M.N.: Who are these “staffers”, and where are they now? Moscow, St. Petersburg, other guesses?

Share this article
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

“Of the 13 Cambridge staffers who worked in Trump’s San Antonio office, only four remain at the company.”

What Did Cambridge Analytica Really Do for Trump’s Campaign?
In-DepthWIREDOct 26, 2017

M.N.: Who are these “staffers”, and where are they now? Moscow, St. Petersburg, other guesses?

The Russian Cyber Weapons – 10:21 AM 10/29/2017 – M.N.: This article is the additional piece of the puzzle that fits tightly with the thoughts that I described in my previous posts: “Putin Starts Aiming His Cyberweapons Against Individuals”: “Russia recruits psychiatrists, scientists, and neurologists, who construct these things to target particular individuals,” Shymkiv said. – Trump Investigations Report

1 Share

Image result for russian cyber weapons

russian cyber weapons

M.N.: This article is the additional piece of the puzzle that fits tightly with the thoughts that I described in my previous posts:

The Invisible Cyber Leash Of The Cambridge Analytica – News and Posts Review – 10.21 – 28.17

Now we can make a conclusion that the Cyber Weapons: the mass, including the pre-electoral ones, and the individual, including anti-dissenting ones, are developed and used by the Russians. These thesis and hypothesis are of the enormous significance. The FBI would commit the criminally negligent blunder if it does not look into this, now and in-depth, and if it does not take the comprehensive defensive measures and the counter-measures. 

It also has the important implications for the Mueller’s Inquiry: Did the Cambridge Analytica use any of the algorithms developed by the Russians in Trump’s campaign work? Did they communicate with each other in the process of the campaign, besides the recently surfaced reports on the interactions between Alexander Nix, a head of the Cambridge Analytica, and Assange? Were they paid by the Russians? Is the money paid to them (about $6ml, reportedly) of the Russian origin? 

The issue of the effect and the impact, just like in Brexit, remain unaddressed. and they are difficult to approach and to study, but they absolutely should be. 

One of the overarching and pertinent questions:

Is the Cambridge Analytica actually a Russian front and a hidden (although in plain sight), new, mass, and possibly individual, custom-designed Cyber-Weapon?! What are the other companies of this type, and what do they do? 

Michael Novakhov

10.29.17

_______________________________

Dmytro Shymkiv, deputy head of the Presidential Administration of Ukraine on Administrative, Social and Economic Reform, explained this month during the Future in Review conference in Park City, Utah.

“Russia recruits psychiatrists, scientists, and neurologists, who construct these things to target particular individuals,” Shymkiv said.

According to Ukrainian security officials, Russian agents build a psychological profile of their mark through his or her social media footprint. Then, using that information, the Russians can make personalized computer viruses, or run a social media influence operation specifically crafted with that one particular person in mind.

Read the whole story
· · ·

Matt Oczkowski – Google Search

1 Share
Story image for Matt Oczkowski from WIRED

What Did Cambridge Analytica Really Do for Trump’s Campaign?

WIREDOct 26, 2017
In June 2016, Cambridge sent three staffers, led by chief product officer Matt Oczkowski, to the campaign’s San Antonio office. Oczkowski’s …
Story image for Matt Oczkowski from Washington Post

Trump campaign alumni launch email fundraising start-up

Washington PostMay 16, 2017
Last fall, Matt Oczkowski and Parks Bennett were logging 12-hour days in a rented office in San Antonio that smelled of Chick-fil-A and Doritos, …
Story image for Matt Oczkowski from CMO

Interview: Trump’s chief data scientist reveals the data approach that …

CMOApr 5, 2017
If there’s one takeaway President Trump’s lead data scientist, Matt Oczkowski, can offer brands after working on the Republican candidate’s …
Story image for Matt Oczkowski from WIRED

Trump’s Big Data Mind Explains How He Knew Trump Could Win

WIREDNov 9, 2016
… and races in tight states like Pennsylvania and New Hampshire were still undecided, but Matt Oczkowski and everyone else on Trump’s data, …
Read the whole story
· ·

What Did Cambridge Analytica Really Do for Trump’s Campaign?

1 Share

News that Cambridge Analytica CEO Alexander Nix approached Wikileaks founder Julian Assange last year to exploit Hillary Clinton’s private emails has amplified questions about Cambridge’s role in President Trump’s 2016 campaign.

Shortly after The Daily Beast reported Nix’s contact with Assange Wednesday, the Trump campaign’s executive director sought to downplay Cambridge’s role. Michael Glassner said in a statement that the Republican National Committee was the campaign’s primary source of voter data. “Any claims that voter data from any other source played a key role in the victory are false,” Michael Glassner wrote. The statement did not respond to reporting in WIRED and elsewhere revealing a close relationship between the Trump campaign and Cambridge staffers. Cambridge did not respond to WIRED’s request for comment.

So, what gives? Such he-said-she-said battles are usually better left to Beltway happy hours. But as Congress and special investigator Robert Mueller turn their spotlights on Cambridge Analytica in their probes into Russian meddling in the 2016 election, it’s essential to get the facts straight about what the firm did—and didn’t—do for the Trump campaign.

Here’s what we know.

