO warplanes and naval vessels in recent months.

The Russia-NATO Council — a forum intended to prevent tensions from escalating — last met in July.

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg’s office said last week that the October 26 meeting will focus on the conflicts in Ukraine and Afghanistan, as well as on ways of reducing the risk of clashes and accidents during military exercises and border surveillance.

Petr Pavel, who is chief of NATO’s Military Committee, said on October 25 that Afghanistan will be on the order of business because it is in the interest of both NATO and Russia to fight terrorism.

Russia’s special envoy to Afghanistan, Zamir Kabulov, said last week he would address the NATO-Russia Council to explain Russia’s assessment of the current situation in Afghanistan and its future potential, according to comments carried by the Interfax news agency.

The Western-backed government in Kabul is struggling to beat back insurgents in the wake of the exit of most NATO forces in 2014.

Asked about reports that Moscow is supplying arms to the Afghan Taliban, which U.S.-led coalition forces are fighting, Pavel said he had not seen any hard evidence of this.

However, he said he has seen reports that Russia is providing fuel to companies that in turn sell such fuel to the militants.

The commander of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, General John Nicholson, told a U.S. Senate committee in February that Russia had significantly increased its covert and overt support for the Taliban, with a goal of “undermining the United States and NATO.”

And in March, U.S. General Curtis Scaparrotti, NATO’s supreme allied commander in Europe, told U.S. lawmakers that he had seen evidence of increasing Russian efforts to influence the Taliban “and perhaps even to supply” the militant group.

He did not say if he meant weapons or other kinds of equipment.

Russia has rejected the allegations.

The NATO and Russian ambassadors are also expected to discuss the Zapad military exercise that Russia held with Belarus in September, which brought thousands of troops close to NATO’s eastern members and caused concerns about Moscow’s intentions given its military interference in Ukraine.

With reporting by dpa and AFP
Trump, Putin, and the Mob – Google News: Trolling President Donald Trump in Washington DC – Stuff.co.nz
 

mikenova shared this story from 1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites).


Stuff.co.nz
Trolling President Donald Trump in Washington DC
Stuff.co.nz
An inflatable chicken with Trump-like hair is pictured outside the White House. Activist Taran Singh Brar said it was a visual statement showing that Trump is to afraid to release his tax returns, stand up to Putin and is playing a ‘game of Chicken and more »

 Trump, Putin, and the Mob – Google News

morell on trump – Google News: Here’s How Clinton Campaign Cash Could Have Ended Up In The Hands Of Russian Operatives – The Daily Caller
 

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Washington Post
Here’s How Clinton Campaign Cash Could Have Ended Up In The Hands Of Russian Operatives
The Daily Caller
Morell, a Hillary Clinton supporter, expressed concerns about that information exchange during an interview in March. During an interview in March, Morrel said that it was impossible to judge the information in the dossier without understanding who the …
If Journalists Were Consistent They’d Claim Hillary ‘Colluded With Russians’ On The DossierMediaiteall 391 news articles »

 morell on trump – Google News

Trump, Supporters Go On Offense After Report Of Clinton Tie To Dossier – NPR
 

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Washington Post
Trump, Supporters Go On Offense After Report Of Clinton Tie To Dossier
NPR
Still, the president and his supporters have seized on the new details about the DNC-Clinton role to push their view that the various Russia investigations from Capitol Hill to Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller are based on a 
Clinton campaign, DNC paid for research that led to Russia dossier …Washington Post
Dossier fight could be first legal test for Hill Russia probesPolitico
Senate investigators expect Clinton campaign docs this week on Trump-Russia dossierWJLA
Mother Jones –The Federalist –WND.com
all 428 news articles »
Did Trump Family, Associates Break Law With Russia? A Guide to Potential Suspects in Mueller’s Probe – Newsweek
 

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The Independent
Did Trump Family, Associates Break Law With Russia? A Guide to Potential Suspects in Mueller’s Probe
Newsweek
It has been a big few days in the ongoing investigation into Russia’s efforts to influence the 2016 election and possibly collude with Donald Trump’s campaign. The president’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, has appeared before multiple congressional …
Manhattan US Attorney Adds to Probes of Ex-Trump Aide Manafort: ReportsU.S. News & World Report
Former Trump campaign chairman under investigation for possible money launderingThe Independent
Federal Prosecutors Issue Subpoenas in Manafort Laundering ProbeBloombergall 34 news articles »
trump, russia and the mob – Google News: ‘Putin’s Revenge’ dissects Russian leader’s motives – KSAT San Antonio
 

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KSAT San Antonio
‘Putin’s Revenge’ dissects Russian leader’s motives
KSAT San Antonio
The Russian strongman — described as being “obsessed with TV” — was especially struck and alarmed by images of Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi being beaten and killed by an angry mob. Meddling in … Kirk incorporates clips that provide reminders of 
‘Putin’s Revenge’: ‘Frontline’ explores ‘a lifetime of grievances’ against the USMinnPostall 4 news articles »

 trump, russia and the mob – Google News

cambridge analytica – Google News: Trump campaign analytics company contacted WikiLeaks about Clinton emails – CNN
 

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Business Insider
Trump campaign analytics company contacted WikiLeaks about Clinton emails
CNN
Alexander Nix, the chief executive of Cambridge Analytica, sent an email to several people including top Donald Trump donor Rebekah Mercer, relaying that he had emailed Assange seeking access to emails from Clinton’s private server to turn them into a …
The Trump campaign is scrambling to distance itself from Cambridge Analytica amid Assange-Hillary Clinton email flapBusiness Insider
Trump Campaign Distances Itself from Cambridge Analytica After Assange Connection SurfacesVanity Fair
Trump Campaign Downplays Cambridge Analytica RoleDaily Beast
Slate Magazine (blog) –The Independent –UPROXX –Daily Beast
all 46 news articles »

 cambridge analytica – Google News

Palmer Report: After being caught red handed, Donald Trump throws Cambridge Analytica under Trump-Russia bus
 

mikenova shared this story from 1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites).

Earlier today it was revealed that the head of Cambridge Analytica, the firm used by the Donald Trump campaign for voter data analysis, had reached out to WikiLeaks cyberterrorist and Russian puppet Julian Assange during the election in an attempt at conspiring to steal Hillary Clinton’s emails. This is a smoking gun confirming that the Trump campaign was indeed trying to work with Russian hackers to sabotage the election in Trump’s favor. Now, in a panicked defensive display, Trump is throwing people under the bus.

This morning’s revelation from the Daily Beast is astounding. It finally confirms what has long been widely suspected about Cambridge Analytica: rather than being magically talented at collecting and analyzing voter data, it was willing to work with thieves and thugs in the name of cheating its way to success (link). In response, Trump’s people released a statement distancing the Trump campaign from Cambridge Analytica.

Trump and his campaign are now suddenly claiming that the Republican National Committee handled its voter data analysis, and “any claims that voter data from any other source played a key role in the victory are false.” (link). This statement, of course, is a joke. Cambridge Analytica ran the Trump campaign’s voter data analysis operation from top to bottom. It operated out of the Trump campaign’s own offices. It was previously run by Steve Bannon, who then took over the Trump campaign. The company is funded by the Mercers, the same father and daughter billionaire team who largely funded the entire Trump campaign. Jared Kushner even insisted during a Forbes interview this summer that Cambridge Analytica got Trump elected.

