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Trump Investigations Report | Latest Posts

Trump Investigations Report from mikenova (18 sites)
Trump Investigations Report: 10:06 AM 10/26/2017 Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split

10:06 AM 10/26/2017 – Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump split – Google Search Thursday October 26th, 2017 at 10:00 AM Republican Party Pro-Trump Vs Anti-Trump Split – Google News 1 Share 2 Breitbart alumni just abandoned the most Pro-Trump candidate of … Vox–Oct 23, 2017 Kelli Ward, the Republican primary challenger to Sen. … Continue reading“10:06 AM 10/26/2017 – Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split”Trump Investigations Report

Trump – from Huffington Post

Trump – from Huffington Post from mikenova (2 sites)
Donald Trump: Donald Trump Throws U.S. Generals Under The Bus In Regard To Niger Attack

And that’s not presidential, experts say.

Donald Trump

Trump News Review

1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites)
trump russian ties – Google News: 51% Say Lawbreaking Likely in Clinton Dealings With Russia – Rasmussen Reports
Donald Trump: Donald Trump Throws U.S. Generals Under The Bus In Regard To Niger Attack
trump under federal investigation – Google News: Trump has spent $1.75 million on White House redecorations – The Hill (blog)
Russian Intelligence services – Google News: Catalonia Latest Target in Russian Active Measures Campaign – Government Accountability Project (blog)
russia helping trump – Google News: Pretty disturbing. Senator slams Trump for ignoring law requiring Russia sanctions – Shareblue Media
putin won US 2016 election – Google News: How ‘Putin’s Revenge’ became Trump’s victory – Yahoo News Canada (blog)
crime and terror – Google News: It’s time for the ATF to refocus its mission – FederalNewsRadio.com
Trump Investigations Report: 10:06 AM 10/26/2017 Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split
Donald Trump: Anna Wintour Reveals She Wouldn’t Invite Donald Trump To The Met Gala Again
Comey – Google News: Howard University Activists Say School is Banning Them From James Comey Lecture – News One
Donald Trump: Top Democrat Rips Trump’s ‘Dangerous’ Pick To Lead NASA
trump as samson – Google News: ‘Witch’s Court’ Continues To Trump ‘Temperature of Love’ In Rating’s Race – Korea Portal (English Edition)
Elections 2016 Investigation – Google News: As Panel Questions Trump Associates, GOP Launches New Probes – In Homeland Security (blog)
Trump Investigations Report: 9:49 AM 10/26/2017 More than 2 months after declaring an opioid crisis, Trump appears to have decided how to proceed Mic
Donald Trump: Jimmy Kimmel Cuts Donald Trump’s ‘Standing Ovations’ Down To Size
Donald Trump | The Guardian: Trump to declare health emergency over opioids but no new funds to help
trump under federal investigation – Google News: White House: Trump to declare opioid crisis a public health emergency – The Hill
trump and republican party – Google News: Trump: ‘We Have Great Unity In The Republican Party’ – CBS Minnesota / WCCO
Trump anxiety – Google News: Trump solidifies his grip on GOP with the exits of Flake, Corker – AZCentral.com
Putin and the Russian Mafia – Google News: Ignatius: Russia’s worrisome push to rewrite cyberspace rules – The Daily Herald
trump russian candidate – Google News: Rep. Schiff On Trump Dossier: Sometimes Opposition Research Is True – RealClearPolitics

 

Saved Stories – 1. Trump
The Early Edition: October 26, 2017
Trump crosses another line – Washington Post
As panel questions Trump associates, GOP launches new probes – STLtoday.com
Republicans Launch New Investigations Into Clinton Email Probe, Uranium Deal – NPR
Republican committees investigate Clinton and Obama – BBC News
Republicans look past Trump scandals, zero in on Hillary Clinton – MSNBC
Robert Mueller Tightens Paul Manafort’s Noose – Vanity Fair
Clinton campaign, DNC paid for research that led to Russia dossier … – Washington Post
The Senate Judiciary Committee’s Russia Probe Just Blew Up – Mother Jones
Trump’s consistent refrain: There is not now and never will be proof of Russian collusion – MyAJC
Obama-era uranium deal yields new questions, new accusations and new investigation – WKBW-TV
BBC sparks outrage inviting former Trump aide Sebastian Gorka on Radio 4’s Today programme – The Independent
her purple eye sockets and swollen lips throbbing. It had been two days since she woke up to her ex-boyfriend … – WIRED
Addressing Russian Influence: What Can We Learn From U.S. Cold War Counter-Propaganda Efforts?
The Clinton camp and DNC funded what became the Trump-Russia dossier: Here’s what it means – Washington Post
#TrumpDossier: It’s Not a ‘Bombshell’ You Moronic Hypocrites – IR.net
Anthony Weiner Will Do Prison Time In Massachusetts – Forward
Trump Was Showered With Russian Flags by a Protester Shouting ‘Treason,’ Video Shows – Newsweek
‘Trump Is Treason!’: Protester Throws Russian Flags At President
Launch probes! Congressional GOPers try desperately to take focus off Trump – CNN
GOP opens investigation into Obama Justice Department – The Mercury News
Putin at Valdai: A Deep Dive Into Long-Standing Grievances – EurasiaNet
Today’s Headlines and Commentary
Michael Bloomberg: Brexit is stupidest thing any country has done besides Trump
Protester Throws Russian Flags At Trump As He Arrives For Capitol Hill Tax Lunch – NPR

 

1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites)
trump russian ties – Google News: 51% Say Lawbreaking Likely in Clinton Dealings With Russia – Rasmussen Reports
 

51% Say Lawbreaking Likely in Clinton Dealings With Russia
Rasmussen Reports
Fifty-two percent (52%) of voters said in April that Bill and Hillary Clinton’s private dealings with Russian officials should be included in the FBI and congressional investigations of the Trump campaign’s alleged Russia ties. (Want a free daily e  

trump russian ties – Google News

Donald Trump: Donald Trump Throws U.S. Generals Under The Bus In Regard To Niger Attack

And that’s not presidential, experts say.

Donald Trump

trump under federal investigation – Google News: Trump has spent $1.75 million on White House redecorations – The Hill (blog)
 

Trump has spent $1.75 million on White House redecorations
The Hill (blog)
The Trump administration has reportedly spent $1.75 million on new furniture, repairs and decorations for the White House. Most of that sum has been for executive office furniture, including a $240,000 contract for wood office furniture, according to … 

trump under federal investigation – Google News

Russian Intelligence services – Google News: Catalonia Latest Target in Russian Active Measures Campaign – Government Accountability Project (blog)
 

Catalonia Latest Target in Russian Active Measures Campaign
Government Accountability Project (blog)
While Russia didn’t articulate an official position on the vote, deeming it an internal matter, it is clear its intelligence serviceswere using (and continue to use) sophisticated active measures in support of breakaway Catalonia to sow chaos and  

Russian Intelligence services – Google News

russia helping trump – Google News: Pretty disturbing. Senator slams Trump for ignoring law requiring Russia sanctions – Shareblue Media
 


Shareblue Media
Pretty disturbing. Senator slams Trump for ignoring law requiring Russia sanctions
Shareblue Media
It is a known fact, confirmed again and again by the entire intelligence community, that Russia interfered in the 2016 election, with the explicit purpose of helping Trump win. Trump still refuses to acknowledge this fact, dismissing it as a hoax and a and more »

russia helping trump – Google News

putin won US 2016 election – Google News: How ‘Putin’s Revenge’ became Trump’s victory – Yahoo News Canada (blog)
 


Yahoo News Canada (blog)
How ‘Putin’s Revenge’ became Trump’s victory
Yahoo News Canada (blog)
Frontline demonstrates, with a clear, easy-to-follow timeline, how Putin and his minions resolved to gain the revenge of the show’s title by directing hackers and other disruptors to increase the already-existing confusion, doubt, and fear in the 

putin won US 2016 election – Google News

crime and terror – Google News: It’s time for the ATF to refocus its mission – FederalNewsRadio.com
 


FederalNewsRadio.com
It’s time for the ATF to refocus its mission
FederalNewsRadio.com
And, while Congress is at it, perhaps thought should be given to returning ATF to Treasury where its crime fighting expertise and production of revenue will be appreciated and reap rewards in the fight against organized crime and terrorism. John A.and more »

crime and terror – Google News

Trump Investigations Report: 10:06 AM 10/26/2017 Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split

10:06 AM 10/26/2017 – Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split republican party pro-trump vs anti-trump split – Google Search Thursday October 26th, 2017 at 10:00 AM Republican Party Pro-Trump Vs Anti-Trump Split – Google News 1 Share 2 Breitbart alumni just abandoned the most Pro-Trump candidate of … Vox–Oct 23, 2017 Kelli Ward, the Republican primary challenger to Sen. … Continue reading“10:06 AM 10/26/2017 – Republican party pro-Trump vs anti-Trump split”Trump Investigations Report
Donald Trump: Anna Wintour Reveals She Wouldn’t Invite Donald Trump To The Met Gala Again

Tweetstorm coming in 3… 2…1.