Cambridge worked both for the Trump campaign and a Trump-aligned Super PAC. In June 2016, Cambridge sent three staffers, led by chief product officer Matt Oczkowski, to the campaign’s San Antonio office. Oczkowski’s team eventually grew to 13 people, working under Trump digital director Brad Parscale and alongside his staff and outside consultants. According to Parscale, the Cambridge staff provided useful analysis of data about the American electorate. They did not, however, provide the raw data—things like demographic information, contact information, and data about how voters feel about different issues—on which that analysis was done.

That may sound like a small distinction, but it’s a crucial one. Ever since it burst onto the scene of American politics in 2015, Cambridge has trumpeted its massive data trove, boasting 5,000 data points on every American. Cambridge claims to have built extensive personality profiles on every American, which it uses for so-called “psychographic targeting,” based on people’s personality types. It is feared by some, including Hillary Clinton, for conducting a kind of psychological warfare against the American people and dismissed by others as snake oil. Both Parscale and Oczkowski have said repeatedly that the Trump campaign did not use psychographic targeting. Questions also have swirled about how Cambridge accumulated the data. Liberal voters in particular worried that their data had been harvested without their knowledge and used to elect Trump. But according to both Parscale and Oczkowski, the campaign didn’t use Cambridge’s trove of data, opting instead for the RNC’s data file.

“The RNC was the voter file of record for the campaign, but we were the intelligence on top of the voter file,” Oczkowski says. “Sometimes the sales pitch can be a bit inflated, and I think people can misconstrue that.”

Parscale describes the firm’s work this way: “As I’ve said multiple times over prior statements, Matt Oczkowski and his team created a daily tracker of polling, so that I could see how Trump was doing in key swing states. They provided that to me daily.” Parscale says Cambridge also helped the campaign with what he calls “persuasion online media buying. They also helped us identify potential donors. And they created a visualization tool that showed in each state which areas were most persuadable and what those voters care about.”

Cambridge Analytica was paid $5.9 million by the Trump campaign, according to Federal Election Commission filings, $5 million of which went toward buying television ads, with the remainder going to pay Oczkowski and his team. But that wasn’t the only work Cambridge did for the campaign. Parscale says Cambridge’s head of digital, Molly Schweikert, managed an advertising budget of roughly $12 million on behalf of Parscale’s firm, Giles-Parscale. It’s a sizable, but still small slice of the $94 million Giles-Parscale was paid in total to purchase the campaign’s ads.

The Cambridge staff helped the campaign identify which voters in the RNC’s data file were most likely to be persuadable, meaning they were undecided but looked likely to swing toward Trump. They also created lists of voters who were most likely to become donors. In August 2016, a Trump aide told meCambridge was critical to helping the campaign raise $80 million in the prior month, after a primary race that had been largely self-funded by Trump. This was the only period during which Oczkowski’s staff relied on Cambridge’s data, because the RNC was just beginning to share its data with the Trump team.

Cambridge went on to conduct hundreds of thousands of voter surveys for the Trump campaign to better understand the likely Trump voter and sent a full-time staffer to the New York headquarters, who could relay these findings to senior staff, including Parscale. Based on these surveys, RNC data, data the Trump team collected itself, and commercially available information from data brokers, Oczkowski’s team developed a heat map of the country to pinpoint where Trump should visit to maximize his impact on potentially persuadable voters.

Oczkowski views this as a collaborative effort between his team, the RNC, the campaign, and other vendors, including Deep Root Analytics, which helped the campaign target television ads. “At the end of the day, when candidates win elections, it’s a big team effort,” he says.

The RNC played a very important role in that team. Gary Coby, director of advertising at the RNC, managed the bulk of the campaign’s advertising purchases on Facebook. The campaign famously ran 175,000 variations of the same ad on Facebook the day of the third presidential debate in October 2016, a tactic Coby refers to as “A/B testing on steroids.” The RNC also ran the campaign’s field operations and worked with Parscale to plan get-out-the-vote advertising campaigns on television and online.

What’s also clear, however, is that the Trump campaign seems to have ample motivation to distance itself from Cambridge, a firm whose tactics have sometimes raised questions. Adding to the intrigue is the fact that shadowy billionaire and Trump supporter Robert Mercer is Cambridge’s main financial backer. Former Trump campaign manager and chief strategist to President Trump, Steve Bannon, also held a position on Cambridge’s board. The company itself is an offshoot of the British firm, SCL, which has roots in government and military operations.

Now, Assange’s confirmation that Cambridge’s CEO wanted to join forces against Clinton has renewed suspicions about the company’s business tactics, suspicions that the Trump team would very much like to avoid in the face of ongoing investigations into Russian meddling in the election.

“I had absolutely no understanding any of this was going on, and I was surprised as everybody else when I saw the story” about Nix’s approach to Assange, Oczkowski says. During the campaign, he says his team was walled off from the rest of Cambridge, because the company was also working with a Trump Super PAC. Federal regulations prevent campaigns from coordinating with Super PACs.

Of the 13 Cambridge staffers who worked in Trump’s San Antonio office, only four remain at the company.

Still, for some in Congress, the web of connections among Nix, the campaign, and now, Assange, seems too close for comfort. The House Intelligence Committee has acquired Cambridge staffers’ email records, which it is currently analyzing for clues of inappropriate contact with foreign actors trying to meddle in the election. Next week, representatives from Facebook, Twitter, and Google will testify before both the House and Senate intelligence committees and will likely face questions about their interactions with Trump’s digital team and members of Cambridge’s staff.