Yet now that Cambridge Analytica has been caught red handed, Donald Trump is suddenly insisting that the company had nothing to do with his campaign. This is similar to when former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort was caught red handed taking Kremlin money, and Trump responded by claiming that Manafort had never played a meaningful role in the campaign.

The post After being caught red handed, Donald Trump throws Cambridge Analytica under Trump-Russia bus appeared first on Palmer Report.

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Russian Intelligence services – Google News: Trump campaign appears to distance itself from data firm after Assange report – The Hill
 

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The Hill
Trump campaign appears to distance itself from data firm after Assange report
The Hill
Earlier this month, Cambridge Analytica said that it had been contacted by the House Intelligence Committee for information in connection with its investigation into Russian interference. WikiLeaks released troves of emails from the personal account of
Trump Campaign’s Data Firm Contacted WikiLeaks to Ask for Access to Hacked Hillary EmailsSlate Magazine (blog)
Assange: Trump-tied firm sought WikiLeaks’ help before electionPolitico
Report: Trump ally wanted Assange to help them obtain Clinton emailsMic
Raw Story –Paste Magazine –The Inquisitr
all 38 news articles »

 Russian Intelligence services – Google News

Putin and the Russian Mafia – Google News: David Ignatius: Russia makes plans to control cyberspace – Akron Beacon Journal
 

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David Ignatius: Russia makes plans to control cyberspace
Akron Beacon Journal
Russia’s bid to rewrite global rules through the U.N. was matched by a personal pitch on cybercooperation in July from President Vladimir Putin to President Trump at the G-20 summit in Hamburg. Putin vehemently denied to Trump that Russiahad 

 Putin and the Russian Mafia – Google News

Ron Reagan: Trump is a deeply damaged human being
 

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2:52 PM 10/25/2017 Did foreign paid social media ads affect the outcome of elections 2016? Do the high quality and high power statistical study. | Michael Novakhov – In My Opinion
 

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The opinions range from:

TO:

    To answer this question, and I formulate it:
    Did foreign paid social media ads affect the outcome of elections 2016?
    Do the high quality and high power statistical study. The more or less definitive answer, within the range of probabilities, is difficult but possible. And it is vital for establishing cause-effect legal relationships in Mueller’s Investigation. M.N.  – 10.25.17
      • Did foreign paid social media ads affect the outcome of elections 2016? – GS:

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Twitter will disclose who is paying for political adverts after Russian …

Daily Mail10 hours ago
The social media giant has acted amid claims the Kremlin illicitly bankrolled an online campaign to help Donald Trump win the 2016 US …
Hillary Clinton Helped Fund the ‘Trump Dossier.’ Here’s What You Should Know About It – TIME
 

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TIME
Hillary Clinton Helped Fund the ‘Trump Dossier.’ Here’s What You Should Know About It
TIME
Has the Trump dossier come up in investigations? The Trump dossier has also come up amid the federal and congressionalinvestigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. Investigators working for Special Counsel Robert Mueller have …
Clinton Campaign and DNC Helped Fund ‘Steele Dossier’U.S. News & World Report
Clinton campaign, DNC helped fund dossier researchCNN
Clinton campaign, DNC paid for research that led to Russia dossierWashington Post
BBC News –Washington Examiner
all 325 news articles »
Elections 2016 Investigation – Google News: Assange: Trump-tied firm sought WikiLeaks help before election – Politico
 

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Assange: Trump-tied firm sought WikiLeaks help before election
Politico
One of the Trump campaign’s top data firms sought to connect with Julian Assange before the 2016 election, the Wikileaks founder said on Twitter on Wednesday. I can confirm an approach by Cambridge Analytica [prior to November last year] and can …and more »

 Elections 2016 Investigation – Google News

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8:13 AM 10/26/2017 – The E-Curtain And Control of The Cyberspace

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The E-Curtain

And Control of The Cyberspace 

 

Cyberspace, cyber control, cyber wars – 10.26.17

11:00 AM 10/25/2017 – The E-Curtain | Michael Novakhov – In My Opinion
11:49 AM 10/25/2017 – A common link is a sharp contrast to the opinion polls, pre-election, and pre-referendum… | Michael Novakhov – In My Opinion
2:52 PM 10/25/2017 – Did foreign paid social media ads affect the outcome of elections 2016? Do the high quality and high power statistical study. | Michael Novakhov – In My Opinion
5:41 PM 10/19/2017 – The Impact of Russia’s interference in the 2016 American presidential election and its outcome – Trump Investigations Report
4:16 AM 10/22/2017 – This appears to be solvable in principle by good statisticians and other researchers, which will address the dilemma… – Trump Investigations Report
Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. – The Washington Post
Former CIA station chief warns of ‘authoritarian internet’ – YouTube
Cyberspace, cyber control, cyber wars – Google Search
Cyberspace, cybercontrol, cyberwars – Google Search
Russia’s push to control cyberspace – Google Search
Russia is in alliance and in tandem with Germany, just like in their previous anti-American shenanigans! | Michael Novakhov – In My Opinion
I DO NOT LIKE YOU, FACEBOOK!  | The World News and Times

10.26.17

Who is Bill Browder? (Updated) | TrumP Россия

6:51 AM 10/26/2017

The Trump-Russia dam has broken – Palmer Report
Donald Trump just fell into a bottomless Russia pit – Palmer Report
Russia-NATO Council To Discuss Ukraine, Afghanistan
Report: Putin’s ‘Inner Circle’ Worth Nearly $24 Billion
Reagan’s Son: Donald Trump Is A ‘Danger To The World’ And Must Be Removed | HuffPost
Julian Assange Says WikiLeaks Rejected Request From Trump-Linked Firm | HuffPost
Why Clinton Camp’s Funding of the Trump Dossier Matters – Bloomberg
How Obama Used Hillary’s Dossier to Spy on Trump | Frontpage Mag

Trump – 10.25.17

Trump Investigations – 10.25.17

Trump Investigations – Google Search
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Mueller’s Russia investigation – Google Search
russian facebook ads – Google Search

News Reviewed

Trump Investigations – Google Search
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News – Cambridge Analytica, Trump, and Brexit – Google Search
russian facebook ads – Google Search
News – russian facebook ads – Google Search

Trump – Russia Investigations – 10.25 – 23.17

Andrew Weissmann, Robert Mueller’s top prosecutor, known for hardball tactics – Washington Times
James O’Keefe’s New York Times ‘Investigation’ Is an Exercise in Overwhelming Dishonesty
10.22.17 – Turning Tables in Magnitsky Case, Russia Accuses a Nemesis of Murder – The New York Times
Who Are The Major Players in Robert Mueller’s Russia Investigation?