Donald Trump

Comey – Google News: Howard University Activists Say School is Banning Them From James Comey Lecture – News One
 


News One
Howard University Activists Say School is Banning Them From James Comey Lecture
News One
Howard University administration has done everything in its power to exclude students from an upcoming lecture series with former FBI Director James Comey on race and lawenforcment, alleged a campus activist group recently. Comey will lead a series …
White House: Justice Department should ‘look at’ prosecuting ComeySTLtoday.com
Trey Gowdy targeting James Comey in new Clinton probeWashington Examiner
Gowdy, Goodlatte announce investigation into DOJ’s handling of Clinton emailsCBS News
Wall Street Journal –The Mercury News
all 81 news articles »

Comey – Google News

Donald Trump: Top Democrat Rips Trump’s ‘Dangerous’ Pick To Lead NASA

Jim Bridenstine doesn’t even believe in climate science, which “should disqualify him” for the job, says Sen. Patty Murray.

Donald Trump

trump as samson – Google News: ‘Witch’s Court’ Continues To Trump ‘Temperature of Love’ In Rating’s Race – Korea Portal (English Edition)
 


Korea Portal (English Edition)
‘Witch’s Court’ Continues To Trump ‘Temperature of Love’ In Rating’s Race
Korea Portal (English Edition)
“Witch’s Court” continues to dominate the late night. For a few weeks now, the legal drama on KBS has not only surpassed but has overtaken and left its competitor, “Temperature of Love,” in the dust. Two really different new dramas have been in a  

trump as samson – Google News

Elections 2016 Investigation – Google News: As Panel Questions Trump Associates, GOP Launches New Probes – In Homeland Security (blog)
 


CNN
As Panel Questions Trump Associates, GOP Launches New Probes
In Homeland Security (blog)
The Judiciary and Oversight panels have declined to investigate Russia’s interference in the 2016 elections, leaving those probes to Senate committees and the House intelligence committee. Special Counsel Robert Mueller also is investigatingRussia’s …
Courting Democratic Ire, Republicans Open New Obama-Era InquiriesNew York Timesall 97 news articles »

Elections 2016 Investigation – Google News

Trump Investigations Report: 9:49 AM 10/26/2017 More than 2 months after declaring an opioid crisis, Trump appears to have decided how to proceed Mic

More than 2 months after declaring an opioid crisis, Trump appears to have decided how to proceed Thursday October 26th, 2017 at 9:52 AM 1 Share Welcome to Mics daily read on Donald Trumps America. Want to receive this as a daily email in your inbox? Subscribe here. Every day, we bring you a different dispatch on Trumps … Continue reading“9:49 AM 10/26/2017 – More than 2 months after declaring an opioid crisis, Trump appears to have decided how to proceed – Mic”Trump Investigations Report
Donald Trump: Jimmy Kimmel Cuts Donald Trump’s ‘Standing Ovations’ Down To Size

“If only his mother had hugged him just one time.”

Donald Trump

Donald Trump | The Guardian: Trump to declare health emergency over opioids but no new funds to help

The presidents announcement of an emergency over the opioid epidemic may be more symbolic, with no plan to assign money for states proposed measuresDonald Trump is to order his health secretary to declare a public health emergency in response to the USs escalating opioid epidemic. But while the announcement that the president intends to mobilise his entire administration to combat the crisis will be seen as an important symbolic moment, there will be no new funds to deal with an epidemic claiming 100 lives or more a day.

Related: America’s opioid crisis: how prescription drugs sparked a national trauma

Almost 100 people are dying every day across America from opioid overdoses more than car crashes and shootings combined. The majority of these fatalities reveal widespread addiction to powerful prescription painkillers. The crisis unfolded in the mid-90s when the US pharmaceutical industry began marketing legal narcotics, particularly OxyContin, to treat everyday pain. This slow-release opioid was vigorously promoted to doctors and, amid lax regulation and slick sales tactics, people were assured it was safe. But the drug was akin to luxury morphine, doled out like super aspirin, and highly addictive. What resulted was a commercial triumph and a public health tragedy. Belated efforts to rein in distribution fueled a resurgence of heroin and the emergence of a deadly, black market version of the synthetic opioid fentanyl. The crisis is so deep because it affects all races, regions and incomes

Related: This is what the opioid epidemic feels like: ‘My son didn’t have to die’

Continue reading…

Donald Trump | The Guardian

trump under federal investigation – Google News: White House: Trump to declare opioid crisis a public health emergency – The Hill
 


The Hill
White House: Trump to declare opioid crisis a public health emergency
The Hill
The announcement has been months in the making and avoids declaring a more sweeping national emergency under the Stafford Act, which was one option the administration’s opioid commission had previously recommended. The commission recommended either a and more »

trump under federal investigation – Google News

trump and republican party – Google News: Trump: ‘We Have Great Unity In The Republican Party’ – CBS Minnesota / WCCO
 


CBS Minnesota / WCCO
Trump: ‘We Have Great Unity In The Republican Party’
CBS Minnesota / WCCO
Trump: ‘We Have Great Unity In The Republican Party‘. For days, Trump has been sparring with U.S. Senate Republicans Jeff Flake and Bob Corker. Both have criticized his leadership and behavior, Nikki Battiste reports (). WCCO This Morning – October 26, …

and more »

trump and republican party – Google News

Trump anxiety – Google News: Trump solidifies his grip on GOP with the exits of Flake, Corker – AZCentral.com
 


AZCentral.com
Trump solidifies his grip on GOP with the exits of Flake, Corker
AZCentral.com
“What does the ‘Trump Party’ mean other than doing what Trump wants to do? It’s a follow-the-leader kind of thing.” Larry Sabato, the political scientist who directs the University of Virginia’s Center for Politics, said the result is widespread 
Corker: My Foreign Relations Committee Will Keep Standing Up To TrumpTPM
Trump’s noisy tweets haven’t derailed tax reformWashington Postall 4,102 news articles »

Trump anxiety – Google News

Putin and the Russian Mafia – Google News: Ignatius: Russia’s worrisome push to rewrite cyberspace rules – The Daily Herald
 


Business Recorder
Ignatius: Russia’s worrisome push to rewrite cyberspace rules
The Daily Herald
Russia’s bid to rewrite global rules through the U.N. was matched by a personal pitch on cybercooperation in July from President Vladimir Putin to President Trump at the G-20 summit in Hamburg. Putin vehemently denied to Trump that Russiahad 
David Ignatius: Russia’s worrisome push to control cyberspaceWinston-Salem Journalall 109 news articles »

Putin and the Russian Mafia – Google News

trump russian candidate – Google News: Rep. Schiff On Trump Dossier: Sometimes Opposition Research Is True – RealClearPolitics
 


RealClearPolitics
Rep. Schiff On Trump Dossier: Sometimes Opposition Research Is True
RealClearPolitics
Here the Republicans are less interested in what did Russia do and how did they do it and how do we protect ourselves? But rather, let’s shift the focus on to any kind of government misbehavior, and maybe if we can suggest that the whole investigationand more »

trump russian candidate – Google News

 

Saved Stories – 1. Trump
The Early Edition: October 26, 2017
 

Before the start of business, Just Security provides a curated summary of up-to-the-minute developments at home and abroad. Heres todays news.

TRUMP-RUSSIA

The WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was approached by chief executive Alexander Nix of the data firm Cambridge Analytica, which carried out work for the Trump campaign during the 2016 election, Assange said yesterday, saying that he could confirm that he rejected the request from Cambridge Analytica for help. Nicholas Confessore reports at the New York Times.

Nix asked Assange about Hillary Clintons 33,000 missing emails and help to release them, according to sources familiar with the congressional investigations into alleged Trump-Russia connections, Betsy Woodruff reports at The Daily Beast.