And investigators will, no doubt, continue to question members of team Trump about Nix’s communication with Assange. The panels will be seeking answers. But, as is often the case when it comes to Cambridge, each answer will likely only lead to more questions.

Read the whole story
· · · · ·

Assange – Google Search

1 Share
Story image for Assange from Politico

Assange: Trump-tied firm sought WikiLeaks’ help before election

PoliticoOct 25, 2017
One of the Trump campaign’s top data firms sought to connect with Julian Assange before the 2016 election, the Wikileaks founder said on …
Trump Data Guru: I Tried to Team Up With Julian Assange
Highly CitedDaily BeastOct 25, 2017
Trump Campaign’s Data Firm Contacted WikiLeaks to Ask for …
BlogSlate Magazine (blog)Oct 25, 2017

russian cyber weapons – Google Search

1 Share
Image result for russian cyber weapons

russian cyber weapons – Google Search

1 Share

Putin Starts Aiming His Cyberweapons Against Individuals

Newsweek9 hours ago
Kiev, Ukraine—Since 2014, Russia has used Ukraine as a testing ground for its hybrid warfare doctrine, underscoring what some security …
Story image for russian cyber weapons from Vanity Fair

Russians Reportedly Used Anti-Virus Software to Steal US Cyber …

Vanity FairOct 5, 2017
Russians Reportedly Used Anti-Virus Software to Steal U.S. CyberWeapons … Officials were “concerned about the ties between certain Kaspersky officials and Russian intelligence and other government agencies,” the …
Story image for russian cyber weapons from Boing Boing

Kaspersky’s explanation for possessing secret NSA cyberweapons …

Boing BoingOct 25, 2017
Kaspersky — a respected Russia-based security company — has been under a cloud since they were accused of stealing NSA cyberweapons …
Story image for russian cyber weapons from NPR

Foreign Interference Has Bedeviled DC For Decades, With No Easy …

NPR4 hours ago
The U.S. has already increased sanctions on Russia in retaliation for the … with billions of users, no cyberweapons and no social networks.
Read the whole story
· ·
Next Page of Stories
Loading…
Page 2

Dmytro Shymkiv – Google Search

1 Share
Story image for Dmytro Shymkiv from Newsweek

Putin Starts Aiming His Cyberweapons Against Individuals

Newsweek8 hours ago
… in particular departments, and they’re constructed based on the social understanding of social media by particular people,” Dmytro Shymkiv, …
Story image for Dmytro Shymkiv from Daily Signal

Russia Field-Tested Hybrid Warfare in Ukraine. Why That …

Daily SignalOct 27, 2017
… in particular departments, and they’re constructed based on the social understanding of social media by particular people,” Dmytro Shymkiv, …
Story image for Dmytro Shymkiv from Ukrinform. Ukraine and world news

International community should unite against cyberwar launched by …

Ukrinform. Ukraine and world newsOct 20, 2017
Deputy Head of the Presidential Administration of Ukraine Dmytro Shymkiv said this in an exclusive comment to Ukrinform during the 13th …
Story image for Dmytro Shymkiv from The Weekly Standard

The Mother of All Fake News

The Weekly StandardSep 29, 2017
In an email, Dmytro Shymkiv, the deputy head of Presidential Administration of Ukraine, said: “The event on Capitol Hill about the National …
Read the whole story
· ·

Putin Starts Aiming His Cyberweapons Against Individuals

1 Share

This article first appeared on The Daily Signal.

Kiev, Ukraine—Since 2014, Russia has used Ukraine as a testing ground for its hybrid warfare doctrine, underscoring what some security experts say is a case study for the new kinds of security threats the U.S. and its Western allies can anticipate from Moscow.

“The threats Ukraine faces are harbingers of things to come for the U.S. and its other allies,” said Junaid Islam, chief technology officer and president of Vidder, a California-based cybersecurity firm that does work in Ukraine.

Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now

“It is in the national strategic interests of both the United States and Ukraine to cooperate deeply in cybersecurity, because Ukraine is a canary in the cyberspace coal mine,” Islam told The Daily Signal.

A top Ukrainian security official recently disclosed a cyberwarfare tactic honed by Russia in Ukraine, which could be a bellwether for Russia’s next act of political warfare against the U.S.

The Ukrainian government recently has been attacked by “undetectable” computer viruses that target “particular individuals, in particular departments, and they’re constructed based on the social understanding of social media by particular people,” Dmytro Shymkiv, deputy head of the Presidential Administration of Ukraine on Administrative, Social and Economic Reform, explained this month during the Future in Review conference in Park City, Utah.

“Russia recruits psychiatrists, scientists, and neurologists, who construct these things to target particular individuals,” Shymkiv said.

According to Ukrainian security officials, Russian agents build a psychological profile of their mark through his or her social media footprint. Then, using that information, the Russians can make personalized computer viruses, or run a social media influence operation specifically crafted with that one particular person in mind.