Russian Social Media – Facebook Ads – 10.25 – 23.17

Did Russian Facebook Ads Actually Swing the Election? – Google Search
Did Russia’s Facebook Ads Actually Swing the Election? – Google Search
Did Russia’s Facebook Ads Actually Swing the Election? – Google Search
russian facebook ads – Google Search
Did Russian Facebook Ads Actually Swing the Election? – Google Search
Images – Did Russian Facebook Ads Actually Swing the Election? – Google Search
Russian Influence in Brexit Vote – Google Search
The E-Curtain – Google Search
The Russia – West E-Curtain – Google Search
Did foreign paid social media ads affect the outcome of elections 2016? – Google Search
pollster Nate Silverman – Google Search
#Russia’s Facebook Ads – Twitter Search
Russia’s Favored Outlet Is an Online News Giant. YouTube Helped. – The New York Times
10.22.17 – Hopes Dim for Congressional Russia Inquiries as Parties Clash – The New York Times
Campaigning in the Age of Facebook – Bloomberg
The U.S. and Global Security Review: “I am your robot! Meh, eh, eh…”: Tishe, tishe, tishe, malchishi-kibalchishi! – By Tom Jones, a marine adviser at Hampton Watercraft and Other Underwater Witchy Crafts Facilities
Did foreign paid social media ads affect the outcome of elections 2016? – Google Search

Cambridge Analytica – 10.25 – 21.17

Cambridge Analytica – Google Search
Cambridge Analytica software – Google Search
Cambridge Analytica and Brexit – Google Search
Cambridge Analytica, Trump, and Brexit – Google Search
Cambridge Analytica – Wikipedia
3.6.17 – Data Firm Says ‘Secret Sauce’ Aided Trump; Many Scoff – The New York Times
10.16.17 – Cambridge Analytica, the shady data firm that might be a key Trump-Russia link, explained – Vox
10.12.17 – Cambridge Analytica: Russia Probe Panel Turns to Trump Data Firm
10.11.17 – House Intel investigation expands to Trump campaign data firm | TheHill
10.11.17 – Russia Probe Now Investigating Cambridge Analytica, Trump’s ‘Psychographic’ Data Gurus
9.25.17 – Here’s What Trump-Linked Cambridge Analytica Knows About iPhone Users
9.15.17 – Did Jared Kushner’s Data Operation Help Select Facebook Targets for the Russians? | Vanity Fair
9.15.17 – Cambridge Analytica Darren Bolding says Donald Trump Facebook
6.13.17 – Privacy Advocates Criticize Kenyan Government’s Hiring of Cambridge Analytica

Cambridge Five

cambridge five – Google Search
Kim Philby – Google Search

Russian “troll farms” – 10.25.17

Russian “troll farms” on U.S. soil – Google Search
Exclusive: Russian Propaganda Traced Back to Staten Island, New York
8.13.16 – Russia’s Cyber Warfare Has Bigger Aims Than Electing Donald Trump
10.1.16 – MI5 chief not alone in voicing fears about Russian cyber-threat | World news | The Guardian

FBI Statistics – 10.23.17

9.20.17 – FBI Severely Underreported How Many Times It Authorised Informants To Break The Law | Gizmodo Australia
Trump: showboat – Google Search
fbi statistics – Google Search
fbi statistics underreporting – Google Search
fbi statistics underreporting of crimes by informants – Google Search

10.25.17

They went to Syria to fight Islamic State. Now two Americans find themselves in limbo – LA Times
Russia News and News In Russian – Новости из России и Новости на Русском языке | The Brooklyn Bridge
Россия подарила Филиппинам партию оружия | Власть | Новости | Каспаров.Ru
Ron Reagan: Trump is a deeply damaged human being | MSNBC

Video News in Russian – 6:32 AM 10/25/2017

Вирус Bad Rabbit атаковал российские СМИ / Новости – YouTube
Воздушные шары над Пуэрто-Рико – YouTube
Напавший на Фельгенгауэр арестован на два месяца – YouTube
В Австрии начнут формировать «голубую» коалицию – YouTube
Браудеру открыли дорогу в США – YouTube

10.24.17

Comey, on Twitter, Contemplates Iowa’s Landscape, Serenity and Sunsets – The New York Times

10.24.17 – Clearlake Oaks Shooting

Clearlake Oaks Shooting – Google Search
Clearlake Oaks Shooting – Twitter Search
News Reviews and Opinions: 6:40 AM 10/24/2017 – California shooting kills 2 and injures 2, including officer

Posts on Mass Shootings – 10.3.17

My Opinion – Michael Novakhov – The World Wide Times – wwtimes.com

10.23.17

News Reviews and Opinions: 8:24 AM 10/23/2017 Christopher Wray: New FBI Director Touts Importance of Partnerships With Local Police
10.23.17 – Trump officials suddenly revoke visa of hero being hunted by Putin – Shareblue Media
News – Lisa Monaco fbi – Google Search

10.22.17

Sewer of Trumpism – Google Search
impact of Russia interference in 2016 American presidential election – Google Search
Russia’s interference in the 2016 American presidential election and their outcome – Google Search
former FBI agents power influence – Google Search
Former FBI agent Michael German – Google Search
A Man Hears What He Wants to Hear…
Did Russia’s Facebook Ads Actually Swing the Election?
Clint Watts fbi – Google Search
News – Clint Watts fbi – Google Search
Michael German fbi – Google Search
Khazarian Mafia – Google Search
Trump Investigations Report – Google Search
Trump Investigations Report blogs – Google Search
Trump Investigations Report blog – Google Search
News – Khazarian Mafia – Google Search
11:23 AM 10/22/2017 – What is the “Khazarian Mafia (KM)”?  – Trump Investigations Report
Khazarian Mafia – Google Search
Search Results – Google+
The Guardian view on the fall of Raqqa: as Isis loses, Iran wins | Editorial | Opinion | The Guardian
Trump, Putin, and the New Cold War – The New Yorker

10.21.17

Trump to release JFK files, subject to ‘further information’
Trump fake Renoir – Google Search
Go figure! | Michael Novakhov – In My Opinion
RUSSIA and THE WEST – РОССИЯ и ЗАПАД: “Сильные разделываются со слабыми, умные разделываются с сильными, а правительство разделывается со всеми”

News Topics – Reviewed on 10.20.17

Trump Investigations – Google Search
Russians Posing as Black Activists on Facebook – Google Search
FBI paid for dossier – Google Search
Mike Pompeo – Google Search
Russia’s interference in the 2016 American presidential election and their outcome – Google Search
Russia’s interference in the 2016 American presidential election did not alter the outcome – Google Search
Russia’s interference in the 2016 American presidential election did alter the outcome – Google Search
Russia-sponsored troll networks – Google Search
Anonymous Online Political Ads – Google Search
Opioid Crisis – Google Search
Russian propaganda on social media – Google Search

Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks
The E-Curtain And Control of The Cyberspace – Google Search
Cyberspace, cyber control, cyber wars – Google Search
Russia’s push to control cyberspace – Google Search
Who is Bill Browder? (Updated)
Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. – The Washington Post
How Obama Used Hillarys Dossier to Spy on Trump
The Trump-Russia dam has broken
Why Clinton Camp’s Funding of the Trump Dossier Matters
Reagan’s Son: Donald Trump Is A ‘Danger To The World’ And Must Be Removed
Putin’s ‘Inner Circle’ Worth Nearly $24 Billion
Russia-NATO Council To Discuss Ukraine, Afghanistan
Trump, Putin, and the Mob – Google News: Trolling President Donald Trump in Washington DC – Stuff.co.nz
morell on trump – Google News: Here’s How Clinton Campaign Cash Could Have Ended Up In The Hands Of Russian Operatives – The Daily Caller
Trump, Supporters Go On Offense After Report Of Clinton Tie To Dossier – NPR
Did Trump Family, Associates Break Law With Russia? A Guide to Potential Suspects in Mueller’s Probe – Newsweek
trump, russia and the mob – Google News: ‘Putin’s Revenge’ dissects Russian leader’s motives – KSAT San Antonio
cambridge analytica – Google News: Trump campaign analytics company contacted WikiLeaks about Clinton emails – CNN
Palmer Report: After being caught red handed, Donald Trump throws Cambridge Analytica under Trump-Russia bus
Russian Intelligence services – Google News: Trump campaign appears to distance itself from data firm after Assange report – The Hill
Putin and the Russian Mafia – Google News: David Ignatius: Russia makes plans to control cyberspace – Akron Beacon Journal
Ron Reagan: Trump is a deeply damaged human being
2:52 PM 10/25/2017 Did foreign paid social media ads affect the outcome of elections 2016? Do the high quality and high power statistical study. | Michael Novakhov – In My Opinion
Hillary Clinton Helped Fund the ‘Trump Dossier.’ Here’s What You Should Know About It – TIME
Elections 2016 Investigation – Google News: Assange: Trump-tied firm sought WikiLeaks help before election – Politico
Did foreign paid social media ads affect the outcome of elections 2016? – Google Search