The Democratic National Committee (D.N.C.) were unaware that the national party helped to fund the salacious dossier compiled by former British Intelligence officer Christopher Steele which alleged connections between the Trump campaign and Russia, current and past leaders of the D.N.C. have said, following revelations this week that the Clinton campaign and the D.N.C. partly funded the research. Jonathan Easley reports at the Hill.

A U.S. District Court judge has given the opposition research firm Fusion GPS until today to answer a subpoena issued by the House Intelligence Committee earlier this month. Fusion GPS hired Steele to compile the dossier and Republicans in the committee have been seeking information about the firms bank records, Mark Hosenball reports at Reuters.

Documents from Hillary Clintons 2016 presidential campaign are expected to be received by the Senate Intelligence committee next week, according to two sources familiar with the matter. The documents could provide greater detail about the Democrats response to Russias interference campaign and the Democrats role in funding for the Steele dossier, Ali Watkins reports at POLITICO.

The Senate Judiciary Committee has fractured into competing agendas, with Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) focusing on the Obama-era uranium deal with Russia and Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) drafting legislation on foreign influence in U.S. elections. Elana Schor and Kyle Cheney report at POLITICO.

It was legal to publish apparently hacked emails from the D.N.C., lawyers from Trumps presidential campaign argued in a court filing yesterday, saying that WikiLeaks qualifies as an online service immune from legal liability. Josh Gerstein reports at POLITICO.

The key points explaining the background of the dossier and the implications of the latest revelations about funding are set out by Kenneth P. Vogel at the New York Times.

There should be a full investigation following the revelation that the Democrats partly funded the salacious dossier alleging links between the Trump campaign and Russia, congressional investigators should focus on the role of the D.N.C., the Clinton campaign, and the possible role played by the F.B.I., and it would be wise for Mueller to resign from his role. The Wall Street Journal editorial board writes.

The F.B.I. has been so thoroughly implicated in the Russia meddling story and calls for special counsel Robert Mueller to recuse himself from the Russia investigation are not just fanciful partisan grandstanding, Holman W. Jenkins Jr. writes at the Wall Street Journal setting out the connections between the dossier, the Obama administration, the F.B.I. investigation into the Trump campaign, Mueller, the Obama-era deal to expand U.S.-Russia nuclear business, the Clinton Foundation, and the F.B.I.s role in the nuclear business deal.

NORTH KOREA

The U.S. should take literally North Koreas threat to test a nuclear weapon above ground, a senior North Korean official warned in an interview yesterday, adding that Pyongyang has always brought its words into action. Will Ripley reports at CNN.

China is helping us and maybe Russias going through the other way and hurting what were getting, President Trump said in an interview with Fox Business Network yesterday, stating that Russia has undermined efforts to rein in North Korea and that the threat posed by the regime could be more easily resolved if the U.S. had a better relationship with Russia. Reuters reports.

I solve problems, Trump also said in the interview, lamenting the fact that the North Korea problem had not been resolved earlier, but saying that he would deal with the crisis. Olivia Beavers reports at the Hill.

Well, Id rather not say, but youll be surprised, Trump said yesterday in response to a question whether he would visit the Demilitarized Zone (D.M.Z.) between North and South Korea during his 12-day tour of Asia at the beginning of next month. Jordan Fabian reports at the Hill.

The leader of South Koreas conservative opposition party has called on the Trump administration to reintroduce tactical nuclear weapons to South Korea in the face of the threat posed by Pyongyang, the possibility of this option was also raised by South Koreas Defense Minister Song Young-moo during a meeting with Defense Secretary Jim Mattis last month. Felicia Schwartz reports at the Wall Street Journal.

North Koreas extensive re-education camps have been revealed by satellite images and a report by the U.S.-based Committee for Human Rights in North Korea due to be released today. Anna Fifield reports at the Washington Post.

IRAQ

The U.S. and Iran should not bring their trouble inside Iraq, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi urged yesterday, saying that he would like to work with both countries, that U.S. forces should remain in Iraq after recapturing the last of the territory in the hands of the Islamic State group, and that Iranian-backed militias would be disbanded if they did not come under the control of the Baghdad government. Yaroslav Trofimov reports at the Wall Street Journal.

We wont accept anything but its cancellation and the respect of the Constitution, Abadi said in a statement today, saying that the Kurdistan regions offer to freeze the result of the controversial Iraqi Kurdistan independence referendum held last month was not enough to open negotiations. Reutersreports.

Iraqi federal forces and Iranian-backed Iraqi militia attacked Peshmerga positions in Nineveh province, the Kurdistan Region Security Council (K.R.S.C.) said today, also calling on the Baghdad government to accept the offers for unconditional talks and adding that the U.S. should stop Iraqs reckless behavior. Reuters reporting.

The clashes between Iraqi federal forces and Kurdish Peshmerga have impeded the movement of coalition military equipment inside Iraq and Syria, thereby undermining the campaign against the Islamic State group, the spokesperson for the U.S.-led coalition Col. Ryan Dillon said today. The APreports.

The U.S. has sought to defuse tension between the Iraqi government and the Iraqi Kurds, the two U.S. allies have been involved in clashes since last months Iraqi Kurdistan independence referendum, the Iraqi Kurds yesterday offered to suspend the results of the referendum which returned an overwhelming vote in favor of independence, however this has fallen short of Baghdads demand that the result be annulled. Isabel Coles, Ali A. Nabhan and Yaroslav Trofimov report at the Wall Street Journal.

Abadi is set to meet with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani today in Tehran for talks on regional security, Ted Regencia reports at Al Jazeera.

Abadis approach to the Kurdistan independence referendum has won praise from even his traditional critics, and his increased popularity as a consequence of his decisive actions have seemingly cemented his reelection next year, however difficulties remain. Tamer El-Ghobashy and Mustafa Salim observe at the Washington Post.

Abadi has managed to keep Iraq unified despite the predictions of an inevitable breakup, taking a tough stance against the Iraqi Kurdistan has seemingly paid off and Abadi is in a stronger position to lead the country out of the shadow of war and work with regional powers. Ishaan Tharoor provides an analysis at the Washington Post.

NIGER

My generals and my military had authorization over the U.S. mission in Niger, Trump said yesterday when asked whether he authorized the mission, making the comments after the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph Dunford said earlier this week that the U.S. special forces members were on a reconnaissance mission. Rebecca Kheel reports at the Hill.

The confused information amid the Niger ambush on Oct. 4 led the White House to believe that several U.S. soldiers might have been missing, the White House did not receive information that three bodies had been recovered and one soldier remained missing until at least eight hours after the attack began, according to an official familiar with the matter. Greg Jaffe and Karen DeYoung report at the Washington Post.

The Trump administration has been putting in motion plans to allow lethal drone strikes in Niger, according to U.S. officials, and the plan had been under consideration long before the deadly Oct. 4 attack. Ken Dilanian, Courtney Kube, William M. Arkin and Hans Nichols report at NBC News.

IRAN

Israel would act militarily by itself if international efforts led by Trump do not help stop Iran attaining nuclear capabilities, Israels Intelligence Minister Israel Katz said today. Tim Kelly and Nobuhiro Kubo reporting at Reuters.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has embarked on efforts to increase financial pressure on Iran and target the financing of terror in the Middle East, launching a new anti-terror finance center in Saudi Arabia yesterday. The efforts come following Trumps refusal to certify Irans compliance with the 2015 nuclear agreement last month, Ian Talley and Margherita Stancati report at the Wall Street Journal.   

The House of Representatives voted for new sanctions against the Iran-backed Lebanese Shiite Hezbollah militia group yesterday, today the House will vote on another bill calling for additional sanctions aimed at Irans ballistic missiles program. Al Jazeera reports.

A bipartisan plan for a tougher approach on Iran is being crafted by Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) along with his Democratic counterpart Ben Cardin (Md.), Corker said yesterday. Elana Schor reporting at POLITICO.

SYRIA

Pro-Syrian government forces have seized an oil pumping station in the eastern Deir al-Zour province, a Hezbollah-run news service reported today, the report saying that the position constitutes a launch pad for an offensive on what is believed to be the last remaining Islamic State stronghold in Syria. Reuters reports.

The outcome is not in doubt, the U.S. commander of the international campaign against the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq, Lt. Gen. Paul E. Funk II, said yesterday, saying that the militants were on the run and they cannot hold territory, but noting that the coalition would continue to pursue foreign Islamic State fighters before they can return to their home countries and there is a real problem that the virtual caliphate continues to recruit. David Zucchino reports at the New York Times.

The U.N. envoy for Syria Staffan de Mistura will meet with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in Geneva today, the AP reports.