“People say, ‘Well, that’s a science fiction.’ It’s not,” Shymkiv said. “When the annexation of Crimea took place, [Russia] shut down the internet to Ukraine, and they used social media to influence people’s behavior. And you can influence people’s behavior. You do it in a nice way, posting things to their friends, et cetera. There’s a whole factory in Russia doing this.”

Vladimir Putin in Sochi on October 19, 2017. ALEXANDER ZEMLIANICHENKO/AFP/Getty

This is known in the cybersecurity world as “social engineering”—a form of cyberattack in which people are psychologically manipulated into performing actions or divulging confidential information. According to some security experts, the best defense against this kind of threat is education.

“Man is the weakest link in the chain of information technology,” Mykhailo Vasyanovich, head of the Public Council for the Ministry of Information Policy of Ukraine, told The Daily Signal.

“With such cyberattacks, which are now taking place in Ukraine, it is necessary to raise the level of information technology literacy of users by conducting educational work on cybersecurity among employees of private and state enterprises,” Vasyanovich said.

Some experts worry this reliance on the security savvy of internet users to fend off Russian cyberattacks might be a vulnerability for the U.S.

“What may especially worry the U.S. is that Russia targets influential individuals, such as journalists or political analysts, especially those of rather skeptical approach toward Moscow,” Daniel Szeligowski, senior research fellow on Ukraine for the Polish Institute of International Affairs, told The Daily Signal.

“Unlike institutions or infrastructure, they don’t have state protection and are thus vulnerable to intimidation and blackmailing,” Szeligowski added. “And given the rising popularity of social media, such a threat is even more widespread.”

Hybrid War

Russia’s hybrid attacks against Ukraine have included, but are not limited to:

  • Using social media to shape public opinion among an adversary’s population.
  • Turning commercially available computer software into a tool for espionage and cyberwarfare.
  • Exploiting smartphones to spy on and wage psychological warfare against an adversary’s military forces.
  • Using cyberattacks to undermine an adversary’s electoral process.
  • Using pseudo-news reports to push a propaganda line that sows division within an adversary’s national culture.

All of these tactics have also been used by Russia against the U.S. since Russo-American relations took a nosedive in the fallout over Russia’s military aggression against Ukraine in early 2014.

“Ukraine is a perfect testing ground for hybrid warfare,” Szeligowski said. “Thus, it is no wonder that Russia has already seized the opportunity, and in Ukraine it has made a dry run of all sorts of its offensive techniques.”

Russian hybrid warfare is not covert warfare. Rather, it’s the combined use of conventional military force with other means such as cyberattacks and propaganda to sow chaos and confusion—both on the battlefield and deep behind the front lines.

Hybrid warfare is an evolving threat spanning every combat domain. Particularly, hybrid warfare weaponizes many pieces of everyday life, including smartphones, social media networks, commercially available computer software, and journalism.

“Russia is testing in Ukraine both procedures and concepts, which later on are being applied in the West—such as during the U.S. and French elections,” a Polish security official told The Daily Signal on background, asking not to be named due to professional restrictions on speaking to the media.

“In short, Ukraine remains for Russia a crucial hybrid warfare battleground and testbed,” the security official said. “The Russian hybrid warfare model is being further developed, perfected, and tested as we speak. Russia’s ability to escalate rapidly across the whole spectrum of conflict makes the West prone to the ‘surprise effect.’”

Russia’s use of social media and cyberattacks as weapons of war might be innovative, but, at its core, it’s a modern revamp of a Cold War-era idea.

Hybrid warfare is the Kremlin’s contemporary take on a Soviet military doctrine called “deep battle,” in which front-line combat operations are supported with operations to spread chaos and confusion deep within the enemy’s country. Hybrid warfare also draws on the Soviet Union’s well-documented history of “influence operations” against the U.S. and other Western allies.

In effect, Russia’s overall strategy to undermine the West hasn’t changed all that much from the Soviet Union’s playbook. But the world in which those Soviet theories are now put into practice is a radically different one than during the Cold War.

The advent of the internet, and social media in particular, has given the Kremlin direct access to the populations of its adversaries—bypassing the gatekeeper role America’s media institutions used to play.

“Everything today is digitized, including phone and mail services, and everything runs on the same network,” Kenneth Geers, ambassador of NATO’s cybersecurity center and a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council, told The Daily Signal. “There is only one internet, and one cyberspace, inhabited by all of the world’s citizens, soldiers, spies, and statesmen.”

Meanwhile, Americans’ distrust in their media institutions has reached historic levels. Russia has stealthily taken advantage of Americans’ crisis of confidence in the media to permeate the U.S. news cycle with misinformation spread by propaganda mouthpieces cloaked as alternative news sources, such as RT and Sputnik.

Lessons Learned

Some commercial cybersecurity firms have stepped in both to harden Ukraine’s cyberdefenses and use lessons learned from Ukraine to craft better defenses for the U.S. to counter Russia.

“With the world increasingly digital and connected, Ukraine is of strategic, vital interest to the West,” said Greg Ness, a cybersecurity specialist and vice president of marketing at Vidder. “What happens in Ukraine doesn’t stay in Ukraine.”

California-based Vidder has put together a team of cybersecurity experts to comprise the core of a proposed U.S.-Ukraine cybersecurity center with offices in Kiev, Washington, and Silicon Valley.