The E-Curtain And Control of The Cyberspace – Google Search

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Services Ponder How to Train Like They Fight for Cyber

Signal MagazineOct 24, 2017
In 2011, cyberspace was declared an operational domain by the secretary … the command and control(C2) framework to defend against cyber was … In cyber warfare, one of the challenges is the changing terrain, Kraft said.
Story image for Cyberspace, cyber control, cyber wars from Washington Free Beacon

DHS, FBI Warn Companies of Ongoing Cyber Attacks on Critical …

Washington Free BeaconOct 24, 2017
Worst-case scenarios in a future cyber war include destruction of critical … “The pace of international conflict and cyberspace threats has … Other methods involve targeting of industrial control system (ICS) infrastructure.
Story image for Cyberspace, cyber control, cyber wars from The Hill

Frustrated senators demand cyber war strategy from Trump

The HillOct 19, 2017
Lawmakers are growing impatient with the Trump administration on the issue of cyber war, saying the United States lacks a clear policy for …
Story image for Cyberspace, cyber control, cyber wars from Now. Powered by Northrop Grumman. (blog)

Cyberwarfare: The Most Stealthy Weapon Is Information

Now. Powered by Northrop Grumman. (blog)16 hours ago
The Stuxnet worm, which targets industrial control systems, … National Security Agency (NSA) analysts have supported war fighters in Iraq … How do you know what kind of cyber tools and techniques one side might have developed? … In cyberspace, we also lose traditional boundaries, such as borders …
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Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried.

Washington PostOct 24, 2017
Russia’s cyber-meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election has been accompanied by what U.S. and European experts describe as a …
Story image for Russia's push to control cyberspace from The Korea Herald

[David Ignatius] Russia’s worrisome push to control cyberspace

The Korea Herald2 hours ago
Russia’s cybermeddling in the 2016 US presidential election has been accompanied by what US and European experts describe as a …
Story image for Russia's push to control cyberspace from The Daily Star

Russia’s worrisome push to control cyberspace

The Daily StarOct 21, 2017
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on October 26, 2017, on page 7. Recommended. Advertisement …
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Who is Bill Browder? (Updated)

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g7czdc3zBill Browder

This much is clear: Vladimir Putin hates Bill Browder.

Browder was once the largest foreign investor in Russia and, it needs to be said, a great admirer of the Russian president. Today, he is perhaps the Putin’s regime’s fiercest critic, and Browder must derive some satisfaction in the way he grates on the Kremlin.

Browder’s change of heart came well after he was kicked out of the country in 2005. It was the death of an accountant who worked for Browder named Sergei Magnitsky that did it. Magnitsky was thrown in prison, where he was beaten and left to die in 2009 from lack of medical treatment. His crime? Magnitsky had had the temerity to expose  a massive $230 million tax fraud perpetrated by Russian officials.

In response, Browder lobbied Congress to draft legislation imposing sanctions on the Russian officials responsible for Magnitsky’s death. The Magnitsky Act was signed into law by President Obama in 2012.  Browder has continued his campaign in Canada, the United States, and Europe —  and it has driven Russian officials bat-shit insane.

Russian legislators responded to the Magnitsky Act by banning adoption of Russian children by Americans — harming their most vulnerable citizens for what, political retaliation? A year later, in a shameful display of injustice, a Moscow court convicted Magnitsky of tax evasion in a posthumous trial. (Browder was found guilty of fraud in absentia.) The Trump campaign was drawn into a June 2016 meeting with Russians on the Magnitsky Act when the future president’s son was promised dirt on Hillary Clinton.

In the latest hysterical response, now it’s Browder who is suspected of murdering Magnitsky. According to Russian prosecutors, Browder colluded with a British intelligence agent to convince Russian prison doctors to withhold care for Magnitsky. The evidence is comical: poorly written communications that were allegedly intercepted from Western spy agencies.

Russia managed to get Browder briefly banned from entry to the United States by putting him on an Interpol wanted list. His visa privileges were restored by the Trump administration on Monday after members of Congress and the press leaped to Browder’s defense.

The reason the Magnitsky Act drives the Kremlin nuts is that it hits the kleptocrats in their unprotected flank. Russian oligarchs and the kleptocrats who steal from the state store their assets in the West. And what is the point of stealing a fortune from the Russian people if you can’t buy condos in Miami or Manhattan or send your kids to exclusive British schools because of some lousy sanctions?

Browder has rightly been praised for his courage in standing up to the Putin regime. And his book, Red Notice, is an excellent read.  However, the laudatory coverage Browder regularly receives from a press corps he has skillfully cultivated and his star treatment before a US Congress he lobbies require a selective reading of events.

The fact is that Browder was once one of Putin’s biggest cheerleaders, as he admitted during deposition:

Q: So in 2005, you were quite a supporter of Vladimir Putin’s, right?

A: Correct.

Most gallingly, he defended the 2003 arrest of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, the head of Yukos, one of the world’s biggest oil producers. Stalin would have approved of the way Khodorkovsky was convicted, imprisoned in a gulag at Russia’s border with China, and then put on trial and convicted again. His  company was seized and acquired by the state.

It wasn’t exactly clear what Khodorovsky had done wrong except he had criticized Russia’s corruption during a televised meeting with President Putin a few months before his arrest and funded a movement promoting the rule of law and democratic values called Open Russia.

Khodorkovsky’s arrest and the seizure of Yukos wasn’t democracy; it was Mafia tactics. But Browder hailed Khodorkovsky’s arrest as progress toward Russia’s return to greatness:

Putin, was only doing “what any leader would do to further his nation’s interests,”  Browder wrote. “While there may be some things about Putin that we disagree with, we should give him the benefit of the doubt in this area and fully support him in his task of taking back control of the country from the oligarchs.”

As for Khodorkovsky, Browder said he was hiding something. “Khodorkovsky collected an enormous pile of cheap assets from the government and minority shareholders, and then embarked on an impressive charm and lobbying offensive to legitimize himself and his wealth. He has been very successful in getting people to forget his not-so-distant past,” Browder wrote.

Now, it’s Browder who has been very successful in getting people to forget his not-so-distant past. Putin’s No. 1 enemy, as he describes himself, was once Putin’s No. 1 fan.(To his credit, he did expose corruption at the companies in which he invested such as the gas giant Gazprom, and this made powerful enemies.)