U.S.-led airstrikes continue. U.S. and coalition forces carried out seven airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Syria on October 24. Separately, partner forces conducted three strikes against targets in Iraq. [Central Command]

RUSSIA

Top Senate Republicans have vowed to press the White House on delays to imposing new sanctions on Russia and whether this has been done intentionally, the legislation for the sanctions was passed three and a half weeks ago and were in response to Russias interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Kevin Liptak, Ted Barrett and Sara Murray report at CNN.

Democratic members of House Foreign Affairs Committee have also demanded answers from the Trump administration on delays to sanctions against Russia in a letter to the president yesterday. Andrew Desiderio reports at The Daily Beast.

Germanys President Frank-Walter Steinmeier met with Russian President Vladimir Putin yesterday to discuss key issues, such as Ukraine, Syria, economic ties, the Iran nuclear deal and the crisis on the Korean Peninsula. The AP reports.

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION FOREIGN POLICY

Trumps son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner is expected to take a low-profile role during Trumps visit to China next month, with some speculating that Kushners diminished position has been a consequence of chief of staff John Kellys efforts to standardize practice at the White House. Annie Karni and Andrew Restuccia report at POLITICO.

The relationship between the most senior U.S. officials at N.A.T.O. headquarters is described by David M. Herszenhorn at POLITICO Magazine.

The challenges facing the Trump administration did not start with Trump and the White House must grapple with the most challenging foreign-policy environment in modern history due to threat, organizational and cognitive complexities. Amy Zegart writes at The Atlantic.

Secretary of State Rex Tillersons visit to Pakistan this week shone a spotlight on the difficulty U.S.-Pakistan relationship, it is difficult to understand the U.S. position due to its inconsistent messages and Tillerson should not have lectured Pakistan without recognizing Pakistans legitimate security interests.  The DAWN.com editorial board writes.

Tillerson achieved a rare diplomatic victory by bringing Saudi Arabia and Iraq closer together last weekend, marking a potentially significant development between the two countries who have been traditional adversaries. Rhys Dubin writes at Foreign Policy.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

The House of Representatives held a series of hearings focused on the Trump administrations knowledge of Kaspersky Lab anti-virus software and Russias ability to access U.S. National Security Agency (N.S.A.) classified information through Kaspersky Lab products. Morgan Chalfant reports at the Hill.

The U.S. and Gulf Arab allies sanctioned eleven Yemeni individuals and entities suspected of financing the Islamic State group and al-Qaeda, the U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin praising the designation by Gulf Arab allies, the measure demonstrating a rare moment of coordination, especially amid the Gulf crisis which began on June 5. Aya Batrawy and Abdullah Al-Shihri report at the AP.

A former F.B.I. informant has been cleared to testify before Congress over the Obama-era nuclear business deal with Russia, a Justice Department spokesperson confirming that the informant would not be subject to a confidentiality agreement. John Solomon reports at the Hill.

The Senate Armed Services Committee has expressed confidence that it will finish work on the annual defense policy bill soon, the chairman of the committee John McCain (R-Ariz.) saying that it can be done in the next few days. Rebecca Kheel reports at the Hill.

I havent seen any hard evidence on the delivery of weapons from the Russians to the Taliban, the chairman of N.A.T.O.s military committee Gen. Petr Pavel told reporters yesterday, making the comments amid concern from Pentagon officials that Russia has been increasingly involved in the conflict in Afghanistan. Rebecca Kheel reports at the Hill.

The position of military generals at the top of the Trump administration carries risks and perhaps they are in over their heads. Mark Perry writes at POLITICO Magazine.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is expected to propose strategic dialogue between the leaders of the U.S., India and Australia to counter Chinas expansionism. Reuters reports.

Read on Just Security »

Trump crosses another line – Washington Post
 


Washington Post
Trump crosses another line
Washington Post
But it is nevertheless shocking to learn that Mr. Trump has breached tradition to personally interview two candidates for U.S. attorney both of whom would have the power to investigate him in the future. Politico and CNN report that Mr. Trump met  

As panel questions Trump associates, GOP launches new probes – STLtoday.com
 


STLtoday.com
As panel questions Trump associates, GOP launches new probes
STLtoday.com
The announcements of the investigations by three GOP committees were criticized by Democrats as a “massive diversion” from congressional probes into potential coordination between the Kremlin and associates of the Trump campaign and from two …
Dossier fight could be first legal test for Hill Russia probesPoliticoall 17 news articles »

Republicans Launch New Investigations Into Clinton Email Probe, Uranium Deal – NPR
 


NPR
Republicans Launch New Investigations Into Clinton Email Probe, Uranium Deal
NPR
For Trump, however, the case was made: “Remember that Hillary Clinton gave Russia 20 percent of American uranium and, you know, she was paid a fortune,” Trump said at a campaign rally last October. “You know, they got a tremendous amount of money.”.
Dossier fight could be first legal test for Hill Russia probes – POLITICOPolitico
Republicans on House’s Trump-Russia Probe Not That Interested in …Daily Beast
Trump’s lawyer meets with House investigatorsThe Hill
Courthouse News Service –Wall Street Journal
all 81 news articles »
Republican committees investigate Clinton and Obama – BBC News
 


BBC News
Republican committees investigate Clinton and Obama
BBC News
“This new investigation is a massive diversion to distract from the lack of Republican oversight of the Trump administration and the national security threat that Russia poses,” said Elijah Cummings and John Conyers in a statement. Mrs Clinton said in
Republicans open investigations into Clinton uranium deal and Obama DOJABC News
President Trump trades insults with the GOP leader of Senate Foreign Relations CommitteeLos Angeles Times
House GOP launches probes into Clinton, Obama controversiesPolitico
Washington Post –Press Herald –The Hill –The Hill
all 198 news articles »
Republicans look past Trump scandals, zero in on Hillary Clinton – MSNBC
 


MSNBC
Republicans look past Trump scandals, zero in on Hillary Clinton
MSNBC
House Republicans on Tuesday announced investigations into two of President Trump’s most frequent grievances, unveiling new inquiries into actions of the Obama administration connected to Hillary Clinton. In the first of two back-to-back announcements, …
Republican committees investigate Clinton and ObamaBBC News
Republicans open investigations into Clinton uranium deal and Obama DOJABC News
President Trump trades insults with the GOP leader of Senate Foreign Relations CommitteeLos Angeles Times
Politico –Washington Post –The Hill –The Hill
all 211 news articles »
Robert Mueller Tightens Paul Manafort’s Noose – Vanity Fair
 


Reuters
Robert Mueller Tightens Paul Manafort’s Noose
Vanity Fair
… noteworthy, as any charges born out of the investigations would be exempt from presidential pardonswhich only apply to federal crimesraising the possibility that they could be used as leverage against Manafort and, by extension, the Trumpcampaign.
Manhattan US attorney adds to probes of ex-Trump aide Manafort: reportsReuters
Paul Manafort faces new money laundering probe by US attorney’s office in NY: sourceABC Newsall 26 news articles »

Clinton campaign, DNC paid for research that led to Russia dossier … – Washington Post
 


Washington Post
Clinton campaign, DNC paid for research that led to Russia dossier …
Washington Post
The Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee helped fund research that resulted in a now-famous dossier containing allegations about …
Dossier fight could be first legal test for Hill Russia probesPolitico
Republicans on House’s Trump-Russia Probe Not That Interested in Trump or RussiaDaily Beastall 175 news articles »

The Senate Judiciary Committee’s Russia Probe Just Blew Up – Mother Jones
 


Mother Jones
The Senate Judiciary Committee’s Russia Probe Just Blew Up
Mother Jones
Judiciary’s Russia investigation is the latest congressional probe to stall out over GOP efforts to pursue matters Democrats see as gambits to distract or provide cover for the Trump administration. The partisan sparring within the committees looking  

Trump’s consistent refrain: There is not now and never will be proof of Russian collusion – MyAJC
 


MyAJC
Trump’s consistent refrain: There is not now and never will be proof of Russian collusion
MyAJC
In early October, Trump claimed that the Department of Justice had “fed information” to the Clinton campaign about theinvestigation into Clinton’s email server, which was “collusion and corruption of the highest order.” It was “one more reason” why he and more »

Obama-era uranium deal yields new questions, new accusations and new investigation – WKBW-TV
 