“By ensuring that Ukraine adopts leading cybersecurity solutions and best practices, we will not only provide Ukraine with the best protection from cyberattacks, but it also helps U.S. experts develop new and more effective technologies and strategies in the future,” Islam, Vidder’s president, told The Daily Signal. “It will also help establish Ukraine as a secure, stable, prosperous, and reliable ally in Eastern Europe.”

The war in Ukraine has shaped how NATO forces are training for the next military conflict. On Thursday, NATO and Ukraine launched a joint center to counter hybrid warfare. The center is part of the Comprehensive Assistance Package that NATO pledged to Ukraine during the alliance’s summit in Warsaw last year.

According to NATO, the joint center will be “a platform for identifying lessons learned from hybrid war in Ukraine.”

For its part, the U.S. military has reportedly been studying the war in Ukraine to shape its own military doctrine.

Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, the Trump administration’s national security adviser,  recently directed a study to analyze Russia’s hybrid warfare tactics in Ukraine in order to craft recommendations for the U.S. Army.

Szeligowski added, however, that not all of Russia’s hybrid warfare tactics in Ukraine would be effective against the U.S.

“There is a yawning gap between Ukrainian and American cyber capabilities, not to mention cultural and linguistic differences between Russians and Americans,” Szeligowski said. “But it goes beyond any doubt that, at least at some point, Russia already used hybrid warfare instruments against the U.S.—and did it effectively.”

Hybrid Way of Life

The effects of Russia’s proxy war against Ukraine are limited to a 250-mile-long static front line in southeastern Ukraine’s Donbas region. The war is moderated in intensity and is geographically frozen according to the rules of the February 2015 cease-fire deal, known as Minsk II.

More than 10,100 Ukrainians have died so far in the war. The conflict has displaced about 1.7 million people. Yet, the physical consequences of the war are quarantined from most of the country. Outside the range of the artillery, mortars, rockets, and tank shots, you’d hardly know there was war going on.

On a physical battlefield, a war extends as far as the range of the weapons used. In hybrid warfare, however, the battlefield knows no limit.

Consequently, there’s hardly any part of Ukrainian life that hasn’t been affected by Russia’s ongoing hybrid war.

Russian cyberattacks have hit Ukraine’s power grid, water supply systems, the country’s banking system (shutting down ATMs), its largest international airport, and the electoral process.

In December 2016, a cyberattack, which Ukrainian officials attributed to Russia, took down one-fifth of Kiev’s electrical grid. Since 2014, Ukrainian security services have thwarted numerous cyberattacks in which malware from abroad was used in attempts to steal classified information from Ukrainian government networks.

In the eyes of Ukrainian security officials, the internet has become as much of a battlefield as the trenches in the Donbas region. The main goal of Russia’s information warfare, according to Ukrainian security officials, is to incite civil unrest throughout all of Ukraine and to undermine the government’s credibility.

Since 2014, Ukraine has established a Situation Center for Cybersecurity, and Ukrainian officials have fostered closer ties to Western intelligence agencies to bolster their cyberdefenses.

Security State

Russia’s purchase of $100,000 worth of Facebook advertisements in the run-up to the 2016 U.S. presidential election sparked a media frenzy in America and an outcry from lawmakers for social media sites to provide better transparency about the identity of those who purchase advertisements on their sites.

In Ukraine, Russia has been exploiting social media as a weapon of war for years.

In a sweeping ban announced in May, Ukrainian officials banned Russian internet search engines, including Yandex, as well as popular Russian social media sites such as VKontakte, which millions of Ukrainians used.

The ban prompted some pushback from Ukrainians, who used these sites for many daily tasks and for social reasons. But Ukrainian officials insisted the sites posed a national security threat, which warranted the free speech trade-off.

Also in May, Ukraine banned commercially available Russian software, including anti-virus software from Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab—the same company U.S. officials now say was used as a Trojan horse for Russian intelligence agencies to steal classified information from the U.S. government.

“The risk that the Russian government, whether acting on its own or in collaboration with Kaspersky, could capitalize on access provided by Kaspersky products to compromise federal information and information systems directly implicates U.S. national security,” the Department of Homeland Security said in a Sept. 13 statement posted to its website.

U.S. intelligence officials said Russian intelligence services had modified anti-virus software from Kaspersky Lab to clandestinely search computers around the world for classified U.S. government documents and top-secret information.

“Possessing a worldwide deployment of sensors may be too great a temptation for any country’s intelligence service to ignore, and Kaspersky may have been forced into a quiet business partnership with the Russian government,” Geers, the NATO cybersecurity specialist, said.

Similarly, news reports recently detailed how Russian military forces have been targeting the smartphones of NATO troops to gather intelligence.

Ukrainian soldiers in the eastern war zone have long been advised by their leaders not to turn on their smartphones while in the war zone. Russian forces reportedly have used the cell signals emitting from Ukrainian soldiers’ phones to target its artillery.

And for years Ukrainian soldiers have reported receiving death threats and demands for their surrender from their enemies over cellphone text messages.

New Weapons

Journalism has been one of Russia’s most lethal weapons against Ukraine.

Ukrainian officials have banned a slew of Russian TV stations from broadcasting in Ukraine, and foreign journalists accused of spreading Russian propaganda have been booted out of the country.