Here is part of a presentation by Browder in April 2005 titled Seven Big Myths About Russia

Screen Shot 2017-10-25 at 11.06.33 AMHere’s how The Wall Street Journal described Browder in 2006 after he had been kicked out of Russia:

Browder has been one of the most outspoken supporters among foreign investors of Russian President Vladimir Putin. He argued tirelessly that the western media and critics of the Kremlin were misreading the situation and that Putin’s administration was good for investors. He was defending the Kremlin as recently as January, when Browder spoke at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

That’s right. Browder was still defending Putin even after he was denied entry to the country.

Why such love for Putin? In deposition, Browder says the two men never met. The answer: It was just business. Investing in Russia was very profitable. His fund, Hermitage Capital Management, recorded $1 billion in profits and Browder pocketed $130 million in 2006.

When Browder was denied entry to Russia, ostensibly as a threat to national security, his Hermitage Capital Management was the country’s largest foreign investor with $4 billion in Russian equities. Like Khodorkovsky before him, Browder appeared to have made the mistake of believing that he was untouchable. Who in their right mind would ban the man who brought billions into the Russian economy?

Browder’s lobbying of US politicians and courts would sit better with me had he not given up his U.S. citizenship. In 1998, Browder obtained a passport from the more Russophilic United Kingdom. Published reports say he did this for tax reasons but gave a different explanation during deposition:

Q. So why did you give up your U.S. citizenship?

A. Personal reasons.

Q. And what are those personal reasons?

A. My family was persecuted during the McCarthy era….

Q. What kind of persecution did you face?

A. My grandmother was sick with cancer and the U.S. Government tried to deport her to Russia when she was dying. [Browder’s grandfather, Earl Browder, led the Communist Party in the United States.]

Q. What year was that?

A. In 1950 something.

Q. I see. And so 1998, this all came back as a rush of emotion and you decided to give up your U.S. citizenship?

A. No.

Interestingly, Britain, Browder’s new home, has been much slower to take up the Magnitsky cause. (A bill passed the House of Commons this year and is now being considered in the House of Lords.)  The Brits have a conflicted relationship with Russian rubles: They have to come to depend on them.  London is where Kremlin insiders like to stash their money. It’s where they buy homes through shell companies, go shopping and send their children to posh schools.  Billions of pounds have washed through Britain since the fall of the Soviet Union, although nobody knows exactly how much. A group even offers kleptocracy tours of London.

Browder has been demanding justice for Sergei Magnitsky — and rightfully so — but, at least in one instance, he literally ran away from an American court.  Here is what happened when a process server tried to serve Browder with a subpoena in New York following his 2015 appearance on The Daily Show:

The case involved a Russian financier named Denis Katsyv. At the time, Katsyv was accused in federal court of laundering money that was part of the fraud that Sergei Magnitsky uncovered. The case that was based on information Browder provided  to prosecutors in New York.¹   Browder eventually did have to testify and I’ve posted Browder’s Deposition.

Am I wrong in thinking that it’s grossly unfair and somewhat suspicious for Browder to demand justice for Magnitsky while fleeing a subpoena in the case he instigated?  Shouldn’t he be proud to stand up for his late friend and colleague?

Please don’t mistake what I’m saying here. I’m no fan of Putin, but Browder is undermining his own cause when he selectively uses the law and the press to serve only his own interests.

1. Katsyv’s case, U.S. v Prevezon Holdings, was settled for $5.9 million before trial.

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Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. – The Washington Post

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Russian President Vladimir Putin. (Sergei Chirikov/Reuters)

 Opinion writer

October 24 at 7:35 PM 

Russia’s cyber-meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election has been accompanied by what U.S. and European experts describe as a worrisome Kremlin campaign to rewrite the rules for global cyberspace.

A draft of a Russian proposal for a new “United Nations Convention on Cooperation in Combating Information Crimes” was recently shown to me by a security expert who obtained a copy. The 54-page document includes 72 proposed articles, covering collection of Internet traffic by authorities, “codes of conduct” for cyberspace and “joint investigation” of malicious activity. The language sounds bureaucratic and harmless, but experts say that if adopted, it would allow Russia to squeeze cyberspace even more.

The Kremlin’s proposed convention would enhance the ability of Russia and other authoritarian nations to control communication within their countries, and to gain access to communications in other countries, according to several leading U.S. cyber experts. They described the latest draft as part of Moscow’s push over the past decade to shape the legal architecture of what Russian strategists like to call the “information space.”

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The proposal was floated by the Kremlin early this year, and outlined in an April 4 article in Kommersant. The Moscow daily reported that the Russian Foreign Ministry had described the convention as an “innovative” and “universal” attempt to replace the 2001 Budapest Convention, which has been signed by the United States and 55 other countries but rejected by Russia. Kommersant said “Russian authorities saw a threat to the sovereignty of the country” in the Budapest pact.

Russia’s bid to rewrite global rules through the United Nations was matched by a personal pitch on cyber-cooperation in July from President Vladimir Putin to President Trump at the Group of 20 summit in Hamburg. Putin “vehemently denied” to Trump that Russia had interfered in the U.S. election, Trump said in a tweet. Trump then floated a mystifying proposal: “Putin & I discussed forming an impenetrable Cyber Security unit so that election hacking, & many other negative things, will be guarded and safe.”

Trump’s suggestion that America join Russia in cyberdefense provoked an uproar in the United States. One Twitter commentator wrote: “This is like the FBI asking the Mafia to form an anti-crime unit together.”

The White House quickly backtracked after Trump’s tweet. Homeland security adviser Tom Bossert told reporters on July 14: “I don’t believe that the U.S. and Russia have come to that point yet in cyberspace. And until we do, we wouldn’t have the conversation about partnership.”

Many U.S. cyber experts share Bossert’s view that although any formal treaty or partnership with Moscow now is unwise, quiet confidence-building discussions might be useful. Those could include military-to-military or technical contacts to explore how to avoid catastrophic cyber-events that might cripple strategic systems or pose systemic risk.

U.S. and Russian officials had maintained such a dialogue to explore norms for the Internet, but so far it has been a dead end. The Russians were led by Andrey Krutskikh, a foreign ministry official who is Putin’s cyber adviser; and on the U.S. side, by Christopher Painter, who was White House cyber chief under President Barack Obama and then cyber coordinator at the State Department, a post he left this year.

These contacts are sensible, but they have withered as U.S.-Russia relations have deteriorated. A high-level working group stopped meeting after Russia invaded Ukraine in 2014. A U.N.-sponsored Group of Governmental Experts on Information Security broke up in June after failing to reach consensus on measures for improving information security. Putin’s bilateral proposal at Hamburg quickly disappeared after Trump’s premature endorsement.

The Russians, meanwhile, continue their campaign to regulate cyberspace on their terms, by mobilizing allies to support their alternative to the Budapest convention; Moscow’s biggest complaint is that the Budapest framework, in Article 32 (b), allows the owners of data to control its use, rather than governments. Moscow wants state control of information.

Russia got some global support for its effort at a September gathering in Xiamen, China, of the so-called BRICS countries: Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. In their formal declaration, the countries “recognize the need for a universal regulatory binding instrument on combatting the criminal use of ICTs [information and communications technologies] under the UN auspices.” The countries “acknowledge the initiative” of Russia in seeking such a binding pact.