WKBW-TV
Obama-era uranium deal yields new questions, new accusations and new investigation
WKBW-TV
WASHINGTON, DC – JULY 25: House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, who previously had recused himself from the panel’s Russia investigation, arrives ahead of White House Senior Advisor and President Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared … New 
Embattled House Intel chair launches probe into US-Russia uranium deal implicating Hillary ClintonBusiness Insider
‘Baloney’: Hillary chokes on red-hot scandalWND.com
House opens probe into Russian Federation uranium dealІnsіdеr Cаr Nеwsall 228 news articles »

BBC sparks outrage inviting former Trump aide Sebastian Gorka on Radio 4’s Today programme – The Independent
 


The Independent
BBC sparks outrage inviting former Trump aide Sebastian Gorka on Radio 4’s Today programme
The Independent
The BBC has been heavily criticised for inviting one of Donald Trump’s most controversial former aides on to its flagship radio news programme. Sebastian Gorka appeared on BBC Radio 4’s Today to respond to the resignations of two Republican senators … 

her purple eye sockets and swollen lips throbbing. It had been two days since she woke up to her ex-boyfriend … – WIRED
 


WIRED
her purple eye sockets and swollen lips throbbing. It had been two days since she woke up to her ex-boyfriend…
WIRED
But Anna didn’t die. Instead, the then-28-year-old journalist peeled herself off of the couch, dripping blood as she hobbled to the bathroom. The next day, she phoned her editor, Katya. In the white-walled calmness of Katya’s apartment in Moscow’s Red … 

Addressing Russian Influence: What Can We Learn From U.S. Cold War Counter-Propaganda Efforts?

Microsoft and Google have joined Facebook in revealing that Russia may have purchased ads in an effort to manipulate the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Reactions to this news have been a mix of bewilderment and alarmbut perhaps we should not be so surprised. The fabricated news stories and click-bait headlines that dominated social media throughout the 2016 campaign are not a new tactic for the Russians. They are simply the latest iteration of a practice Moscow has used for nearly a century.This type of operation is known in the intelligence community as disinformation, an Anglicization of the Russian term dezinformatsiya. Disinformation has taken many forms across the decades, from funding communist newspapers to orchestrating the publication of news stories based on forged documents. During the Cold War these tactics were at the forefront of the Soviet Unions strategy to discredit and undermine the United States. In light of this history, it is perhaps useful to look at how the United States countered Soviet tactics and consider whether any U.S. countermeasures drawn from the past can be adapted to address the situation today.

 

The Soviets Historical Use of Propaganda

Early Soviet disinformation focused on softening Josef Stalins image in Europe and easing concerns that the USSR had expansionist ambitions. In the 1930s, Moscow orchestrated the dramatic escape of defectorsdiplomats such as Grigory Besedovsky, who very publicly escaped the Soviet embassy in Paris, and Sergei Dmitrievsky who did the same in Stockholm. Both initially spoke out against the USSR and later, after gaining credibility, began disseminating disinformation about the regime, portraying Stalin as tough but honest, pro-Western and strictly Russia-oriented.

After World War II, the Soviets shifted their focus to the United States. Two years after the surrender of Nazi Germany, in 1947, Soviet leadership created the Committee of Information to run undercover operations to influence public opinion. In the 1950s, a specialized intelligence unit was establishedspecifically to disseminate disinformation. In the 1970s, as disinformation became a larger part of the Soviet strategy, the unit was upgraded to a full service and placed under the command of a KGB general.

The Soviets created several avenues for disseminating disinformation. Moscow covertly fundedcommunist newspapers and radio stations around the world, particularly in Africa and Latin America, where they especially hoped to exert influence. They also funded communist parties in Western countries, and established frontssuch as the World Peace Council, World Federation of Free Trade Unions, and the World Federation of Democratic Youthto spread communist ideology.

One of the most popular methods of disseminating disinformation targeted legitimate news outlets. By anonymously sending forged documentssuch as embassy communications or military memorandato credible publications, the Soviets attempted to create well-timed fake news stories that the public accepted as true. Once the stories caught on, they were reprinted extensively in Soviet-controlled papers in the hopes that the story would be picked up by more mainstream sourcesand would gain credibility in the process.

Disinformation often highlighted unattractive aspects of American culture, exaggerating real problems and imagining non-existent ones. A particular object of disinformation campaigns was the very real systemic racism and discrimination in the United States. When the truth had the potential to be damaging enough on its own, the Soviets simply aimed to direct attention to the story. The arrest and trial of the African-American communist academic Angela Davis, for example, was widely publicized by Soviet outlets, particularly in Africa. Davis was accused of providing a handgun to militants, who then used the weapon in a courtroom shooting. The propaganda pieces about her trial described the proceedings as racially and ideologically driven, and they predicted an unjust outcome. Soviet efforts, at least in this instance, were ultimately undermined when Davis was acquitted by an all-white jury.

Stories from the emerging civil rights movement were distorted to create an exaggerated picture of the racial divide in the United States. Many Soviet citizens believed that lynchings were commonplace and legal, that broad swaths of American society accepted the KKK, and that most schools were segregated. More often, however, disinformation stories were simply pure fabrications. Following President Jimmy Carters boycott of the Moscow Summer Olympics in 1980, the KGB forged letters from the Ku Klux Klan that threatened athletes from African countries and mailed them from Washington, D.C., to the countries Olympic committees. Although none of the countries succumbed to this intimidation, the attorney general and FBI Director were forced to deny U.S. involvement and point the finger at Moscow.

Though fake news was a popular tool during the Cold War, it was much more effective in developing countries where journalistic standards were lower. In Latin America and Africa, forged documents tended not to be investigated thoroughly prior to publication, and, as a result, Soviet disinformation campaigns successfully soured public opinion of the United States. In the West, success was more elusive. Journalists were more careful; they were more likely to follow up on suspicious allegations and less likely to publish a story with a single, anonymous source of evidence.

A better-known disinformation campaign, the ominously named Operation INFEKTION, sought to exploit international fears of U.S. military expansion by sowing the narrative that AIDS had been created as the result of American biological weapons experimentation. The story, based on an anonymous letter from an American scientist, was initially published in a communist Indian newspaper, but at the time it was largely ignored. It was revived three years later, howeverthis time, in an East German paper and with the additional backing of a pseudoscientific report published in East Berlin. The story spread quickly, primarily through publication in Soviet and other communist or leftist papers around the globe, and entered the public discourse to the point that U.S. officials were forced to repeatedly address and refute the story. It only disappeared from headlines after the United States threatened to cut off scientific cooperation with the USSR in the field of AIDS research.

Other forgeries also tried to paint an unflattering picture of the United States, depicting a government eager to use assassination, coups, and election manipulation to achieve its ideological goals. A forged telegram attempted to link the killing of Afghan leader Hafizullah Amin to a CIA plot. A separate forged letter appeared to show American support for the conservatives in the 1981 Greek elections and plans for a coup if Socialist leader Andreas Papandreou won. Fake documents in 1983 seemed to show plans to overthrow the Ghanaian regime. A forged Presidential memorandum to the Departments of State and Defense and the CIA appeared to order those agencies to establish a U.S. military force called the Permanent Peace Forces that would be used to intervene in Latin Americathus inflaming nationalist and anti-American sentiment in the region.

The disinformation campaigns also attempted to portray the United States as an untrustworthy ally, though these campaigns were largely unsuccessful. A forged letter published in a left wing Belgian newspaper, for example, appeared to show retired NATO Commander Alexander Haig and NATO Secretary General Joseph Luns discussing a nuclear first strike and planning a sensitive operation to jolt the faint hearted in Europe. A separate forged letter from President Ronald Reagan to Spanish King Juan Carlos appeared to show the United States putting pressure on Spain to join NATO, while a forged speech purportedly for U.N. Ambassador Jeanne Kirkpatrick appeared to show U.S. support for the balkanization of India.

These campaigns also, somewhat ironically, attempted to demonstrate that the United States was engaging in disinformation campaigns of its own. Fake telegrams from the American Embassy in Rome purportedly showed plans to blame the 1981 attempted assassination of Pope John Paul II on the Soviets. Another attempt used a forged letter from a United States Information Agency (USIA) official to a senator, in which the official suggested the use of false statements and exaggerations about the Chernobyl disaster to damage perception of the Soviets, althoughunder this Soviet narrativethe plot was uncovered before the letter could circulate.

If all of this sounds eerily familiar, it should: The goals and tactics of Putins Russia are not far removed from the goals of Soviet era propagandists. Putins Moscow has continued the strategy of using disinformation to take advantage of and further sow civil discord in the United States, to undercut the United States directly and to undermine U.S. foreign relations.