Anti-propaganda outlets in Ukraine such as <a href=”http://StopFake.org” rel=”nofollow”>StopFake.org</a> also monitor media reports for Russian disinformation and are dedicated to setting the record straight.

To counter Russian propaganda in the war zone, Ukraine’s government has rebuilt its TV and radio broadcast network in the east—which Russia and its separatist proxies destroyed in the opening days of the war.

For years, Ukrainian citizens in eastern Ukraine could access only Russian TV channels for their news. Now, Ukraine has taken back control of the airwaves. While not as evident or as spectacular as the artillery bombardments and the tank battles, the battle for broadcast dominance in eastern Ukraine is a key piece of the overall war effort for Kiev.

After all, many Ukrainian citizens in eastern Ukraine can’t tell whether the artillery they are living under is fired from Ukrainian or Russian forces. And so long as they had access only to Russian television networks—which exclusively painted Ukrainian forces as the aggressor and, consequently, responsible for all civilian casualties—public opinion toward Ukraine’s central government was under an endless stress test as the war dragged on.

Now, with Ukraine able to defend itself on the airwaves, Russia has lost a potent weapon to turn the citizens of eastern Ukraine against their own government.

Similarly, U.S. lawmakers have debated how to defend the U.S. population against Kremlin-backed news outlets, including RT (formerly Russia Today) and Sputnik, which U.S. officials have called out as Russian propaganda mouthpieces.

The FBI reportedly has turned to a U.S. law intended to prevent the spread of Nazi propaganda to determine whether the two Russian media outlets should register as foreign agents.

In America, as has been the case in Ukraine, manipulation of the media by a foreign power increasingly is regarded as a hostile act warranting retaliation.

“America has experienced a sustained attempt by a hostile power to feed and exploit our country’s division,” former President George W. Bush said in an Oct. 19 speech in New York.

Russia “has made a project of turning Americans against each other,” Bush said, adding, “Foreign aggressions, including cyberattacks, disinformation, and financial influence, should never be downplayed or tolerated.”

Nolan Peterson, a former special operations pilot and a combat veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan, is The Daily Signal’s foreign correspondent based in Ukraine.

Read the whole story
· · · · · · · · · · · ·

Putin Starts Aiming His Cyberweapons Against Individuals – Newsweek

1 Share

Newsweek
Putin Starts Aiming His Cyberweapons Against Individuals
Newsweek
According to Ukrainian security officials, Russian agents build a psychological profile of their mark through his or her social media footprint. Then, using that information, the Russians can make personalized computer viruses, or run a social media 

and more »

The ‘dossier’ and the uranium deal: A guide to the latest allegations – Washington Post

1 Share

Washington Post
The ‘dossier’ and the uranium deal: A guide to the latest allegations
Washington Post
As a service to readers bound to be confused by an increasingly tangled story, here’s a brief guide to the latest developments in the tangled allegations involving Russia, President Trumpand Hillary Clinton …

and more »

The biggest predictor of Trump’s election was racist Google searches

1 Share

Donald Trump’s 2016 electoral win was more accurately predicted by racist searches on Google than any other data set.

On a map, the US states with the highest searches for racist things such as jokes compared with a map of Trump’s biggest wins were remarkably similar.

Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, author of New York Times best seller Everybody Liesused anonymous internet data, particularly Google searches – of which there are 3.5 billion every day – to gain new insights into the human psyche.

In a wide-ranging show at the Brisbane Powerhouse on Sunday, he touched on topics from Australia’s anxiety to India’s breastfeeding epidemic.

The main message he had was don’t believe what people tell you; just because they said they support same-sex marriage doesn’t mean they will vote “yes”.

“Everyone here tells me they’re chill here but I’ve analysed the data and you’re not nearly as chill as you think you are,” Mr Stephens-Davidowitz said.

Advertisement

And he wasn’t lying – using Google data accessible to the public, he found Australia is a very anxious country.

Australia is the most anxious country in the world ahead of Ireland and Canada.

“They’ve [anxiety-related searches] shot way up, they’ve basically tripled since 2010.”

A surprising find he made when searching the data of the world for answers was for India.

This was a search he was proud of finding – the number one search in India is “my husband wants me to breastfeed him.”

Indian newspapers followed up his finding and interviewed people about the search.

All those interviewed said it was untrue and that Mr Stephens-Davidowitz was crazy.

The data he analyses, he said, can be used to potentially predict certain events.

Google searches for the likes of “kill Muslims” can be cross-related to where hate crimes are committed.

When former US president Barack Obama tried to cool religious tensions after the San Bernardino shootings in which Muslims were the killers, searches for “kill Muslims” went up.

When Obama told people about what Muslims had done for the country and their successes, the searches dropped and curiosity took place.

For weeks after his speech the top searches were for Muslim athletes and other Muslim accomplishments.

The search data could be used to predict health problems, too.

Those at a high risk for pancreatic cancer searched for both chest pain and heart burn.

The searches separately were not a good enough indicator.

WLTH presents What Google can tell us about who we really are: A window into the human psyche with Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, in partnership with the Brisbane Times, as part of James Street’s RESORT series.