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Decoding Internet Security: Cyberweapons
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Here’s what you need to know about what cyberweapons are and when they have been used in the past. (Dani Player, Sarah Parnass/The Washington Post)
Here’s what you need to know about what cyberweapons are and when they have been used in the past. (Dani Player,Sarah Parnass/The Washington Post)

If the events of the past year have taught us anything, it’s that Russia views information as a decisive political weapon and wants to control this potential battle space. The global regulatory side of this contest gets little attention, but it could help determine whether open information flows survive in the age of the autocrats.

Twitter: @IgnatiusPost

Read more from David Ignatius’s archivefollow him on Twitter or subscribe to his updates on Facebook.

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How Obama Used Hillary’s Dossier to Spy on Trump

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Daniel Greenfield, a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the Freedom Center, is an investigative journalist and writer focusing on the radical left and Islamic terrorism.

How do you legally spy on your political opponents?

At some point in time that question was asked in the White House, at the DNC or in the hotel suites where Hillary and her staff were staying during her speaking tours. It wasn’t exactly asked that way.

But it was asked. And now we know more of the answer.

What Hillary and Obama did wasn’t Watergate. That was amateur hour. Its sophistication is a tribute to the left’s deep knowledge and control of the workings of Washington, D.C. The men and women who planned this and carried it out understood not only government, but had an intimate familiarity with the loopholes in the laws and the networks of contacts that could realize their highly illegal plans.

The eavesdropping on Trump officials carried the ‘fingerprints’ of an administration that bypassed Congress to fund left-wing groups by blackmailing banks into huge settlements paid out to political allies in a billion dollar slush fund and sent pallets of foreign currency to Iran on unmarked planes. A complete lack of ethical norms was combined with the careful use of legal loopholes to protect the actions of the perpetrators even while they were engaging in a criminal conspiracy.

The revolutionary cell is embedded into left-wing organizing. These cells combined into networks across government, the media and the non-profit sector to pursue a collective agenda. The latest revelations about the Trump dossier give us greater insight into how Obama and Hillary’s people conspired to legally eavesdrop on political opponents by breaking up that eavesdropping into a series of legal actions carried out across different cells.

The road that led to Susan Rice and Samantha Power ‘unmasking’ Trump officials began with the Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee funding a dossier pushing Trump-Russia conspiracies. The dossier was sourced through Fusion GPS which is notorious for handfeeding material to reporters.

The Clinton campaign was seeing to it that whatever Fusion GPS produced would make its way into media stories without having Hillary’s fingerprints on it. Indeed the only reason we learned that Hillary and the DNC were ultimately behind the dossier was a congressional subpoena that risked exposing other Fusion GPS clients.

But the second reason was far more devious and devastating.

Fusion GPS’ man for the job was Christopher Steele. The former British intelligence figure had connections with FBI people. Hillary Clinton wasn’t just doing “opposition research” as her former press secretary has claimed.  The best way to do opposition research in an American election doesn’t involve hiring a Brit in London with contacts in Russian intelligence and the FBI.

That is however the best way to independently produce information that can be injected into an intelligence investigation. (It’s also, perhaps not coincidentally, a great way for the Russians to inject their own material into a presidential election without getting their fingerprints on it.)

Hiring Fusion GPS and then Steele created two degrees of separation between the dossier and Hillary. A London ex-intel man is a strange choice for opposition research in an American election, but a great choice to create a plausible ‘source’ that appears completely disconnected from American politics.

What would an ex-M.I.6 agent have to do with Hillary, Obama or Trump?

The official story is that Steele was a dedicated whistleblower who decided to message an FBI pal for reasons “above party politics” while the Fusion GPS boss was so dedicated that he spent his ownmoney on it after the election. Some figures in the FBI decided to take Steele’s material, offering to pay him for his work and reimbursing some of his expenses. Portions of the dossier were used to justify the FISA eavesdropping on Trump officials and were then rolled into the Mueller investigation.

That is how cells coordinate by breaking up a larger plot into a series of individual actions that just happen to produce the ideal result. Hillary and the DNC hire Fusion GPS. Fusion GPS hires Steele. Steele contacts an FBI pal. The FBI takes up the dossier. And then it’s turned into a pretext for eavesdropping.

But there isn’t supposed to be a link between the Democrats and the eavesdropping.

That’s why Marc Elias, the Clinton campaign and DNC lawyer who hired Fusion GPS, had denied it in the past. It’s why Fusion GPS fought the investigation so desperately. Opposition research isn’t a crime. A conspiracy to eavesdrop on your political opponents however is very much a criminal matter.

A forensic examination of the dirty dossier’s journey shows us that this modern Watergate was a collaborative effort between an outgoing Democrat administration and its expected Dem successor. The effort was broken up into two big pieces. The Clinton side would generate the material. The Obama side would make use of it. Steele was positioned as the interface between the two sides of the effort.

The London detour created and laundered the dossier. Moving the operation offshore tangled the connection between the Clinton side and the Obama side. This was important because what Steele produced wasn’t really opposition research, but a pretext for a government investigation.

That pretext couldn’t come directly from Hillary. But the FBI was too politically divided to generate it.

Obama Inc. needed that pretext, but it also didn’t want to generate it internally. Any investigation of the political opposition was inherently explosive. It was better if the intelligence came from outside and especially overseas. That was why Fusion GPS brought in Steele.

The first FISA request was filed in June. It was shot down by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. That was the same month we were told that Fusion GPS hired Steele. The second FISA request came through in October. That was the month, Steele did his first media interview with Mother Jones.

Two birds were being killed with one stone.

Obama’s Watergate depended on extensive compartmentalization. The process that led to the eavesdropping on Trump officials and their unmasking at the hands of his officials had to appear as ‘clean’ as possible. Susan Rice and Samantha Power could make unmasking requests to the NSA, but they couldn’t be involved in generating the investigation that led to those requests.

Seeding the media with an astroturf campaign through Fusion GPS created the appearance of an organic push to investigate Trump-Russia ties. Targeting the lefty fringe of the media, Mother JonesThe Guardian, would bake in the narrative among a demographic already prone to conspiracy theories.

The operation was vastly more sophisticated than the crude ugliness of Watergate. But it was not unique in that regard. The fusion of government loopholes, political campaigns, media operations, opposition research and covert funding had occurred more than once during the Obama era.

The most recent example of such a fusion before Trump-Russia was the Iran Deal in which members of Congress were eavesdropped on, money was moved around through non-profits to influence the media, a White House operation planted stories in the media and billions were smuggled to Iran. This mixture of influence operation, propaganda, eavesdropping and laundering has likely happened far more often in the previous administration than we know.

The IRS targeting of conservatives, shutdown theater and the Libyan War offer more examples.

Obama’s eavesdropping on Trump didn’t break the norms. They had already been thoroughly broken. The network that is being uncovered, the interfaces between media insiders, top government officials and private interests, demonstrates why Obama Inc. believed that it could get away with it.

It had gotten away with all its old abuses. There was no reason to doubt it could do so again.

America still has elections. The rule of law exists. In theory. But the network being uncovered in the dossier investigation looks very much like something that would be found in a totalitarian state.

The combination of media propaganda, government surveillance and contrived investigations of political opponents is the sort of thing you would expect to find in… Russia. The key players were wary enough that they compartmentalized their conspiracy, breaking it up across the private and public sector, the media, private firms, law enforcement figures and even another country. But that just makes it look like a cross between terrorist cells and organized crime.

And that is what we are dealing with here.

The left’s networks are becoming increasingly malignant. They executed a sophisticated attack on the political process while contriving to blame it on their victims. What the attack reveals is just how much the levers of power in our political system are embedded in the shadowy networks that operate in and around government. And what those networks are willing to do to win.

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The Trump-Russia dam has broken

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So there it is, finally, in plain sight for all to see. The collusion between the Donald Trump campaign and Russia is no longer merely centered around secret meetings with vague agendas, happenstance too remarkable to have been coincidence, and a thousand poorly understood connections. Now we have something entirely different, and it changes everything: a confession that the Trump campaign truly was trying to coordinate with Russia on the deep, dark, gritty kind of stuff that election rigging is made of.

The head of Cambridge Analytica, the voter data analysis firm that everyone from Jared Kushner on down has publicly credited for Donald Trump’s bizarre election victory, has been caught confessing that he tried to work with WikiLeaks to steal Hillary Clinton’s emails. Don’t let the imaginary half-degree of separation fool you here: Cambridge Analytica was the Donald Trump campaign. Trump is now claiming that the company only played a minor role in his campaign, so he can paint it as having acted on its own. Bullshit. This is everything.

It’s why Trump and his allies are now putting down their few remaining chips on the hilariously phony scandal about President Obama and Hillary Clinton and Russia and Uranium. It’s a joke of a fake story, but it’s the only desperate card they have left to play. It’s why most of the Republicans in Congress, even the ones like Chuck Grassley who had been willing to go along with the Trump-Russia investigation, are now suddenly trying to sabotage that investigation from within. The GOP didn’t want to have to get its hands dirty like this, but it’s now desperate to create the kind of distraction that might prop up Trump just long enough so it can get its tax bill rammed through.

What we’re seeing now is pure panic from anyone who still cares about Donald Trump, or still needs him a bit longer. Even if it’ll take a moment for the public to figure out that the Cambridge Analytica confession is the bombshell of the Trump-Russia scandal to date, Trump’s own side has immediately grasped that this is the bottomless pit from which there is no emerging.

We now have proof that the voter data analysis arm of the Donald Trump campaign was actively seeking to collude with Russian-controlled hacker thugs and criminals. It’s just a matter of time before we see proof that these efforts did lead to collusion, and that Trump and Russia did conspire to rig the election. The dam has broken. There’s no going back. It’s why we’re suddenly seeing borderline pandemonium. It’s about to get even more crazy.

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Bill Palmer is the publisher of the political news outlet Palmer Report

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Why Clinton Camp’s Funding of the Trump Dossier Matters

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The news that Hillary Clinton’s campaign and the Democratic National Committee paid for former U.K. spy Christopher Steele’s investigation into Donald Trump showed one thing: Rarely have two political candidates been so worthy of each other in terms of cynicism as Clinton and Donald Trump. No wonder Russian President Vladimir Putin, another world-class cynic, dealt himself in.

QuickTake Vladimir Putin

Democrats were indignant when it turned out that Donald Trump Jr., the candidate’s son, was willing to accept damaging information about Clinton from a Russian source. No dirt was forthcoming in that case, though: Instead, a suburban Russian lawyer fighting for the interests of her client, sanctioned under the Magnitsky Act in the U.S., came to see Trump campaign officials to lobby against the law, not to share intelligence.

In the Clinton case, Fusion GPS, the firm working on the Trump opposition research, paid Steele, a foreigner, with the campaign’s money. The U.K., of course, is a U.S. ally; Russia is an adversary. But the information Steele produced came mainly from Russian sources. Unlike lawyer Natalya Veselnitskaya, who once did legal work for the FSB domestic intelligence in a minor property dispute, these sources were really well-connected, if Steele is to be believed. They included, according to the version of his dossier published by Buzzfeed, “a senior Russian Foreign ministry figure,” “a former top level Russian intelligence officer still active inside the Kremlin,” “a senior Russian financial official” and “a senior Kremlin official.”

In Moscow’s paranoid political climate, with the Kremlin seeing foreign agents everywhere and the FSB eager to earn its bread, what was the upside for these sources in sharing explosive secrets with a foreigner? The downside is clear: The standard prison sentence for espionage, handed down in recent spying cases, was 12 years — at the lower bound of the Russian criminal code’s range of 12 to 20. As a private operative, Steele couldn’t even offer his informants the thin protection that comes with working for a foreign intelligence agency, which might help a valuable agent if push came to shove.

But if the FSB and the Kremlin knew of Clinton’s interest in putting together a dossier on Trump, all these people had an excellent reason to talk, and especially to provide nonsensical information — such as that Dmitry Peskov, Putin’s press secretary, and not anyone in Russia’s intelligence community, was the keeper of a top-secret file on Trump. It was always obvious from the Steele reports that his sources were having fun spinning tall tales for him; since he wasn’t required to verify them and vouch for their accuracy — that’s the nature of raw intelligence — Steele faithfully wrote them down on Fusion GPS’s time.

Russia has never hid or denied its propaganda campaign during the U.S. election — except the elements of “active measures” it included: The rallies Kremlin trolls attempted to organize in the U.S. hinterland through Facebook ads, perhaps (but not definitely) the distribution of Democrats’ stolen emails to the media. These fit in nicely with the possible use of a Brit on Clinton’s payroll as a disinformation channel. Now that the nature of Russian activity on social networks has come to light, it’s likelier than ever that the goal of the whole exercise was to sow discord and instability in the U.S. Pushing Russian-generated kompromat on Trump to Clinton would have served that purpose brilliantly.

The Clinton campaign and the DNC reportedly started paying Fusion GPS in April, 2016, which was after the FBI warned about potential Russian hacking and several months before the DNC publicly confirmed that its network was breached by groups tied to Russian intelligence. It’s likely that, even before that announcement, the Democrats had been planning to use the Russian angle against Trump. That should prompt further investigation of Russia-related conclusions by Crowdstrike, the cybersecurity firm hired by the DNC, which was the only organization to examine the servers that had allegedly been hacked. It should also prompt the U.S. intelligence community to release more information about the sources of its conclusion that an arm of the Russian government had hacked the Democrats. Since the Steele Dossier made the same conclusion — adding that Trump’s team helped — an obvious question follows that has not been answered: Did U.S. intelligence rely at least in part on the information Steele had obtained while his employer was being funded by the Clinton campaign and the DNC?

Of course, collusion between the Trump camp and the Kremlin still cannot be ruled out. Putin’s people courted former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, and campaign chairman Paul Manafort had business ties to Kremlin-friendly billionaire Oleg Deripaska (who, however, is not part of Putin’s close circle). And in any case, the Russian efforts to diligently and creatively amplify the Trump’s divisive messages gave him an advantage.

It’s looking increasingly likely, however, that the Kremlin was playing both sides against each other, giving each something it wanted. That’s a classic destabilization tactic that Russia has long employed in Ukraine, feeding the local establishment’s internal conflicts.

That it got the opportunity to do so is a problem for the U.S. Both of its main parties need candidates that aren’t so easy to ensnare in international intrigue (at best) and collusion (at worst). Until that happens, Russia — and everybody else interested in humiliating the U.S. — will keep coming back to do more harm.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

To contact the author of this story:
Leonid Bershidsky at lbershidsky@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Mike Nizza at mnizza3@bloomberg.net

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Reagan’s Son: Donald Trump Is A ‘Danger To The World’ And Must Be Removed

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The Huffington PostReagan’s Son: Donald Trump Is A ‘Danger To The World’ And Must Be Removed

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Putin’s ‘Inner Circle’ Worth Nearly $24 Billion

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Russian President Vladimir Putin’s circle of close friends and relatives controls a combined wealth of nearly $24 billion, although Putin has kept himself “officially” clean in terms of financial assets, says a joint report by a global investigative group and an independent Russian newspaper.

The report, titled Putin And The Proxies and published on October 24, says Putin’s inner circle is formed by “a mix of family members, old friends, and friends who became family members,” and their most lucrative businesses are either connected to the largely state-controlled oil and gas sector or linked to other state companies.

The report, which includes a list of the wealthiest members of Putin’s inner circle, is the result of a joint effort by the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP) — an international investigative reporting platform made of scores of nonprofit centers, journalists, and news organizations and independent Russian publication Novaya Gazeta.

“The one commonality in the group members’ financial success “is their connection to the president,” the report says, adding that a smaller, “more mysterious” portion of the group, which it calls “the proxies,” provides no obvious justification for the secret fortunes the investigation has found they possess.

“They claim not to be businessmen, are not known to the public, and in some cases have little idea of the riches that are registered under their names,” the investigation says, adding, “Again, they have one common attribute: they are all family or boyhood friends of Putin.”

The report singles out three people among the proxies — Mikhail Shelomov, Sergei Roldugin, and Pyotr Kolbin. Shelomov is a distant relative of Putin’s, while Kolbin and Roldugin — a butcher and a cellist, respectively — are both Putin’s childhood friends.

All three hold enormous wealth — the investigation has found that Shelomov has amassed $573 million, Kolbin is worth $550 million, and Roldugin controls offshore firms which handled $2 billion — but appear largely unaware of the firms they control, and “are at pains to explain the origins of their wealth.” That is particularly the case with Shelomov, who the report says earns an annual salary of $8,500.

The report says that their personal connections to the president raise questions about whether their assets really belong to them — or if they are merely proxies.

“It may really be Putin’s money. But in Russia, nothing is simple,” the investigation concludes.

There was no immediate reaction from the Kremlin about the report.

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Russia-NATO Council To Discuss Ukraine, Afghanistan

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The joint NATO-Russia Council is set to meet for a third time this year on October 26, with Ukraine and Afghanistan on the agenda.

NATO ambassadors and Russian envoy Aleksandr Grushko will gather at the alliance’s headquarters in Brussels, as relations between the West and Moscow have been seriously strained over Russia’s illegal annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea region in March 2014 and because of Moscow’s backing of separatists in eastern Ukraine.

Fighting between Kyiv’s forces and the separatists who hold parts of Ukraine’s Donetsk and Luhansk regions has killed more than 10,000 people since April 2014. Several cease-fire deals announced as part of the Minsk accords — signed in September 2014 and February 2015 pacts to put an end to the conflict — have failed to hold.

Amid strained ties, there has been a series of potentially dangerous close encounters between Russian and NATO warplanes and naval vessels in recent months.

The Russia-NATO Council — a forum intended to prevent tensions from escalating — last met in July.

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg’s office said last week that the October 26 meeting will focus on the conflicts in Ukraine and Afghanistan, as well as on ways of reducing the risk of clashes and accidents during military exercises and border surveillance.

Petr Pavel, who is chief of NATO’s Military Committee, said on October 25 that Afghanistan will be on the order of business because it is in the interest of both NATO and Russia to fight terrorism.

Russia’s special envoy to Afghanistan, Zamir Kabulov, said last week he would address the NATO-Russia Council to explain Russia’s assessment of the current situation in Afghanistan and its future potential, according to comments carried by the Interfax news agency.

The Western-backed government in Kabul is struggling to beat back insurgents in the wake of the exit of most NATO forces in 2014.

Asked about reports that Moscow is supplying arms to the Afghan Taliban, which U.S.-led coalition forces are fighting, Pavel said he had not seen any hard evidence of this.

However, he said he has seen reports that Russia is providing fuel to companies that in turn sell such fuel to the militants.

The commander of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, General John Nicholson, told a U.S. Senate committee in February that Russia had significantly increased its covert and overt support for the Taliban, with a goal of “undermining the United States and NATO.”

And in March, U.S. General Curtis Scaparrotti, NATO’s supreme allied commander in Europe, told U.S. lawmakers that he had seen evidence of increasing Russian efforts to influence the Taliban “and perhaps even to supply” the militant group.

He did not say if he meant weapons or other kinds of equipment.

Russia has rejected the allegations.

The NATO and Russian ambassadors are also expected to discuss the Zapad military exercise that Russia held with Belarus in September, which brought thousands of troops close to NATO’s eastern members and caused concerns about Moscow’s intentions given its military interference in Ukraine.

With reporting by dpa and AFP
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Trump, Putin, and the Mob – Google News: Trolling President Donald Trump in Washington DC – Stuff.co.nz

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Stuff.co.nz
Trolling President Donald Trump in Washington DC
Stuff.co.nz
An inflatable chicken with Trump-like hair is pictured outside the White House. Activist Taran Singh Brar said it was a visual statement showing that Trump is to afraid to release his tax returns, stand up to Putin and is playing a ‘game of Chicken 

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 Trump, Putin, and the Mob – Google News

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morell on trump – Google News: Here’s How Clinton Campaign Cash Could Have Ended Up In The Hands Of Russian Operatives – The Daily Caller

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Washington Post
Here’s How Clinton Campaign Cash Could Have Ended Up In The Hands Of Russian Operatives
The Daily Caller
Morell, a Hillary Clinton supporter, expressed concerns about that information exchange during an interview in March. During an interview in March, Morrel said that it was impossible to judge the information in the dossier without understanding who the …
If Journalists Were Consistent They’d Claim Hillary ‘Colluded With Russians’ On The DossierMediaite

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Trump, Supporters Go On Offense After Report Of Clinton Tie To Dossier – NPR

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Washington Post
Trump, Supporters Go On Offense After Report Of Clinton Tie To Dossier
NPR
Still, the president and his supporters have seized on the new details about the DNC-Clinton role to push their view that the various Russia investigations — from Capitol Hill to Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller — are based on a 
Clinton campaign, DNC paid for research that led to Russia dossier …Washington Post
Dossier fight could be first legal test for Hill Russia probesPolitico
Senate investigators expect Clinton campaign docs this week on Trump-Russia dossierWJLA
Mother Jones –The Federalist –WND.com
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Did Trump Family, Associates Break Law With Russia? A Guide to Potential Suspects in Mueller’s Probe – Newsweek

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The Independent
Did Trump Family, Associates Break Law With Russia? A Guide to Potential Suspects in Mueller’s Probe
Newsweek
It has been a big few days in the ongoing investigation into Russia’s efforts to influence the 2016 election and possibly collude with Donald Trump’s campaign. The president’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, has appeared before multiple congressional …
Manhattan US Attorney Adds to Probes of Ex-Trump Aide Manafort: ReportsU.S. News & World Report
Former Trump campaign chairman under investigation for possible money launderingThe Independent
Federal Prosecutors Issue Subpoenas in Manafort Laundering Probe