The recent revelations from Silicon Valley giants FacebookGoogle, and Microsoftrevelations that Russia likely spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on politically targeted advertising that spread disinformationillustrate how Moscow is pursuing long-standing foreign policy goals while adapting to changing technology. The political ads appeared to address both sides of the U.S. political divide, reaching millions of Americans. The goal of these ads appears to be the widening of domestic divisions and amplification of existing fears. Some Facebook ads, for example, supported the Black Lives Matter movement, while others aimed to paint the organization as a danger to society. Some ads appeared to highlight support for then-candidate Hillary Clinton, while others attempted to alarm potential voters by showing her popularity with Muslim women. In a number of cases, the ads were targeted directly at key demographics in Wisconsin and Michigan.

Russia still uses its own overt propaganda machine to spread disinformation, particularly through the television station Russia Today and the news agency Sputnik. These outlets disseminate misleading and fabricated information about the United States and NATO members, often relating to those actors foreign policy objectives and military operations. Sputnik and Russia Today, for example, reported on a fire at a NATO base in Izmir, Turkey, alleging that the fire was the result of intentional sabotage after the failed Turkish coup. Although there had been a fire, it was blazing some distance away in a nearby forest and did not appear to have been the result of arson. Stories like these are often not intended to influence American voters, but instead to affect Russian citizens and sympathetic foreign nationals by fostering the perception of the United States as a war mongering, expansionist nation.

 

U.S. Counter-Propaganda Efforts

During the Cold War, the United States utilized a range of strategies to push back against Soviet active measures. These can be categorized in three groups: First, the United States centralized its response and coordinated a strategy in order to utilize the power of its example; second, it responded directly to Soviet efforts, cultivating thought leaders around the world and spreading American narratives globallyover a variety of mediums; and third, the United States acted to inform the public and embarrass Soviet officials by calling out Soviet propaganda while strengthening allies, media outlets and public officials in a position to prevent the spread communist propaganda.

Efforts like the Marshall Plan, the space race, the civil rights movement, and international development efforts all can be viewed as attempts to respond through the power of example. The United States also responded directly to Soviet efforts, empowering the CIA to cultivate and develop foreign thought leaders while creating the United States Information Agency (USIA) and authorizing it to push an American narrative to the world. Later, after these efforts dwindled, the Reagan administration would create the Active Measures Working Group (AMWG)perhaps the most successful counter-propaganda effort of the entire Cold War.

Sensing that it was losing the battle for the European intelligentsia, in 1953, President Eisenhower established the United States Information Agency (USIA), which became the chosen instrument for ideological operations during the Cold War. At its height, the USIA had the most extensive overseas presence of any Washington agency. USIAs activities included publishing magazines, pamphlets, leaflets and establishing a global library network. In the Soviet Union, the U.S. Embassy distributedcopies of magazines and books to officials and other prominent people. One such official was none other than a young party-secretary named Mikhail Gorbachev.

Perhaps most importantly, USIA produced Voice of Americaa network broadcast heard by over 100 million people and in over forty languages during the Cold War. It is hard to judge how effective programs like Voice of America were in changing public opinion, but Soviet officials disliked them enough to invest significant resources into building a vast network of jammers that emitted noise on frequencies used by Western broadcasters. The jamming program was massive, and its total power was estimated to be three times that of all Western radios combined. In the face of such resistance, however, Western programmers simply targeted smaller cities and rural areas where jammers were less concentrated. Through underground networks, Soviet dissidents made copies of broadcasts, distributing them throughout the country.

USIA programs were only one part of official efforts to influence the rest of the world, however. Other federal bureaucraciesin particular the Department of Defense and the CIAmatched, and often surpassed, the USIAs operations.

In Europe, military intelligence planners stockpiled large polyethylene balloons full of propaganda notes. The balloons would then rise 30,000-40,000 feet, follow the prevailing wind, and break open at predetermined coordinates, scattering leaflets across the land below. This operation lasted from October 1951 until November 1956, and for its duration, the skies of Central Europe were littered with more than 350,000 balloons carrying over 300,000,000 leaflets, posters, books and other printed matter.

Beginning in 1950, the CIA covertly established and funded the Congress for Cultural Freedom. At its peak, the Congress had offices in 35 countries, employed dozens of personnel, published over twenty prestige magazines, held art exhibitions, owned a news and features service, organized high-profile international conferences, and rewarded musicians and artists with prizes and public performances. Its mission was to nudge the intelligentsia of Western Europe away from its lingering fascination with Marxism and communism towards a view more accommodating of the American way.

The United States engaged in less idealistic measures as well. The Operations Coordinating Board, an ideological warfare planning team within the National Security Council, was tasked with creating integrated country plans to manage communism. These plans generally followed the standard lines of containment: for example, plotting and executing an intervention in Philippine elections to ensure a pro-Western result and facilitating anti-communist activity by trade unions in order to destabilize the government of Arbenz Guzman in Guatemala. The CIA also used U.S. corporations to funnel money to non-communist political parties and trade unions. Private publications, such as The International Herald-Tribune received money to reprint pro-U.S. news.

 

The Active Measures Working Group

U.S. attempts to counter Soviet disinformation eventually fell out of favor in Washington and had virtually disappeared by the late 1970s. Yet in 1981, with the election of Ronald Reagan, the United States re-energized its efforts, creating the Active Measures Working Group (AMWG). AMWG was an interagency committee chaired by the Department of State and included representatives of the CIA, USIA, the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, and the Departments of Defense and Justice. Operating under its methodology of Report-Analyze-Publicize (RAP), AMWG officials monitoredSoviet disinformation campaigns, issued regularly updated reports, talked to Western press, personally called editors of newspapers that ran Soviet-sponsored disinformation stories, and occasionally confronted Soviet officials directly about particular active measures.

By limiting the scope of its activities to countering Soviet influence operations that could be exposed in a compelling way, the AMWG was able to significantly undermine the effectiveness of Soviet disinformation campaigns. The group published its first report, State Department Special Report 88 in October 1981. The document was simple, containing a four-page overview of Soviet disinformation techniques and themes. Yet over 14,000 copies of the report were distributed to news organizations, federal agencies and allies. Six years later, the document would find its hands into none other than Mikhail Gorbachev, who waved a copy at then-Secretary of State George Shultz, complaining that the information was damaging the Soviet Unions reputation. Simply exposing Soviet acts of disinformation proved an extremely powerful tool.

 

Lessons from U.S. Counter-Propaganda Efforts

The current Russian strategy of active measures, of which disinformation is one part, appears largely the same as that utilized during the Soviet period. However, significant changes in the media landscape have made those active measures more effective in todays United States. From the late 1940s until the fall of the Berlin Wall, Soviet agents had difficulty utilizing active measures against Western countries; well-trained journalists and editors were generally suspicious of too-good-to-be-true claims and they thoroughly vetted stories before publication. Those outlets where the Soviets found success in placing disinformation tended to be outlets that were discredited by their very nature: party magazines, tabloids, or well-known pro-communist publications with small readerships. Writing in 1983 for the U.S. Army War Colleges journal, Ambassador Dennis Kux, former director of the Active Measures Working Group, noted:

Disinformation appears to fare poorly in Western Democracies with their free press. With a few exceptions, disinformation has largely surfaced either in sensationalist or pro-communist journals, where it has little impact on public opinion. Responsible journalists and journals check out suspicious sounding allegations or anonymous documents. They do not generally publish stories lacking evidence and sourcing.

Today, the media landscape is vastly different: No longer do major media outlets dominate limited information streams. Reflecting the broader disintermediation of American society, technology has given rise to many more media organizations and information platforms, not all of which share the same editorial standards or capacity as top publications. Moreover, websites can be created cheaply and easily, and each one carries with it the potential to reach vast audiences, based not on long-term credibility and accuracy, but instead on displaying the right headline and click-bait story at the right time. Whereas Soviet agents would plant disinformation in Indian or Nigerian media and wait for it to bubble up to major outlets, Russian propagandists today have to worry less about getting disinformation past pesky editors and can instead inject it directly into the mainstream of democratic discourse.

Even so, there may be lessons that the United States can learn from its Cold War competition with the Soviets, particularly from the later success of the AMWG.

To do so, it is important to distinguish between two related, but analytically distinct, Russian active measure tactics. The first involves the hacking of governmental and private computer systems and selectively leaking sensitive information in order to create a desired misperception of reality. A second tactic consists of deliberate distortion, outright manipulation and active lying in order to create a false understanding of the world.

We have noted throughout this piece that the strategy associated with active measures and disinformation is substantially the same as before, but that because of changes in media technology and Russian tactics, it now seems to be more successful in the United States. We posit that this is because until very recently, free speech had a set of natural regulators. Producing a widely read newspaper or a well-watched television show was capital intensive. Moreover, top publications with large readerships had sophisticated editors who viewed it as their ethical responsibility to separate fact from fiction. This ethical responsibility was supported further by a professional duty to ensure that the paper maintained its credibility with its audience. After all, that long-term credibility was a business asset. Today, that appears to no longer be true, especially as Facebook impression algorithms distort economic incentives.

The question then is how to replicate those regulatorsthe guardians of the marketplace of ideasin a rapidly disintermediating society.

The first step may simply be to create a new AMWG-like working group tasked with tackling Russian disinformation directly, publicly and deliberately. This group could coordinate policy and platform solutions with major technology companies, review and propose legislative solutions, and empower, strengthen and educate the press, diplomatic officials and the public at large in order to combat Russian active measures.

Transparency is key. The AMWG found success when it took the time to publicize what Soviet propagandists were doing and why. According to Dennis Kux, [t]he best means of rendering the ground less fertile is to ensure that people . . . are fully aware of attempts to deceive them. An interagency group that focuses on credibly highlighting Russian activity could potentially replicate that success. At the moment, some non-governmental groups have taken on this project. For example, the German Marshall Fund recently launched Hamilton 68. a project led by Clint Watts, J.M. Berger, Andrew Weisburd and Jonathon Morgan that seeks to expose the effects of Russian online influence networks in real time and to inform the public of themes and content being promoted to Americans by foreign powers. A new AMWG could launch similar efforts or help insure that non-governmental efforts are adequately funded.

This work may seem duplicative at a moment when both special counsel and congressional committees are actively investigating Russian activity. But that interest will not prove sustainable over the long term: Mueller will end his investigation and Congress will move on at some point. High-profile institutional actors cannot sustain intense focus on a single issue forever. Russia, by contrast, will remain a persistent threat. Reestablishing a lean interagency committee to coordinate counter-narratives and responses to Russian active measures has value. That work, in fact, could not be more important.

Throughout its tenure, the original AMWG repeatedly noted that Russian propaganda rarely had a substantial impact inside the United States because credible media outlets usually weeded out fake stories and false headlines, preempting them from reaching large audiences. Today, the flow of information no longer appears to permit the United States such refuge. As part of its work, then, this new AMWG should coordinate with technology companies to find solutions that effectively disrupt Russian activities.

But tech companies need not wait for the creation of such a group. Leading social media platforms and major news outlets should start by providing a forthright account to the American people about what has happened and what they see happening today. They could also begin by implementing the most apparent solutions, two of which we outline below.

One solution is that journalists should adopt a norm against publishing hacked material until they are able to fully contextualize and verify it. This was precisely the approach that major news outlets in France took in early 2017 when, just a few hours before the end of the French presidential campaign, thousands of internal documents attributed to Emmanuel Macrons campaign were published on the internet. Le Monde, in explaining its decision not to publish the leaked material, noted these files were published 48 hours before the vote, with the clear goal of harming the validity of the ballot. American outlets should adopt a similar norm. Many leaks have not been used to inform public discussion, but are instead a form of weaponized organization doxxing. And the New York Times and Washington Post have been more than content at times to parrot Wikileaks content without reflection in a race to publish.

Skeptics will assert that this will not solve the problem. Even if major U.S. outlets choose not to publish hacked material, foreign outlets, with no allegiance to the security or integrity of the United States, may choose to publish them online. Once on the internet and in English, they can easily ricochet around the internet with abandon. And of course, blogs, social media pages and other non-traditional media can easily pick up stories neglected by major outlets. Many of these concerns have merit.

Yet even so, there is reason to believe that a strategy of self-policing by major outlets could depress the success of Russian active measures. Most Americans continue to receive the majority of their news from established news outlets. According to Pew, only four in ten Americans regularly get their news online. Further, of those that do consume news online, roughly twice as many people receive their news from major news organizations than from social media. In this way, major media outlets can and should still play a regulating effect.

Online platforms also have a role to play in regulation. Already, some are stepping up. For example, Google has reconfigured search algorithms in an attempt to prevent conspiracy sites from populating search functions. Similarly, YouTube determined that flagged videos that contain controversial … content will be put in a limited state where they cannot be suggested to other users, recommended, monetized, or given comments or likes. And Facebook itself has taken steps to tamp down the amount of disinformation on its platform, first by allowing users to flag purportedly fake news and second by providing users with additional information about publishers and related articles with a new I buttonon news feed links.

Paradoxically, these outlets should no longer be paralyzed by concerns of censorship. Free speech has always relied on credible regulators to inform the public and prevent the marketplace of ideas from collapsing into a cacophony of chaos, misinformation, and manipulation. Today, those regulators are no longer experienced editors or producers but must instead be the platform managers and users of online social media. In this way, we may even view this type of free speech regulation as more democratized.

 

Conclusion

The potential solutions we outline above are likely only the start of a conversation regarding what is required to push back against Russian active measures. Throughout the struggle for supremacy during the Cold War, the United States actively battled Soviet active measures and disinformation campaigns designed to discredit the United States abroad and undermine social cohesion at home. In recent years, Russia has renewed that fight, and while many factors have changedsome of which favor Russian efforts more than American responsesthere is still a great deal that the United States can learn, both positive and negative, from its experience. The fight then was iterative and often experimental, and that dynamism and flexibility will likely be necessary today.

The Clinton camp and DNC funded what became the Trump-Russia dossier: Here’s what it means – Washington Post
 


Washington Post
The Clinton camp and DNC funded what became the Trump-Russia dossier: Here’s what it means
Washington Post
The Washington Post broke the story Tuesday night that the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee helped pay for that now-famous dossier of research on President Trump. The Post’s Adam Entous, Devlin Barrett and Rosalind S.
Clinton Campaign and Democratic Party Helped Pay for Russia Trump DossierNew York Times
Trump-Russia dossier research was originally funded by the Clinton campaign and the DNCCNBC
The Trump dossier was Clinton’s dirtiest political trickNew York Post
Fox News –NBCNews.com –CBS News
all 138 news articles »
#TrumpDossier: It’s Not a ‘Bombshell’ You Moronic Hypocrites – IR.net
 


IR.net
#TrumpDossier: It’s Not a ‘Bombshell’ You Moronic Hypocrites
IR.net
Ok, so maybe I got a little bit carried away with the title of this piece, but as I watched conservative news last night, I counted at least seven times that I puked a little bit in my mouth. As the largest investigation into a sitting President, that 
Revealed: How Hillary paid for notorious ‘golden showers’ dossier on Trump: Her campaign lawyer funded dirty tricks …Daily Mail
Hillary Clinton’s campaign ‘paid for’ notorious Donald Trump dossierNew Zealand Heraldall 138 news articles »

Anthony Weiner Will Do Prison Time In Massachusetts – Forward
 

Anthony Weiner Will Do Prison Time In Massachusetts
Forward
Anthony Weiner will reportedly be spending his prison time for sexting minors at a federal medical center in Massachusetts. The disgraced ex-congressman has been assigned to the Federal Medical Center, Devens, a federal medical center with an adjacent … 

Trump Was Showered With Russian Flags by a Protester Shouting ‘Treason,’ Video Shows – Newsweek
 


Newsweek
Trump Was Showered With Russian Flags by a Protester Shouting ‘Treason,’ Video Shows
Newsweek
The incident came as Trump deals with the investigation into his campaign’s alleged links to Russia, as well as the Trump administration blowing past a deadline to sanction Russians over meddling in last year’s election. Trump has repeatedly beenand more »

‘Trump Is Treason!’: Protester Throws Russian Flags At President

A liberal activist infiltrated a press area outside a Senate GOP lunch.
Launch probes! Congressional GOPers try desperately to take focus off Trump – CNN
 


CNN
Launch probes! Congressional GOPers try desperately to take focus off Trump
CNN
To be clear: House Republicans are totally within their rights to open these probes. Doing so is one of the luxuries of being in the majority in the House (and Senate). (Related: The ability to open these sorts of congressional investigations is why 
House GOP launches probes into Obama-era uranium deal, Clinton email inquiryWashington Post
House GOP opens probe into DOJ’s Clinton investigationPolitico 
Republicans open investigations into Clinton uranium deal and Obama DOJABC News
Los Angeles TimesUSA TODAY
 
House Republicans launch two new investigations tied to Hillary ClintonUSA TODAY
 News & Observer
 
all 161
 
ABC News
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GOP opens investigation into Obama Justice Department – The Mercury News
 


The Mercury News
GOP opens investigation into Obama Justice Department
The Mercury News
The lack of charges remains a lingering grievance for Trump, who for months has held it up as an example of a riggedcriminal justice system that shielded his Democratic opponent from punishment for her use of a private server for government business.
White House: Justice Department should ‘look at’ prosecuting ComeySTLtoday.com 
As Panel Questions Trump Associates, GOP Launches New ProbesNBC 7 San Diego
Satire: Russia Investigation Will End Trump PresidencyLiberty Nation (satire) (blog)
all 93 

all 7 news articles »

Putin at Valdai: A Deep Dive Into Long-Standing Grievances – EurasiaNet
 


CNSNews.com (blog)
Putin at Valdai: A Deep Dive Into Long-Standing Grievances
EurasiaNet
During his October 19 appearance at the Valdai Club, Russian President Vladimir Putin focused on the past to a disconcerting degree, reiterating Russia’s long-standing complaints about the US and exhibiting a conspiratorial mindset, but provided no 
Hillary Clinton Says This Political Adversary Was ‘a Pretty Clear Exhibit of Sexism in Motion’CNSNews.com (blog)
Russia-China Tandem Changes the WorldConsortium Newsall 129 89 news articles »

Today’s Headlines and Commentary

The Trump administration will allow refugee admissions from all countries to resume and will put in place stricter screening measures, the Wall Street Journal reported. The refugee program was put on hold this summer as part of the administrations travel ban for a 120-day period that expires on Tuesday. The increased vetting measures will include more extensive collection of biographical data and investigation into applicants social media history.Senator John McCain called for a new congressional authorization for the use of military force for U.S. military operations overseas, Politico reported. McCain, the chairman of the Senate Armed Forces Committee, said the recent deaths of four U.S. soldiers in Niger called into question the extent of U.S. military operations around the globe. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Secretary of Defense James Mattis will testify at a Senate hearing on the authorization for the use of military force next week.

Pakistans prime minister pledged to support U.S. counterrorism efforts during a meeting on Tuesday with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Reuters reported. Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi affirmed Pakistans continued support for the war against terror and said the country had produced results in efforts against Al Qaeda and the Taliban.

The State Department warned Myanmars military leadership that it held them accountable for atrocities committed against the Rohingya ethnic minority, Reuters reported. A spokesperson for the State Department said on Monday it is considering targeted sanctions measures against officials that have facilitated human rights abuses. More than 600,000 Rohingya have left Myanmar as refugees since the crisis began.

Michael Cohen, a former attorney for President Trump, will speak with congressional investigators from the House and Senate intelligence committees this week, NBC News reported. In August, NPR reported that Cohen contacted Russian government officials to get assistance with a permit for a Trump real estate deal in Moscow.

The U.S.-led coalition in Syria denied striking Syrian-government held positions in Deir al-Zour city, according to Reuters reported.  Syrian state television accused the coalition of carrying out airstrikes that killed at least 14 people on Monday. A coalition spokesperson said its air forces had not conducted any strikes in the Syrian-government held parts of the city.

The Department of Justice will allow tech companies to alert their customers to law enforcement requests for their personal data, Ars Technica reported. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein said in a memo last week that the department would drop its practice of requiring gag orders for companies that surrender customer data to legal authorities. In response, Microsoft dropped a lawsuit against the Department of Justice challenging the gag orders.

British lawmakers asked Facebook for information about Russia-linked advertisements on its platform during the Brexit vote and 2017 parliamentary elections, Reuters reported on Tuesday.  Damian Collins, the head of a parliamentary inquiry into false and misleading news stories, made the request as part of an effort to understand the impact of foreign actors on social media.

A military judge ordered the civilian defense team for Rahim al-Nashiri back to the military court after the lawyers quit last week over ethical conflicts, the Miami Herald reported. Judge Vance Spath contradicted militarys chief defense counsel Gen. John Bakers order to dismiss the civilian members of al-Nashiris defense team. Baker had dismissed the lawyers after they brought up an ethical conflict of interest over a classified matter. Judge Spath ordered the attorneys to appear at the next court hearing in two weeks.

Iraqi militias launched an offensive against a Kurdish-held oil pipeline hub near the Turkish border on Tuesday, Reuters reported. Kurdish forces pledged to defend the area, which is a conduit for oil exports that provide vital revenue to the Kurdish Regional Government.

A bipartisan group of senators will introduce a bill that would require the FBI to obtain warrants to search data collected under the authority of Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, Reuters reported. Senators Ron Wyden and Rand Paul said their bill to reauthorize the intelligence communitys surveillance authorities under Section 702 would include more transparency and oversight mechanisms. It would allow individuals to more easily challenge surveillance in court and would expand the role of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board.

 

ICYMI: Yesterday on Lawfare

Matthew Kahn analyzed the legislative history behind the 25th Amendment and its applications in cases of presidential disability.

Josh Blackman argued that the Hawaii District Courts injunction against the most recent travel ban order does pass the rational basis test.

Vanessa Sauter posted a letter from a group of former national security officials urging the reauthorization of FISA Section 702 surveillance authorities.

Sabrina McCubbin summarized pre-trial motions in Smith v. Trump, a case challenging the application of the 2001 AUMF to the Islamic State.

Rick Ledgett argued that the only way for Kasperksy to regain users trust would be for it allow independent monitoring of all its anti-virus activities.

Matthew Kahn flagged a draft Section 702 reauthorization bill from the Senate intelligence committee.

Garrett Hinck described a strange sequence of events related to exiled Chinese billionaire Guo Wengui and the Trump administration.

 

Email the Roundup Team noteworthy law and security-related articles to include, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook for additional commentary on these issues. Sign up to receive Lawfare in your inbox. Visit ourEvents Calendar to learn about upcoming national security events, and check out relevant job openings on ourJob Board.

Michael Bloomberg: Brexit is stupidest thing any country has done besides Trump

Exclusive: Billionaire media mogul says it is hard to understand why a country doing so well wanted to ruin itMichael Bloomberg, the billionaire media mogul and former mayor of New York, has said Brexit is the single stupidest thing any country has ever done apart from the election of Donald Trump as US president.

Bloomberg The 75-year old argued that it is really hard to understand why a country that was doing so well wanted to ruin it with the Brexit vote, in a series of outspoken remarks made at a technology conference in Boston a fortnight ago.

Related: With evidence of a failing Brexit, who needs prophecy? | Rafael Behr

Related: Trump won’t stop Americans hitting the Paris climate targets. Here’s how we do it | Michael Bloomberg

Continue reading…

Protester Throws Russian Flags At Trump As He Arrives For Capitol Hill Tax Lunch – NPR
 


NPR
Protester Throws Russian Flags At Trump As He Arrives For Capitol Hill Tax Lunch
NPR
President Trump was met by a protester who threw Russian flags at him and chanted “Trump is treason!” as he arrived on Capitol Hill to urge Senate Republicans to pass tax cuts. While the president was entering the weekly GOP lunch on Capitol Hill, …
Protester Throws Russian Flags at Trump Inside CapitolNBCNews.com
Protester throws Russian flags at President Donald Trump before Capitol Hill lunchABC News
Protester Throws Russian Flags at Trump: ‘Treason!’Daily Beast
Fox News –Bloomberg –The Week Magazine
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FEATURED POSTS: 7:57 AM 9/20/2017 – PUTIN’S PRO-TRUMP OPERATION MAY HAVE BEEN FAR BIGGER THAN WE YET KNOW – MOTHER JONES | ANATOMY OF A RUSSIAN ATTACK

“We don’t know what these Facebook ads looked like, we don’t know who they were targeting, and we don’t know how many millions of Americans may have been exposed to them.”

Putin’s Pro-Trump Operation May Have Been Far Bigger Than We Yet Know
Did the Kremlin help make Trump the “first Facebook president”?
BILL BUZENBERG – SEP. 20, 2017 6:00 AM

M.N.: And we have to know the answers to these and many other questions. 

Image result for Big Brother Trump

12:26 PM 9/20/2017 – “Political marketing” and possible use of the “psychotronic weapons” techniques in targeted advertising

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