Read the whole story
· ·

The biggest predictor of Trump’s election was racist Google searches – The Sydney Morning Herald

1 Share

The Sydney Morning Herald
The biggest predictor of Trump’s election was racist Google searches
The Sydney Morning Herald
Donald Trump’s 2016 electoral win was more accurately predicted by racist searches on Google than any other data set. On a map, the US states with the highest searches for racist things such as jokes compared with a map of Trump’s biggest wins were …

and more »

Next Page of Stories
Loading…
Page 3

Trump Investigations Report – Current News | Reviews of media reports | Selected reading lists | Video and Audio News | News Topics RSS Feeds | News, Reviews, Analysis, Opinions

1 Share

See also:

Top House Dems ask Trump data firms if they communicated with Russians – The Hill

Cambridge Analytica (GS) News Review – 10.21 – 28.17

Previous Posts on Cambridge Analytica (Category):

28.10.2017 17:29
From: NewsOnABC
Duration: 04:08

Planet Americas John Barron explains how Facebook and Twitter helped weaponize the Trump campaign.

See also: Category: Social Media and Elections 2016

“The technologies can capture what people are thinking at a particular moment,” Albright told me, “and serve it back to them over and over again.” And with the benefit of psychographic profiling, he adds, they’re able to deliver “content on an individual basis on Twitter and Facebook feeds where people are being grabbed and pulled in certain directions through certain types of posts and stories.

“I’ve called it an emotional leash,” Woolley said.”

See alsoCategory: Russia’s Info War on the U.S.

Links

10.28.17

Grand Jury Approves First Charges in Mueller’s Russia Probe, Report Says – NBC News
trump investigations indictments 2017 – YouTube
trump investigations – YouTube
trump – YouTube
Exclusive: First charges filed in Mueller investigation – CNNPolitics
Facebook’s opaque algorithms, not Russian ads, are the real problem
Former CIA Director James Woolsey – Google Search
Former CIA Director James Woolsey – Google Search
Ex-CIA Director Spoke to Mueller About Flynn’s Alleged Turkish Scheme – NBC News
trump is under house arrest – Google Search
trump is under house arrest – Google Search
Talking Points Brought to Trump Tower Meeting Were Shared With Kremlin – The New York Times
The FBI and the IACP: Bound Together by Partnership, Friendship, and Commitment — FBI
Robert Mueller Russia inquiry: first charges have been filed – reports | US news | The Guardian
Новые антироссийские санкции «урановое дело» Клинтон – YouTube
trump investigations indictments 2017 – YouTube
trump investigations indictments 2017 – Google Search
trump investigations indictments 2017 – Google Search
News – Trump Investigations – Google Search
Former CIA Director James Woolsey – Google Search
James Woolsey and Mike Flynn – Google Search
R. James Woolsey Jr. – Wikipedia
9:52 AM 10/16/2017 – Cambridge Analytica, the shady data firm that might be a key Trump-Russia link, explained – Trump Investigations Report

Cyberspace, cyber control, cyber wars – 10.27 – 26.17

Articles

10.14.17 – How Russia used social media to divide Americans | US news | The Guardian
5.26.17 – Trump Campaign Used Social Media Manipulation, Says The Guardian | CleanTechnica
Scrutiny mounts for Trump digital operation | TheHill
10.11.17 – House Intel looking at Cambridge Analytica in Russia probe – Axios
Russia is pushing to control cyberspace. We should all be worried. – The Washington Post
Former CIA station chief warns of ‘authoritarian internet’ – YouTube
Russian Facebook ads made no difference in the election
How Facebook, Google and Twitter ’embeds’ helped Trump in 2016 – POLITICO
10.20.17 – Escalating Its Russia Probe, Senate Committee Follows The Money
Expert: Robert Mueller to drop the hammer on Donald Trump within weeks – Palmer Report
10.25.17 – Addressing Russian Influence: What Can We Learn From U.S. Cold War Counter-Propaganda Efforts? – Lawfare
The city getting rich from fake news – BBC News
Infighting plagues Senate Judiciary Committee’s Russia investigation – ABC News
11.15.16 – Trump won thanks to social media | TheHill
Here’s The Man Behind Donald Trump’s Bizarre Social Media Strategy | HuffPost
Donald Trump on social media – Wikipedia

Searches

Cambridge Analytica tried to reach out to WikiLeaks – Google Search
social media reps in trump campaign – Google Search
social media in trump campaign guardian – Google Search
SCL Group – Google Search
The E-Curtain And Control of The Cyberspace – Google Search
Cyberspace, cyber control, cyber wars – Google Search
Russia’s push to control cyberspace – Google Search
Russia’s push to control cyberspace – Google Search
The E-Curtain And Control of The Cyberspace – Google Search
The E-Curtain And Control of The Cyberspace – Google Search
Kislyak, SCL Group, Cambridge Analytica – Google Search
Cambridge Analytica software – Google Search
Cambridge Analytica and Brexit – Google Search
Cambridge Analytica, Trump, and Brexit – Google Search
Read the whole story
· · · · · · ·

A possible Russian role should in Brexit vote be checked out | Op-ed

1 Share

T he British are now looking into whether President Vladimir Putin’s Russia intervened in the United Kingdom’s June 2016 referendum on continued membership in the European Union. The “Brexit” won by about 52 percent, but it’s unclear whether Russian interference in the affair, through social media buys or other means, made a difference. Many people in Britain long have had reservations about integration and complaints about the EU, so the outcome did not come as a shot from the dark.

At the same time, Russia was in favor of Britain’s leaving the EU as a means of putting the cat among the pigeons for EU members, which include once-satellites of the former Soviet Union.

Russia has also interfered in recent elections in France, Germany and the United States. It has showed itself capable of weighing in both through media and through technological capacities in the field of communications, hacking into inner-party communications and, less clearly, voting mechanisms. This is troubling to the affected nations, but it must be kept in mind that governments the world over, including various U.S. administrations, have often tried to meddle in others’ internal affairs.

In the United States there are still underway investigations into the role of Russia in the 2016 elections. The most vigorous of these is led by special counsel and former FBI head Robert S. Mueller 3rd, but there are less reliable, more politicized inquiries being carried out by the Senate and House of Representatives Intelligence committees and the Senate Judiciary Committee. These risk being slow-rolled in spite of their importance due to possible links they are exploring between Trump campaign personnel and Russians.

Negotiations between British and EU representatives over Brexit, which still has the support of the British public, are giving the U.K.’s political leadership, including Prime Minister Theresa May, fits. One painful issue is how much the British will have to pay the EU, based on commitments it undertook during its membership, to get out. Another is the new situation in terms of rights of British citizens in remaining EU members and other EU member countries’ citizens in Britain.

Another knotty question is what the new, post-Brexit situation will be at the border between Ireland, which will remain an EU member, and Northern Ireland, part of the United Kingdom but a part whose population voted against Brexit. That border is now wide open. Its changed status, to the border between an EU member and a nonmember U.K., risks blowing up the famous 1998 Good Friday agreement that brought peace to Northern Ireland.

Another major problem in the evolving EU-British negotiations is that, given the shaky political situation inside and among the British political parties since the Conservatives lost May’s hastily called elections in June, EU countries and negotiators are not certain that the British government can deliver home approval on any agreement reached with them.

If nothing else, Putin has to be wringing his hands with glee at both the intra-British quarreling over Brexit and the tension occasioned by the negotiations over Brexit between the British and the rest of the Europeans — just as he must be smiling at the energy Americans continue to expend battling each other over Donald Trump’s election.

All of this plays into Russia’s hands and points up for Americans the necessity to get to the bottom of the mischief that Russia has been able so far to wreak in American politics, and the need to block it off before Americans go to the polls again.

Read the whole story
· · · ·

A possible Russian role should in Brexit vote be checked out – The Keene Sentinel

1 Share
A possible Russian role should in Brexit vote be checked out
The Keene Sentinel
T he British are now looking into whether President Vladimir Putin’s Russia intervened in the United Kingdom’s June 2016 referendum on continued membership in the European Union. The “Brexit” won by about 52 percent, but it’s unclear whether Russian …

and more »

7:17 AM 10/29/2017 – “How Much Did Trump Pay Cambridge Analytica?” M.N.: And who else paid them? 

1 Share
Latest Post on G+ Public RSS-Feed of Mike Nova. Created with the PIXELMECHANICS ‘GPlusRSS-Webtool’ at http://gplusrss.com 28.10.2017 21:45 Sat, 28 Oct 2017 21:45:59 +0200 Cambridge Analytica (GS) News-Review – 10.21 – 28.17 Previous Posts on Cambridge Analytica (Category) 10:31 AM 10/28/2017 How social media helped weaponize Donald Trump’s election campaign 28.10.2017 17:29 10:31 AM 10/28/2017 … Continue reading “7:17 AM 10/29/2017 – “How Much Did Trump Pay Cambridge Analytica?” M.N.: And who else paid them?”

FBI Probe Of Paul Manafort Focuses On 13 “Suspicious” Wire Transfers – BuzzFeed News

1 Share
FBI Probe Of Paul Manafort Focuses On 13 “Suspicious” Wire Transfers
BuzzFeed News
The FBI’s investigation of Donald Trump’s former campaign manager, Paul Manafort, includes a keen focus on a series of suspicious wire transfers in which offshore companies linked to Manafort moved more than $3 million all over the globe between 2012 …

US Pressure Delays Israel’s ‘Greater Jerusalem’ Bill: Legislator – U.S. News & World Report

1 Share

U.S. News & World Report
US Pressure Delays Israel’s ‘Greater Jerusalem’ Bill: Legislator
U.S. News & World Report
An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man walks on a road in the Israeli settlement of Beitar Illit in the occupied West Bank February 15, 2017. REUTERS/Amir Cohen Reuters. By Jeffrey Heller. JERUSALEM (Reuters) – U.S. pressure delayed an Israeli ministerial vote 
Under US pressure, Israel delays move to expand JerusalemABC News
Netanyahu rules out immunity law that affects ongoing probesThe Times of Israel
Netanyahu Won’t Support Law Curbing Police Probing of Sitting Prime MinisterThe Jewish Press – JewishPress.com
Haaretz –Arutz Sheva –Jewish Chronicle –Jewish News
all 35 news articles »
Next Page of Stories
Loading…
Page 4

28.10.2017 17:18

1 Share

28.10.2017 17:19

1 Share

28.10.2017 17:21

1 Share

28.10.2017 17:25

1 Share

28.10.2017 17:29

1 Share

28.10.2017 17:30

1 Share

Share this article
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •