5:19 PM 11/4/2017 – There’s a lot more there’: Mueller ups the stakes in Trump-Russia inquiry – The Guardian

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Trump Investigations Report | Latest Posts

Trump Investigations Report from mikenova (18 sites)
Trump – Google News: Trump, in Tweet, Urges US Listing for Saudi Aramco – New York Times
 


New York Times
Trump, in Tweet, Urges US Listing for Saudi Aramco
New York Times
But the New York Stock Exchange on Saturday gained an unusual public backer: President Trump. In a tweet, Mr. Trumpurged Saudi Arabia to pick the Big Board as the international venue for the initial public offering of Aramco. Important to the United …
Trump pitches Saudi Aramco to list IPO stock on the NYSE, calling it ‘important’ to the USCNBC
Trump pitches for $2 trillion Saudi Aramco oil floatBBC News
Trump urges Saudi Arabia to list state oil company on NY stock exchangePolitico
Fox News –Bloomberg
all 48 news articles »

Trump – Google News

Trump – from Huffington Post

Trump – from Huffington Post from mikenova (2 sites)
Donald Trump: George H.W. Bush Called Trump A ‘Blowhard’ And Said, ‘I Don’t Like Him’

The author of a new book on the Bush presidents revealed some of their true thoughts on Trump.

Donald Trump

Trump News Review

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)
trump under federal investigation – Google News: Furor erupts over city proposal to hire lobbyist with Trump ties – The Daily Post
Saved Stories – 1. Trump: Robert Mueller is targeting the Trump-Russia guy who could flip on Ivanka Trump and Donald Trump Jr
Saved Stories – 1. Trump: Brexit, the ministers, the professor and the spy: how Russia pulls strings in UK
Saved Stories – 1. Trump: Theres a lot more there: Mueller ups the stakes in Trump-Russia inquiry
Saved Stories – 1. Trump: ‘There’s a lot more there’: Mueller ups the stakes in Trump-Russia inquiry – The Guardian
Russia influence in Eastern Europe – Google News: Inside story: How Russians hacked the Democrats’ emails – OregonLive.com
Trumpism – Google News: The Last Thing You Will Need To Know About Trumpism & The Resistance – ChicagoNow (blog)
Trump – Google News: Trump, in Tweet, Urges US Listing for Saudi Aramco – New York Times
Trump’s and Putin’s connections with organized crime – Google News: ‘There’s a lot more there’: Mueller ups the stakes in Trump-Russia inquiry – The Guardian
Russian Intelligence services and international organized crime and terrorism – Google News: ‘There’s a lot more there’: Mueller ups the stakes in Trump-Russia inquiry – The Guardian
Russian Intelligence, organized crime and political interference – Google News: ‘There’s a lot more there’: Mueller ups the stakes in Trump-Russia inquiry – The Guardian
Trump and Russia – Google News: ‘There’s a lot more there’: Mueller ups the stakes in Trump-Russia inquiry – The Guardian
donald trump russia – Google News: ‘There’s a lot more there’: Mueller ups the stakes in Trump-Russia inquiry – The Guardian
trump and russia – Google News: ‘There’s a lot more there’: Mueller ups the stakes in Trump-Russia inquiry – The Guardian
trump russian candidate – Google News: ‘There’s a lot more there’: Mueller ups the stakes in Trump-Russia inquiry – The Guardian
Russian – International “Mafia” – organized crime – Google News: ‘There’s a lot more there’: Mueller ups the stakes in Trump-Russia inquiry – The Guardian
Donald Trump | The Guardian: Theres a lot more there: Mueller ups the stakes in Trump-Russia inquiry
Donald Trump | The Guardian: Brexit, the ministers, the professor and the spy: how Russia pulls strings in UK
Palmer Report: Robert Mueller is targeting the Trump-Russia guy who could flip on Ivanka Trump and Donald Trump Jr
Russian Intelligence services – Google News: Kaspersky Struck References to 67 ‘Tech Partners’ Like Amazon and Microsoft From Website – Fortune

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1.1K
  •  
  •  

3:29 PM 11/4/2017 – Papadopoulos Is The Big One,” Not Manafort, Ex CIA Director Michael Hayden Say

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Trump Investigations News Review

Trump Investigations from mikenova (20 sites)
1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites): Russia influence in Eastern Europe – Google News: US Policy Towards Iran’s Economic Reintegration – Modern Diplomacy
2016 Presidential Election Investigation – Google News: FBI Gives Senate Hillary Memos Over Comey’s Handling Of Clinton Email Investigation – Newsweek
1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites): Donald Trump | The Guardian: George HW Bush calls Trump a ‘blowhard’ in book The Last Republicans
1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites): Russian – International “Mafia” – organized crime – Google News: McMafia release date, cast, trailer: When will McMafia air on the BBC? – Express.co.uk
1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites): FBI politicization – Google News: Following Trump’s Lead, Republicans Grow Quiet on Guantánamo – New York Times
1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites): Trump – Google News: Trump visits Trump-branded Hawaii resort – Politico
1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites): Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: The Lawfare Podcast: Populisms Ancient and Modern with Mike Duncan
1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites): Rudy Giuliani – Google News: New Yorkers Can Now Put On Dancing Shoes And Legally Get ‘Footloose’ In Public Spaces – NPR
1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites): 1. Trump Circles: Elections from mikenova (16 sites): Rudy Giuliani – Google News: New Yorkers Can Now Put On Dancing Shoes And Legally Get ‘Footloose’ In Public Spaces – NPR
Trump Investigations – Google News: Prosecutor to Trump: Shut Up or Face Gag Order From Russia Probe Special Counsel – Newsweek
1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites): Trump Investigations – Google News: Prosecutor to Trump: Shut Up or Face Gag Order From Russia Probe Special Counsel – Newsweek
1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites): Sebastian Gorka – Google News: Seb Gorka Just Challenged Me to a Fight Over Email and I Accepted – Mediaite
1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites): Donald Trump: Donald Trump urges Saudi Aramco to list in New York

Papadopoulos Is “The Big One,” Not Manafort, Ex CIA Director Michael Hayden Says

1 Share

White House scandals have a way of turning nobodies into unfortunate somebodies. So it was 45 years ago in October with Donald Segretti, whom The Washington Post exposed as a major cog in a White House dirty tricks program to destroy Maine Senator Ed Muskie, the leading Democratic candidate for president. Segretti’s reported role added startling new context to what became known as the Watergate scandal. It showed that the June 1972 break-in of the Democratic National Committee was part of a much larger campaign of surveillance and sabotage against targets on President Richard Nixon’s “enemies list”—from reporters to liberal think tanks to dissident government officials like Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the Pentagon Papers.

Now comes George Papadopoulos, another nobody whose name could soon be memorialized on a Trivial Pursuit card for political scandals. The 30-year-old was yet another enabler in the Kremlin’s multipronged campaign to destroy Hillary Clinton, according to the grand jury indictment unsealed by special counsel Robert Mueller on October 30. Donald Trump once called Papadopoulos, his former foreign policy adviser, “an excellent guy,” but now dismisses him as “a low-level volunteer” and a “liar.”

Not so much, judging by his guilty plea. With that, Papadopoulos became just the latest name to surface in the widening list of Trump associates under scrutiny by the special counsel—including former campaign chair Paul Manafort and his business associate Rick Gates; Trump’s erstwhile national security adviser Michael Flynn; and oil consultant and Trump foreign policy adviser Carter Page (who met with Russians close to President Vladimir Putin, according to the controversial dossiercompiled by former British intelligence officer Christopher Steele). Page has denied any collusion with Kremlin figures and said he has nothing to fear from Mueller’s probe. Manafort and Gates pleaded not guilty after they were arrested on money-laundering and other charges a few hours before the Papadopoulos indictment and plea deal were unsealed.

Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now

Former FBI Director Robert Mueller (front), the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election, leaves the Capitol building after meeting with the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill. Robert Mueller meets with Senate Judiciary Committee, Washington DC, USA – 21 Jun 2017 Xinhua/REX/Shutterstock

“The big one is the Papadopoulos thing,” former CIA and National Security Agency Director Michael Hayden told me hours after the Manafort-Gates arraignments, following a Washington, D.C., panel he led on “Truth Tellers in the Bunker,” a reference to both the media and intelligence agencies that have reported on Russian interference in the 2016 election.

For Hayden, the Papadopoulos indictment underscored yet again how eager Team Trump was to collude with the Kremlin when its emissaries came bearing gifts of Clinton “dirt.” Over the past year, Trump and his associates had repeatedly dismissed such interactions and their failures to report them as mere oversights. Before Papadopoulos, the most damning case had been a meeting between Donald Trump Jr., Jared Kushner, Manafort and a Kremlin-connected lawyer, Natalia Veselnitskaya. The meeting occurred after an intermediary promised Trump Jr. documents that “would incriminate Hillary and her dealings with Russia.” (“If it’s what you say,” Trump Jr. replied, “I love it.”) At first, Trump Jr. denied a report of the meeting. Later, he insisted that “no details or supporting information was provided or even offered.”

Likewise, top Trump campaign aide and current U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions told Congress under oath in June that he had “no knowledge” of any conversations by anyone connected to Team Trump about “any type of [Russian] interference with any campaign.” Later, The Washington Postreported that Sessions had failed to disclose two contacts with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak during the presidential race. Four days after the Papadopoulos plea deal surfaced, NBC reported that Sessions and Trump had both heard out a proposal from their young foreign policy adviser in March 2016 to use his “Russian contacts” to try to set up a meeting between the candidate and Putin. Sessions “rejected” the idea, NBC said. “Trump didn’t say yes and he didn’t say no,” CNN reported, citing “a person in the room” during the meeting. Asked about that as he prepared to leave for his Asia swing on November 3, Trump told reporters he “didn’t remember much” about the meeting, which he called “unimportant.”

Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) is sworn in before the Senate Judiciary Committee during his confirmation hearing to be the U.S. attorney general January 10, 2017 in Washington, DC. Sessions was one of the first members of Congress to endorse and support President-elect Donald Trump, who nominated him for Attorney General. Chip Somodevilla/Getty

Mueller may yet get a chance to refresh the president’s memory. He has Papadopoulos’s sworn statements that a Trump campaign official encouraged him to pursue Russian “dirt.” That person was unnamed in the Papadopoulos indictment but soon outed by The Washington Post as Sam Clovis, a former conservative talk radio host and co-chair of the 2016 Trump campaign. A self-proclaimed former “Russia expert while serving in the United States military in the Pentagon,” Clovis withdrew his name from consideration for a top Agriculture Department post after his conversations with Papadopoulos were revealed.

Instead of recognizing the Russian offers as a classic enemy intelligence ploy—and calling the FBI—Trump’s minions welcomed alleged Kremlin agents into their inner circle. “How stupid can you be?” Hayden said of the campaign’s actions.

George Papadopoulos and Dr. Michael Katehakis- Distinguished Professor and Department Chair, Management Science & Information Systems at Rutgers University, on Sunday, November 6, 2016 at a pre-election meeting at the Stathakion Center in Astoria, NY. Εθνικός Κήρυξ/The National Herald/Kosta Bej

Getting access to Team Trump was a big score for Putin, an ex-KGB officer, says former CIA officer Jason Matthews, who served in Moscow and did battle with its secret agents for decades. “Just like the meeting with Donald Trump Jr. and the female Russian lawyer, the goal of these encounters was simply contact,” he explains in an email. “Of course, there was an element of baiting”—the Russians offered “thousands” of Clinton emails to Papadopoulos—“but Kremlin expectations for such meetings were modest. They just wanted to assess young, inexperienced green sticks like the Trump boys, Jared Kushner and Papadopoulos. The name of the game is assessment and looking for an opening.”

Matthews, now a spy novelist, says the Russians didn’t expect to damage Clinton enough to tilt the election to Trump. “They simply wanted to put a turd in the punch bowl” by getting private audiences with associates of the New York real estate mogul. All the better for the Russians that their discreet meetings with Trump’s people, who failed to report them on their security-clearance forms, were leaked to the press. Emails showing the supposedly neutral Democratic National Committee favoring Clintonover Senator Bernie Sanders, stolen by Russian hackers and published by WikiLeaks, sowed further disenchantment with American politics. Reports of Kremlin agents messing with voters’ heads via Facebook in Michigan, Wisconsin and elsewhere added yet another layer of distrust in the system. And now comes evidence that the Kremlin’s manipulation of Facebook, Twitter and other social media platforms was far faster than previously known.

Carter Page, former foreign policy adviser for the Trump campaign, speaks to the media after testifying before the House Intelligence Committee on November 2, 2017 in Washington, DC. The committee is conducting an investigation into Russia’s tampering in the 2016 election. Mark Wilson/Getty

“It’s the greatest covert influence program in history,” Hayden said. “If their goal was to make our society more dysfunctional, to exploit the dysfunction in American society, they succeeded.” If their goal was “to foster the notion that there are fundamentally no differences between their system and our system, they succeeded.”

But Putin’s influence campaign backfired in other ways, Hayden told me. “If their plan was to get someone into office who would warm relations between us and Moscow, that was a disaster.” The scandal not only handcuffed Trump from acting on his oft-stated desire to have closer relations with Moscow, but also prompted Congress to pass more sanctions against Russia and some of its leading officials and businessmen. Seen from that angle, Putin’s triumph looks self-defeating, says Nina Khrushcheva, a professor of international relations at the New School in New York City and the great-granddaughter of former Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev. “I am not sure he is a big winner, actually—maybe in a small, tactical way,” she says. “It was a dream of all Soviets before him—to embarrass and undermine the U.S., so he proved his point.”

To Putin and his circle, “Russia’s relationship with the West is a zero-sum game,” the Russian-born journalist Leonid Bershidsky observed earlier this year. If America is succeeding, then Russia must be losing. Thus, Putin has tried to stoke political disarray in the United States with a variety of ploys, ranging from compromising Trump’s aides with Kremlin meetings to flooding Facebook and Twitter with fake news fanning racial divisions.

In this photo provided by the German Government Press Office (BPA) Donald Trump, President of the USA (left), meets Vladimir Putin, President of Russia (right), at the opening of the G20 summit on July 7, 2017 in Hamburg, Germany. The G20 group of nations are meeting July 7-8 and major topics will include climate change and migration Steffen Kugler /BPA/Getty

But he may come to regret it, Khrushcheva argues. “He needs U.S. power. He needs cooperation in so many areas across the globe,” she says. “[Putin] can’t possibly think that taking down the U.S. fully is good for him or the world.” ”

That’s why Papadopoulos, a 2009 college graduate who listed his participation with the Model U.N. as foreign policy experience on his résumé, may pose a threat to both Russia and Trump. His cooperation with the feds—perhaps for several months—gave Mueller a pipeline into much of what Trump and his advisers were saying and doing about the Russians in private.

A hint of those conversations has already emerged, in the form of an email Papadopoulos sent to his Kremlin-linked contact in July, which Bloomberg News discovered in an FBI affidavit supporting the charges against the young man. Papadopoulos wrote that a meeting between “my national chairman and maybe one other foreign policy adviser” with the Russians “has been approved by our side.” Manafort was not named in the email, but he was Trump’s national campaign chairman at the time. The candidate’s top foreign policy advisers then were Sessions and Flynn, the former Defense Intelligence Agency chief who had developed ties with Moscow’s ambassador to the U.S. and its state-backed Russia Today TV channel.

Richard Gates arrives at the Prettyman Federal Court Building for a hearing November 2, 2017 in Washington, DC. Gates and former business partner and former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort both pleaded not guilty Monday to a 12-charge indictment that included money laundering and conspiracy. Chip Somodevilla/Getty

It’s unclear if Papadopoulos’s account in that email was correct, but his cooperation with the feds appears to incinerate over a year’s worth of assertions by the president that he had “nothing to do with the Russians.”

“Indeed, when the history books are written on the Trump-Russia investigation, it’s quite likely that the plea deal between special counsel Robert Mueller and…George Papadopoulos may be seen as the crucial moment,” Boston Globe columnist Michael Cohen wrote. “This is the first piece of [official] evidence that there was an ongoing effort within the Trump campaign to collude with the Russian government.”

That Trump’s associates were so careless in meeting with agents of a hostile power astonishes Hayden, who called it national security “malpractice.” Papadopoulos’s engagement with Kremlin emissaries was, “at best, reckless,” says a former CIA Russia analyst, who asked for anonymity in exchange for discussing such a sensitive issue. The young, inexperienced player “didn’t realize how potentially dangerous this situation was, both in a counterintelligence sense and in the sense of political optics back in the United States,” says the analyst, a longtime student of the espionage wars between Moscow and Washington.

Papadopoulos at first lied to FBI agents about his Russia contacts—another amateur move, which resulted in his indictment. But now that he’s talking, he likely won’t do much time. In that, he’s very much like Segretti, the Nixon trickster who ended up serving four months of a six-month sentence after he pleaded guilty to three charges of distributing illegal campaign literature.

In the mid-1990s, Segretti, a lawyer, ran for a judgeship in Orange County, California, where his Watergate notoriety trailed him. “The reaction to his candidacy was so negative that he decided to drop out,” the Los Angeles Times reported.

The only thing people “wanted to talk about,” Segretti told the paper, “was Nixon and Watergate.”

So it will likely go for George Papadopoulos. Only three weeks ago, the young man was looking for “a prominent publisher” on his LinkedIn page. As it turned out, however, he’d already told his story to the feds. One possible title? “Dupe.”

Read the whole story
· · · · · · · ·

McConnell: No need to pass bills to protect Mueller – Politico

1 Share

Politico
McConnell: No need to pass bills to protect Mueller
Politico
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said on Saturday that special counsel Robert Mueller is not in need of congressional protection from President Donald Trump. “I don’t hear much pressure to pass anything,” McConnell told MSNBC’s Hugh Hewitt.
McConnell: ‘I don’t hear much pressure’ to pass bill protecting Mueller from TrumpThe Hill
McConnell says Congress doesn’t need to pass legislation to protect MuellerBusiness Insider
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said tech should cooperate with law enforcement — and help the US fight …Recode
Breitbart News –The Week Magazine –Washington Examiner
all 15 news articles »

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1.1K
  •  
  •  

7:59 AM 11/4/2017 – Nadya Tolokonnikova also explained how she thinks Trump plays into Putin’s hands

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Trump – from Huffington Post

Trump – from Huffington Post from mikenova (2 sites)
Donald Trump: Pussy Riot Star Breaks Down Why Trump And Putin Are Pretty Much The Same

Nadya Tolokonnikova also explained how she thinks Trump plays into Putin’s hands.

Donald Trump

Trump – Current News Articles In Brief 

» trump as danger to National Security – Google News: Week 24: ‘The Coffee Boy’ Spills It In Trump’s Lap – Politico
04/11/17 07:19 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Politico Week 24: ‘The Coffee Boy’ Spills It In Trump’s Lap Politico As a cooperating witness in the Mueller probe, the hapless and unaccomplished Papadopoulos may deliver doofus danger to the Trump : Depending on what he heard and saw i…

» Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: The Week That Was: All of Lawfare in One Post
04/11/17 07:13 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
What a week it was. Last Friday, CNN reported that Special Counsel Robert Mueller had filed the first indictments in the Russia investigation—though it did not name either the targets or the charges. Susan Hennessey and Benjamin Wittes e…

» trump electorate – Google News: Virginia is a big electoral test for the anti-Trump movement. Here’s what they think they’ll win. – Mic
04/11/17 07:01 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Mic Virginia is a big electoral test for the anti- Trump movement. Here’s what they think they’ll win. Mic Still, the pressure will be on for Democrats to deliver converting historically low approval ratings of Trump and grassroots energ…

» trump as samson – Google News: Traveling busker Dylan Sylvester, originally from North Battleford, Saskatchewan, has had a break from his nomadic … – TheChronicleHerald.ca
04/11/17 06:56 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
TheChronicleHerald.ca Traveling busker Dylan Sylvester, originally from North Battleford, Saskatchewan, has had a break from his nomadic … TheChronicleHerald.ca Seabin project’s CEO and Co-Founder Pete Ceglinski demonstrates the device…

» Putin and the Mob – Google News: Russian City Warns Environmental Activists Not To Greet Putin In Gas Masks – RadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty
04/11/17 06:38 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
RadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty Russian City Warns Environmental Activists Not To Greet Putin In Gas Masks RadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty The statement followed online discussions by local residents about staging a flash mob next week during …

» Donald Trump: Experts Urge Trump: ‘Stick To The Script’ In Asia, Don’t Provoke North Korea
04/11/17 06:00 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Washington and Pyongyang have engaged in an escalating war of words. Donald Trump

» trump as gambler – Google News: Las Vegas shooting: Police say gambling losses may have played role in massacre – The Australian
04/11/17 05:45 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
The Australian Las Vegas shooting: Police say gambling losses may have played role in massacre The Australian Gunman Stephen Paddock, a 64-year-old high-stakes gambler and real estate investor, had lost a “significant amount of wealth” s…

» Anthony Weiner – Google News: Anthony Weiner to report to prison by Monday – ABC News – ABC News
04/11/17 05:42 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Business Insider Anthony Weiner to report to prison by Monday – ABC News ABC News Former Democratic congressman Anthony Weiner, who was sentenced to 21 to 27 months in prison for sending obscene material to a 15-year-old North … A…

» Donald Trump – Google News: ‘The Simpsons’ Trolls Donald Trump With Message For San Juan Mayor – HuffPost
04/11/17 05:16 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
HuffPost ‘The Simpsons’ Trolls Donald Trump With Message For San Juan Mayor HuffPost He also zinged President Donald Trump . Addressing San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz, Moe said he knew how it feels “when somebody comes and throws paper…

» trump is politically immature – Google News: In foreign relations, Trump shifts rhetoric but policy largely unchanged – National Catholic Reporter
04/11/17 05:14 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
National Catholic Reporter In foreign relations, Trump shifts rhetoric but policy largely unchanged National Catholic Reporter Perhaps the most prominent — and potentially dangerous — foreign policy issue to arise in the first year of Pr…

» Donald Trump: ‘The Simpsons’ Trolls Donald Trump With Message For San Juan Mayor
04/11/17 05:06 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
“I personally know how it feels when somebody comes and throws paper towels at you.” Donald Trump

» putin won US 2016 election – Google News: Putin’s trolls targeted America, not Hillary – New York Post
04/11/17 05:01 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
New York Post Putin’s trolls targeted America, not Hillary New York Post “We assess Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered an influence campaign in 2016 aimed at the US presidential election ,” the assessment released in January stated…

» trump and putin – Google News: Putin’s trolls targeted America, not Hillary – New York Post
04/11/17 05:01 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
New York Post Putin’s trolls targeted America, not Hillary New York Post The Facebook ads placed by a Russian troll farm and released Wednesday show the Russian propaganda campaign of 2016 didn’t favor either Donald Trump or Hillary Clin…

» trump as samson – Google News: Busker with a van – TheChronicleHerald.ca
04/11/17 04:56 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
TheChronicleHerald.ca Busker with a van TheChronicleHerald.ca Traveling busker Dylan Sylvester, originally from North Battleford, Saskatchewan, has had a break from his nomadic life as he spends time in Antigonish. The 1979 Dodge van, du…

» donald trump racketeering – Google News: Your Sentencing Advice Isn’t Helpful, Mr. President – National Review
04/11/17 04:46 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
National Review Your Sentencing Advice Isn’t Helpful, Mr. President National Review Trump , or at least someone at the White House, must have known that the defense had already moved to get the case thrown out on the theory that Trump ha…

» trump under federal investigation – Google News: Your Sentencing Advice Isn’t Helpful, Mr. President – National Review
04/11/17 04:46 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
National Review Your Sentencing Advice Isn’t Helpful, Mr. President National Review While legally meritless, the political heat from cries that Trump was tampering with an investigation led inexorably to the appointment of a special coun…

» roger stone – Google News: Twitter worker shuts down Trump’s account – Arkansas Online
04/11/17 04:41 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Arkansas Online Twitter worker shuts down Trump’s account Arkansas Online Just days earlier, the company had shut down the personal account of a close Trump ally, Roger Stone , after a profanity-laced tirade insulting journalists. Stone …

» 1. Trump Circles: Elections from mikenova (16 sites): roger stone – Google News: Twitter worker shuts down Trump’s account – Arkansas Online
04/11/17 04:41 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Arkansas Online Twitter worker shuts down Trump’s account Arkansas Online Just days earlier, the company had shut down the personal account of a close Trump ally, Roger Stone , after a profanity-laced tirade insulting journalists. Stone …

» crime and terror link – Google News: Akshardham terror attack accused arrested in Ahmedabad – Times of India
04/11/17 04:37 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Times of India Akshardham terror attack accused arrested in Ahmedabad Times of India NEW DELHI: The Ahmedabad crime branch on Saturday arrested Ajmeri Abdul Rashid, a key accused in the sensational Akshardham temple terror attack case. A…

» crime and terror – Google News: Akshardham terror attack accused arrested in Ahmedabad – Times of India
04/11/17 04:37 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Times of India Akshardham terror attack accused arrested in Ahmedabad Times of India NEW DELHI: The Ahmedabad crime branch on Saturday arrested Ajmeri Abdul Rashid, a key accused in the sensational Akshardham temple terror attack case. A…

» Trump demands victory to be handed to him – Google News: The joke’s over – how Boris Johnson is damaging Britain’s global stature – New Statesman
04/11/17 04:14 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
The joke’s over – how Boris Johnson is damaging Britain’s global stature New Statesman Dressed in a dark suit and looking – for him – quite smart, the Foreign Secretary stood at the lectern and recalled how the Poles had helped Britain f…

» Donald Trump: Stephen Colbert Amusingly Imagines John Kelly’s Itinerary On Trump’s Asia Trip
04/11/17 04:08 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
“Explain that real pandas don’t know Kung Fu.” Donald Trump

» Donald Trump | The Guardian: Is it too late to save the world? Jonathan Franzen on one year of Trump’s America
04/11/17 04:06 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
‘As the ice shelves crumble and the Twitter president threatens to pull out of the Paris accord’, Franzen reflects on the role of the writer in times of crisis If an essay is something essayed – something hazarded, not definitive, not au…

» Trump demands victory to be handed to him – Google News: Is it too late to save the world? Jonathan Franzen on one year of Trump’s America – The Guardian
04/11/17 04:06 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
The Guardian Is it too late to save the world? Jonathan Franzen on one year of Trump’s America The Guardian And so I went to work on the essay, every day combusting half a dozen low-tar cigarettes in front of a box fan in my living-room …

» trump anxiety – Google News: ‘Every day brings some new trauma’: keeping calm in an anxious world – The Guardian
04/11/17 04:00 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
The Guardian ‘Every day brings some new trauma’: keeping calm in an anxious world The Guardian By extension, persuading other people to feel worried feels like getting them involved productively as well. “ Anxiety is conductive,” the des…

» Donald Trump | The Guardian: ‘Every day brings some new trauma’: keeping calm in an anxious world
04/11/17 04:00 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
From Trump’s tweets to EU uncertainty and the threat of nuclear war, the stress-inducing headlines keep coming. Therapists share tips on how to cope In the immediate aftermath of the EU referendum and the US presidential election , it be…

» Donald Trump: Bill Maher ‘Reveals’ What Donald Trump Will Really Be Doing On His Asia Trip
04/11/17 03:44 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
“China is the big one, he wants to study their wall,” he joked. Donald Trump

» Russian Intelligence services and organized crime – Google News: How Russian hackers pried into Clinton campaign emails – Los Angeles Times
04/11/17 03:06 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
How Russian hackers pried into Clinton campaign emails Los Angeles Times While U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that Russia was behind the email thefts, the AP drew on forensic data to report Thursday that the hackers known as F…

» Donald Trump: Trump’s backing counts little for coal lobbyists
04/11/17 03:00 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
US president’s bailout is meeting resistance from unexpected sources, says John Dizard Donald Trump

» Trump – Google News: Trump proves an eager tourist in Hawaii, but protesters have ‘no aloha for him’ – Washington Post
04/11/17 02:53 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Washington Post Trump proves an eager tourist in Hawaii, but protesters have ‘no aloha for him’ Washington Post HONOLULU — President Trump — a creature of habit most comfortable when ensconced in his Trump -branded world — proved himself…

» Abedin – Google News: The Hackers’ Democratic targets – Washington Post
04/11/17 02:53 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Washington Post The Hackers’ Democratic targets Washington Post HUMA ABEDIN . Vice chairwoman of Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign; longtime aide to Clinton when she was first lady, senator and secretary of state. The sexting scandals of A…

» Abedin – Google News: The Hackers’ Democratic targets – Sacramento Bee
04/11/17 02:32 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Sacramento Bee The Hackers’ Democratic targets Sacramento Bee HUMA ABEDIN . Vice chairwoman of Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign; longtime aide to Clinton when she was first lady, senator and secretary of state. The sexting scandals of Abe…

» Palmer Report: Ivanka Trump’s nightmare trip from hell
04/11/17 02:31 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Ivanka Trump’s life has gone to hell this week. Thanks to the arrests and dominoes that started to fall this week, her father Donald Trump is probably going to prison. Her husband Jared Kushner is also probably going to prison. Her…

» Elections 2016 Investigation – Google News: Sessions gets more criticism from Trump, Russia questions – Brownsville Herald
04/11/17 02:29 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Brownsville Herald Sessions gets more criticism from Trump, Russia questions Brownsville Herald The aides said the tweets were a media savvy way to deflect attention from the investigation by special counsel Robert Mueller into Russian m…

» Anthony Weiner – Google News: The Hackers’ Democratic targets – WTOP
04/11/17 02:27 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
WTOP The Hackers’ Democratic targets WTOP The sexting scandals of Abedin’s husband, former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner , hurt the Democratic Party and Clinton’s campaign. JENNIFER PALMIERI. Communications director for Hillary Clinton’s 2016…

» trump narcissist – Google News: Great article, but it was in the wrong place – Arkansas Online
04/11/17 02:02 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Great article, but it was in the wrong place Arkansas Online The alarming consensus of these professionals is that President Donald Trump is a malignant narcissist (described as “the quintessence of evil” by Eric Fromm, 1964) w…

» putin and trump – Google News: How Putin and Trump have eroded truth and rule of law – Irish Times
04/11/17 01:30 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Irish Times How Putin and Trump have eroded truth and rule of law Irish Times Does Donald Trump pose a threat to democracy? Timothy Snyder says yes. In February, a few weeks after the presidential inauguration, the Yale historian publish…

» Putin Trump – Google News: How Putin and Trump have eroded truth and rule of law – Irish Times
04/11/17 01:30 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Irish Times How Putin and Trump have eroded truth and rule of law Irish Times Does Donald Trump pose a threat to democracy? Timothy Snyder says yes. In February, a few weeks after the presidential inauguration, the Yale historian publish…

» 1. Trump Circles: Elections from mikenova (16 sites): Putin Trump – Google News: How Putin and Trump have eroded truth and rule of law – Irish Times
04/11/17 01:30 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Irish Times How Putin and Trump have eroded truth and rule of law Irish Times Does Donald Trump pose a threat to democracy? Timothy Snyder says yes. In February, a few weeks after the presidential inauguration, the Yale historian publish…

» Donald Trump | The Guardian: Tracking Trump: a storm for Manafort, and a volley of post-attack tweets
04/11/17 01:00 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Trump’s ex-campaign chair appeared in court charged with money laundering, while after eight people died in New York, Trump was quick to speak out Each week Trump seems to make more news than most presidents do in a lifetime. The Guardia…

» Abedin has to resign – Google News: Anthony Weiner ordered to report to prison by Monday – Business Insider UK
04/11/17 00:50 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Business Insider UK Anthony Weiner ordered to report to prison by Monday Business Insider UK Weiner admitted to the act but said that he and Huma Abedin , his wife and aide to Hillary Clinton, were moving forward. After more photos of se…

» trump anxiety – Google News: Trump, Abe friendship remains on par – CNN
04/11/17 00:47 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
CNN Trump , Abe friendship remains on par CNN This weekend, President Donald Trump and his Japanese counterpart, Shinzo Abe, bring their bromance to Japan, the first stop on Trump’s maiden swing through Asia that comes as anxiety over No…

» FBI politicization – Google News: Trump breaches boundaries by saying DOJ, FBI should be ‘going after’ Democrats – Chicago Tribune
04/11/17 00:30 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Chicago Tribune Trump breaches boundaries by saying DOJ, FBI should be ‘going after’ Democrats Chicago Tribune … Trump on Friday repeatedly called on the Justice Department and FBI to investigate his Democratic political opponents, a b…

» trump investigated by the fbi – Google News: Trump breaches boundaries by saying DOJ, FBI should be ‘going after’ Democrats – Orlando Sentinel
04/11/17 00:30 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
Trump breaches boundaries by saying DOJ, FBI should be ‘going after’ Democrats Orlando Sentinel President Donald Trump on Friday repeatedly called on the Justice Department and FBI to investigate his Democratic political opponents, a bre…

» Russian Intelligence services and international organized crime and terrorism – Google News: The prosecutor for an international war crimes tribunal wants an investigation of potential offenses in Afghanistan. – WTHR
04/11/17 00:25 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
U.S. News & World Report The prosecutor for an international war crimes tribunal wants an investigation of potential offenses in Afghanistan. WTHR U.S. intelligence officials and prosecutors have long said Iran formed loose ties to the t…

» Trump, Putin, and the Mob – Google News: KASS: Putin’s great American spy novel – MyWebTimes.com
04/11/17 00:24 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
MyWebTimes.com KASS: Putin’s great American spy novel MyWebTimes.com Yet with this ongoing Russian business, he couldn’t have a more compelling American political drama to enjoy if he’d written it all by himself: the anti- Trump liberal …

» Putin and the Mob – Google News: KASS: Putin’s great American spy novel – MyWebTimes.com
04/11/17 00:24 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
MyWebTimes.com KASS: Putin’s great American spy novel MyWebTimes.com And Manafort will be squeezed the way the feds have always squeezed people, from mob bosses to politicians. Their wealth will be squeezed, and their friends and family …

» trump as putin’s puppet – Google News: KASS: Putin’s great American spy novel – MyWebTimes.com
04/11/17 00:24 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
MyWebTimes.com KASS: Putin’s great American spy novel MyWebTimes.com Yet with this ongoing Russian business, he couldn’t have a more compelling American political drama to enjoy if he’d written it all by himself: the anti- Trump liberal …

» Rudy Giuliani – Google News: NYC repeals 91-year-old law barring dancing in bars – The Philadelphia Tribune
04/11/17 00:15 from 1. Trump from mikenova (5 sites)
The Philadelphia Tribune NYC repeals 91-year-old law barring dancing in bars The Philadelphia Tribune Former Mayor Rudy Giuliani used the law to crack down on rowdy nightclubs as part of a quality-of-life campaign 20 years ago. Enforceme…


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1.1K
  •  
  •  

7:18 AM 11/4/2017 – The Sleazy Case Against Muellers Probe – NYT

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Source: The Sleazy Case Against Mueller’s Probe – The New York Times

Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks

The Sleazy Case Against Muellers Probe

Donald Trump has two Hail Mary plays left fire Mueller, or start war with North Korea: Burman
China Disputes Trump’s Claims Of Fentanyl ‘Flood’ Into United States
Donald Trump has two Hail Mary plays left fire Mueller, or start war with North Korea: Burman – Toronto Star
What Donald Trump Thinks It Takes to Be a Man – New York Times
Presidents of France and Russia Tackle Issues on Syria and Iran – Prensa Latina
US Lobbyists Missed Red Flags in Manafort-linked Contracts
Parliament Asks Twitter About Russian Meddling in Brexit Vote
Voice of America: US Lobbyists Missed Red Flags in Manafort-linked Contracts
golosamerikius’s YouTube Videos: «Старик Мюллер не подкачал»
Anthony Weiner – Google News: Anthony Weiner expected to surrender himself over to authorities this weekend to serve 21-month sentence for … – Daily Mail
In Donald Trump’s world, the buck stops over there | Opinion
How Will Putin Play Trumps Russia Investigation Narrative?
Conservatives introduce measure demanding Mueller’s resignation – Politico
Elections 2016 Investigation – Google News: US Republicans seek special counsel’s removal from Russia probe – Reuters
calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News: US Republicans seek special counsel’s removal from Russia probe – Reuters
putin won US 2016 election – Google News: How Will Putin Play Trump’s Russia Investigation Narrative? – Newsweek
Uzbekistan: Where the New York Terror Suspect Was Radicalized
Is Jared Kushner next to be indicted in Russia investigation? – Metro US
trump criminal investigation – Google News: Russia, Trump, and the 2016 US Election – Council on Foreign Relations
Cyprus Gave Manafort’s Bank Records to Mueller Team, Sources Say – Bloomberg
Russian trolls exploit social media to stir racial chaos – The Philadelphia Tribune
Mueller Reveals New Manafort Link to Organized Crime
The Early Edition: November 3, 2017
Today’s Headlines and Commentary

 

Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks
The Sleazy Case Against Muellers Probe
 

mikenova shared this story .

“Well before any public knowledge of these events,” Sipher notes, Steele’s report “identified multiple elements of the Russian operation including a cyber campaign, leaked documents related to Hillary Clinton, and meetings with Paul Manafort and other Trump affiliates to discuss the receipt of stolen documents. Mr. Steele could not have known that the Russians stole information on Hillary Clinton, or that they were considering means to weaponize them in the U.S. election, all of which turned out to be stunningly accurate.”

(After this column went to print, The Times reported that Trump foreign-policy adviser Carter Page met with Russian government officials in a July 2016 trip to Moscow, something he has long denied. This further confirms another claim made in the Steele dossier.)

There’s more of this, but you get the point: The suggestion that the Steele dossier has been discredited is discreditable to the point of being dishonest.

This brings us to the second anti-Mueller contention, which is that his indictment of former campaign chairman Paul Manafort for tax fraud connected to his political work in Ukraine, along with news of the guilty plea entered by Trump foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos for lying to the F.B.I., is merely evidence of the slimness of the special counsel’s case.

The nonchalance about Manafort’s illicit ties to pro-Russian politicians in Ukraine is almost funny, coming from the same people who went berserk over China’s alleged meddling on behalf of Democrats in the 1996 presidential campaign.

But if nothing else, the Manafort indictment underscores the Trump campaign’s astonishing vulnerability to Russian blackmail.

Did that vulnerability explain the campaign’s bizarre intervention (denied by Manafort) to soften the Republican Party platform’s language on providing help to Ukraine?

Why did the campaign pursue a course of semi-secret outreach to Russia through George Papadopoulos, giving him just enough visibility to let the Russians know he was a player but not so much visibility as to attract much media attention?

What else about Trump’s obsequious overtures to the Kremlin might similarly be explained by the contents of the Steele dossier?

These questions require answers, which is what makes calls to remove Mueller from his job or have Trump pardon Manafort, Papadopoulos and even himself both strange and repugnant. Since when did conservatives suddenly become conveniently bored with getting to the bottom of Russian conspiracies?

As it turns out, they’re not bored. They just want the conspiracies to involve liberals.

Thus the third Trumpian claim: That the real scandal is that the Clinton campaign and Democratic National Committee paid for the Steele dossier. Somehow that’s supposed to add up to “collusion” between Clinton and the Russians, on the remarkable theory that Steele was merely retailing Kremlin-invented fables about Trump.

Yet how else was Steele supposed to investigate allegations of Russia’s ties to the Trump campaign except by talking to Russian sources with insight into the Kremlin? If Clinton was the beneficiary of the Kremlin’s designs, why did it leak her emails? And why would Putin favor the candidate most hostile to him in last year’s election but undermine the one who kept offering improved relations?

You already know the answers. The deeper mystery is why certain conservatives who were once Trump’s fiercest critics have become his most sophistical apologists. The answer to that one requires a mode of analysis more psychological than political.

Continue reading the main story

Donald Trump has two Hail Mary plays left fire Mueller, or start war with North Korea: Burman
 

mikenova shared this story from TORONTO STAR | NEWS | WORLD.

Feeling cornered and under siege, an angry Donald Trump has embarked on a crucial trip to Asia, the longest foreign tour of his imploding presidency.

Increasingly, Trump is acting like a man who sees only two ways to survive. Given that, the only remaining question for him in his desperation may be this: “What should I do first?”

Will he fire Robert Mueller as the special counsel investigating Trump’s ties to Russia, which now seems only a matter of time, even though it is certain to trigger a constitutional crisis?

Or will he first try to regain popular support by risking a catastrophic nuclear war with North Korea, now closer than ever in the absence of any genuine diplomacy happening, even though it would inevitably result in hundreds of thousands of casualties?

This is a dangerous period in the turbulent Trump presidency, and for the world.

When the history books are written about this era, it is hard not to conclude that this week’s developments will loom large. This was the week we learned the first strong indications that — to put it in Trump’s vernacular — the jig is up.

The announcement from the Mueller team last Monday was a bombshell. Two senior Trump campaign officials have been indicted and a third Trump adviser has pleaded guilty. The 12-count indictmentlaid out the first charges in Mueller’s investigation into Russian efforts to interfere with last year’s U.S. election — including the headline charge of “conspiracy against the United States.”

Read more: Trump talks like a strongman. Good thing he’s governing like a weak man: Analysis

YOU MIGHT BE INTERESTED IN

YOU MIGHT BE INTERESTED IN

Even as a tiny fraction of what the Mueller team now undoubtedly knows, the court filings drew a staggering portrait of how Trump’s world operated last year. It revealed how Russian intelligence successfully penetrated Trump’s campaign operation at different levels.

For several months, including during the Republican convention of last summer, Trump’s campaign was run by Paul Manafort, who operated in secret as a foreign agent of a regime friendly to Russia’s Vladimir Putin. Before Manafort joined Trump in an official capacity, the charges indicate he laundered tens of millions of dollars for the Ukrainian strongman Viktor Yanukovych.

Perhaps even more ominous for Trump is the unexpected guilty plea of former campaign foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos — once described by Trump in an interview with The Washington Post as an “excellent guy.” Papadopoulos admitted to lying to the FBI about his attempts to set up meetings with Kremlin contacts in search of “dirt” on Hillary Clinton.

This week’s developments, as an opening volley from the Mueller team, provide an indication of what their strategy is. They are pressuring Manafort to co-operate and reveal what he knows about Trump’s role. They have already done a deal with Papadopoulos to tell them what he knows about who else was involved.

As Trump himself must know, it is widely accepted that Mueller has Trump’s tax returns in his possession. This means that Mueller’s team is able to pull together a complete picture of Trump’s financial relationship with Russians — including the years well before he announced for the presidency.

There have been numerous reports that Trump and his associates have been heavily financed by Russian oligarchs and mobsters, including those involved in money laundering, extortion, drugs and racketeering. If so, this would help explain why Trump has been so obsessively reluctant to be critical of Putin or of Russia since being elected president.

More than anyone, Trump would know the extent of his involvement with Russia — although Mueller, by now, may be a close second. Therein lies the danger for Trump. He knows that Mueller has the potential to destroying his presidency.

So — if you’re Trump — Mueller, somehow, has to be gotten rid of. The only question is when. Neither Trump nor his associates have ever acknowledged this, although Trump once described it as a “red line” if Mueller ever started examining his financial holdings. Mueller has certainly crossed that line.

It is widely accepted in Washington political circles that Trump is seeking an opportunity to fire Mueller. To this end, many of his media boosters at Fox News are working overtime in trying to come up with ways to discredit Mueller and his team.

Yes, the risks for Trump in this are enormous. Any firing of Mueller — not unlike the fabled “Saturday Night Massacre” by Richard Nixon in 1973 — would trigger a constitutional crisis. But in Trump’s mind, that would be a risk worth taking if the stark alternative — as a response to Mueller’s eventual findings — is impeachment.

This drama is only beginning.

Tony Burman is former head of Al Jazeera English and CBC News. Reach him @TonyBurman or at tony.burman@gmail.com.

Delivered dailyThe Morning Headlines Newsletter

The Toronto Star and <a href=”http://thestar.com” rel=”nofollow”>thestar.com</a>, each property of Toronto Star Newspapers Limited, One Yonge Street, 4th Floor, Toronto, ON, M5E 1E6. You can unsubscribe at any time. Please contact us or see our privacy policy for more information.

You might be interested in

RCMP probe clears officers accused of mistreating family…

Colten Boushie’s family filed a complaint about how they were treated…

X

China Disputes Trump’s Claims Of Fentanyl ‘Flood’ Into United States
 

mikenova shared this story from Donald Trump.

Law enforcement agencies and drug control experts say most of the fentanyl distributed in the U.S., as well as precursor chemicals, originate from China.

Donald Trump has two Hail Mary plays left fire Mueller, or start war with North Korea: Burman – Toronto Star
 

mikenova shared this story from donald trump racketeering – Google News.


Toronto Star
Donald Trump has two Hail Mary plays left fire Mueller, or start war with North Korea: Burman
Toronto Star
Donald Trump has two Hail Mary plays left fire Mueller, or start war with North Korea: Burman. As he leaves on a … Former FBI Director Robert Mueller, seen here in an Oct. 28, 2013, file photo, has the potential to destroy Donald Trump’s teetering 
Gregg Jarrett: Still no evidence of Trump-Russia ‘collusion’ – but Hillary is a different matterFox News
FBI to Donald Trump: Happy HalloweenWaterloo Cedar Falls Courier
You bet there’s collusion: And other reasons Donald Trump should be nervous after Robert Mueller’s indictmentsNew York Daily News
The Independent –Department of Justice
all 8,223 news articles »
What Donald Trump Thinks It Takes to Be a Man – New York Times
 

mikenova shared this story from Donald Trump – Google News.


New York Times
What Donald Trump Thinks It Takes to Be a Man
New York Times
Donald Trump is a new kind of old-school American man. In some ways, he’s a throwback to days when authority and power were exclusively white and male by definition, when displays of masculine entitlement were overt and unapologetic. But he’s also a … 

Presidents of France and Russia Tackle Issues on Syria and Iran – Prensa Latina
 

mikenova shared this story from russia france – Google News.


National Post
Presidents of France and Russia Tackle Issues on Syria and Iran
Prensa Latina
03 de noviembre de 2017, 16:47Paris, Nov 3 (Prensa Latina) French President Emmanuel Macron spoke by telephone with his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin, tackling issues on Syria, Iran and bilateral relations, said today sources from the Elysee 
Macron Appeals To Putin For Help In Establishing Aid Corridors In SyriaRadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty
Macron, Putin discuss situation in Syria over phone: ElyseeXinhua
Putin and the Revival of Russian Power by Professor Jonathan AdelmanHuffPost
Expatica France
all 127 news articles »
US Lobbyists Missed Red Flags in Manafort-linked Contracts
 

mikenova shared this story from Voice of America.

Two U.S. firms caught up in the special counsel’s indictment against Paul Manafort claim to have been misled about the details of the former Trump campaign chairman’s lobbying efforts for Ukraine, but clear warning signals were readily available. Voice of America’s Ukrainian Service has turned up several U.S. and European news articles from 2007 to 2014, and spoken with Ukrainian politicians, that lay out connections between the Brussels-based non-profit that hired the firms and the then-ruling party in Ukraine a key fact that the lobbying firms claim not to have known at the time. “Lobbyists should have examined available information carefully at the time of the engagement as a matter of know-your-client procedure,” said Gene Burd, a Washington-based international business partner with Arnall Golden Gregory LLP. He said the two firms listed in the indictment as Company A and Company B, but recently identified as Mercury Public Affairs and The Podesta Group  should also “have kept up with the changing management situation and sources of financing of the organization.” Manafort, who served as President Donald Trump’s campaign chairman for three months in 2016, was indicted in a U.S. federal court Monday on multiple charges including having failed to register as a lobbyist for a foreign government at a time when his firm was acting on behalf of then-Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych’s pro-Kremlin Party of Regions. The indictment describes that work as part of a “scheme” by Manafort and co-defendant Rick Gates to generate U.S. support for the party, which favored aligning Kyiv with Moscow instead of seeking European Union membership, as many Ukrainians advocated. The indictment says both lobbying groups were recruited by Manafort’s firm to act on behalf of a Brussels-based non-profit known as the European Center for a Modern Ukraine (ECFMU) from 2012 to 2014. It says the ECFMU was, in fact, a vehicle for advancing the interests of Yanukovych’s Party of Regions. Both firms deny that they knowingly engaged in an image-rehabilitation campaign for Yanukovych’s Party of Regions, as the indictment indicates. Their latest public statement reiterates their claim that they were led to believe they were working only for ECFMU, which they understood to be a pro-EU think tank that sought to inform U.S. government officials about Ukraine. Podesta Group CEO Kimberley Fritts told VOA’s Ukrainian Service in August 2016, when their undisclosed foreign lobbying efforts were first reported, that, relying on the opinion of in-house and external legal counsel, her organization lawfully represented ECFMU interests in the United States without registering under the U.S. Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA). “Because [our] firm was partnering with Mercury, [Podesta] in-house counsel coordinated with Mercury’s [in-house] counsel and Mercury’s outside legal counsel,” she was quoted as saying in an official statement emailed to VOA from the Podesta group. “Together, they concluded that LDA [Lobbying Disclosure Act] was the appropriate reporting route.” LDA registration is required of U.S. lobbyists representing business and non-governmental foreign interests such as cultural or educational organizations, whereas FARA’s more rigorous and legally binding registration disclosures are required to lobby on behalf of foreign governments or political parties. Fritts also told VOA that the two lobbying groups agreed to work for the ECFMU only after its director filed a written statement verifying that “none of the activities of the Center are directly or indirectly supervised, directed, controlled, financed or subsidized in whole or in part by a government of a foreign country or a foreign political party.” Former ECFMU director Ina Kirsch verified Fritts’ account of events, telling VOA that she personally assured Podesta and Mercury legal counsel that ECFMU “has never received any money from the Party of Regions, Ukrainian government or president,” and that it received funds from only private companies. Kirsch also said that ECFMU did not pay any money to the U.S. firms for their lobbying work. That claim is supported by Monday’s indictment, which states that “companies A and B,” which collectively received more than $2 million for their work, were paid not by the ECFMU, but from offshore bank accounts run by Manafort’s firm in Kyiv. “We believed [Manafort’s associate, Rick Gates, who introduced ECFMU to the Podesta Group] was working for [the ECFMU], as we were hired to do,” the Fritts statement said. However, an online search of news articles from 2007 to 2014 reveal Manafort’s role as Yanukovych’s principal strategist and identify the ECFMU as a vehicle of the Party of Regions. A 2007 New York Times report on then-prime minister Yanukovych, for example, portrayed Manafort as a “behind-the-scenes” impresario who had taken the “once divisive [Yanukovych], reviled by some [Ukrainians] as a shady reactionary and Kremlin pawn,” and turned him into “arguably the nation’s most popular politician.” Similar reports by Ukrainian news outlets described the range of Manafort’s political lobbying strategies and cited ECFMU documents that positioned the non-profit as a Party of Regions instrument of international influence. In March 2012, Ukrainska Pravda, one of Ukraine’s most influential mainstream news websites, published an ECFMU exposé that listed long-time Party of Regions MP Leonid Kozhara who went on to become Yanukovych’s foreign minister in December of that year as head of the ECFMU. The article also identifies two other prominent Party of Regions MPs, Evgen Geller and Vitaly Kalyzhny, as ECFMU founders. In a June 2012 interview with Kyiv-based Glavcom, Kozhara mentions the center’s financial dependence on government sources and describes its alignment with his government’s international objectives. Glavcom reporter: It is known that you have co-founded the European Center for a Modern Ukraine, which looks like it is busy with improving the image of Ukrainian authorities as related to the case of [then-imprisoned former Prime Minister Yulia] Tymoshenko. Is this so? ECFMU’s Kozhara: … When I received an invitation from Brussels to chair the European Center for a Modern Ukraine, I was honored. I saw it as an acknowledgment of my work. When asked about the sources of ECFMU financing, Kozhara said: “As all NGOs, we have membership fees, but business structures and government structures all give money. If they want to receive the assistance, they should pay membership fees.” In an August 2016 interview with VOA, Kozhara denied having ever held a position with the ECFMU, describing himself as an unpaid board member of various NGOs, of which ECFMU was but one. Manafort and Gates are accused of serving as unregistered foreign agents of Ukrainian interests in violation of Department of Justice registration requirements. Between them, Manafort and Gates controlled 12 domestic entities, 12 Cyprus-based entities and three other foreign entities, according to the indictment. In all, $75 million passed through the offshore accounts. Manafort is alleged to have laundered more than $18 million. Gates is accused of laundering more than $3 million from offshore accounts. Podesta Group founder Tony Podesta, a long-time Democratic Party fund-raiser and brother to former Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta, abruptly resigned from the group hours after the indictment was made public. John, who co-founded the group with his brother in 1988, has not been associated with the group since the 1990s and is not associated with the indictment. The Podesta Group lobbies on behalf of various foreign interests, including the governments of Azerbaijan and Saudi Arabia. It has also represented Sberbank, Russia’s largest bank. According to the New York Times, Mercury partner Michael McKeon issued a statement that the firm “takes its obligations to follow all laws, rules and regulations very seriously” and “has and will continue to fully cooperate with the Office of the Special Counsel in its investigation.” No charges have been brought against Tony Podesta, his former lobbying group or Mercury, but all have been subpoenaed for records and testimony regarding their work with Manafort, Gates and the ECFMU. This story originated in VOA’s Ukrainian Service.

Parliament Asks Twitter About Russian Meddling in Brexit Vote
 

mikenova shared this story from NYT > Europe.

Damian Collins, a British lawmaker, wrote in a letter to Twitter that some Russian-linked Twitter accounts were also posting content that relates to the politics of the United Kingdom.

Voice of America: US Lobbyists Missed Red Flags in Manafort-linked Contracts
 

mikenova shared this story from 1. Russia from mikenova (105 sites).

Two U.S. firms caught up in the special counsel’s indictment against Paul Manafort claim to have been misled about the details of the former Trump campaign chairman’s lobbying efforts for Ukraine, but clear warning signals were readily available. Voice of America’s Ukrainian Service has turned up several U.S. and European news articles from 2007 to 2014, and spoken with Ukrainian politicians, that lay out connections between the Brussels-based non-profit that hired the firms and the then-ruling party in Ukraine a key fact that the lobbying firms claim not to have known at the time. “Lobbyists should have examined available information carefully at the time of the engagement as a matter of know-your-client procedure,” said Gene Burd, a Washington-based international business partner with Arnall Golden Gregory LLP. He said the two firms listed in the indictment as Company A and Company B, but recently identified as Mercury Public Affairs and The Podesta Group  should also “have kept up with the changing management situation and sources of financing of the organization.” Manafort, who served as President Donald Trump’s campaign chairman for three months in 2016, was indicted in a U.S. federal court Monday on multiple charges including having failed to register as a lobbyist for a foreign government at a time when his firm was acting on behalf of then-Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych’s pro-Kremlin Party of Regions. The indictment describes that work as part of a “scheme” by Manafort and co-defendant Rick Gates to generate U.S. support for the party, which favored aligning Kyiv with Moscow instead of seeking European Union membership, as many Ukrainians advocated. The indictment says both lobbying groups were recruited by Manafort’s firm to act on behalf of a Brussels-based non-profit known as the European Center for a Modern Ukraine (ECFMU) from 2012 to 2014. It says the ECFMU was, in fact, a vehicle for advancing the interests of Yanukovych’s Party of Regions. Both firms deny that they knowingly engaged in an image-rehabilitation campaign for Yanukovych’s Party of Regions, as the indictment indicates. Their latest public statement reiterates their claim that they were led to believe they were working only for ECFMU, which they understood to be a pro-EU think tank that sought to inform U.S. government officials about Ukraine. Podesta Group CEO Kimberley Fritts told VOA’s Ukrainian Service in August 2016, when their undisclosed foreign lobbying efforts were first reported, that, relying on the opinion of in-house and external legal counsel, her organization lawfully represented ECFMU interests in the United States without registering under the U.S. Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA). “Because [our] firm was partnering with Mercury, [Podesta] in-house counsel coordinated with Mercury’s [in-house] counsel and Mercury’s outside legal counsel,” she was quoted as saying in an official statement emailed to VOA from the Podesta group. “Together, they concluded that LDA [Lobbying Disclosure Act] was the appropriate reporting route.” LDA registration is required of U.S. lobbyists representing business and non-governmental foreign interests such as cultural or educational organizations, whereas FARA’s more rigorous and legally binding registration disclosures are required to lobby on behalf of foreign governments or political parties. Fritts also told VOA that the two lobbying groups agreed to work for the ECFMU only after its director filed a written statement verifying that “none of the activities of the Center are directly or indirectly supervised, directed, controlled, financed or subsidized in whole or in part by a government of a foreign country or a foreign political party.” Former ECFMU director Ina Kirsch verified Fritts’ account of events, telling VOA that she personally assured Podesta and Mercury legal counsel that ECFMU “has never received any money from the Party of Regions, Ukrainian government or president,” and that it received funds from only private companies. Kirsch also said that ECFMU did not pay any money to the U.S. firms for their lobbying work. That claim is supported by Monday’s indictment, which states that “companies A and B,” which collectively received more than $2 million for their work, were paid not by the ECFMU, but from offshore bank accounts run by Manafort’s firm in Kyiv. “We believed [Manafort’s associate, Rick Gates, who introduced ECFMU to the Podesta Group] was working for [the ECFMU], as we were hired to do,” the Fritts statement said. However, an online search of news articles from 2007 to 2014 reveal Manafort’s role as Yanukovych’s principal strategist and identify the ECFMU as a vehicle of the Party of Regions. A 2007 New York Times report on then-prime minister Yanukovych, for example, portrayed Manafort as a “behind-the-scenes” impresario who had taken the “once divisive [Yanukovych], reviled by some [Ukrainians] as a shady reactionary and Kremlin pawn,” and turned him into “arguably the nation’s most popular politician.” Similar reports by Ukrainian news outlets described the range of Manafort’s political lobbying strategies and cited ECFMU documents that positioned the non-profit as a Party of Regions instrument of international influence. In March 2012, Ukrainska Pravda, one of Ukraine’s most influential mainstream news websites, published an ECFMU exposé that listed long-time Party of Regions MP Leonid Kozhara who went on to become Yanukovych’s foreign minister in December of that year as head of the ECFMU. The article also identifies two other prominent Party of Regions MPs, Evgen Geller and Vitaly Kalyzhny, as ECFMU founders. In a June 2012 interview with Kyiv-based Glavcom, Kozhara mentions the center’s financial dependence on government sources and describes its alignment with his government’s international objectives. Glavcom reporter: It is known that you have co-founded the European Center for a Modern Ukraine, which looks like it is busy with improving the image of Ukrainian authorities as related to the case of [then-imprisoned former Prime Minister Yulia] Tymoshenko. Is this so? ECFMU’s Kozhara: … When I received an invitation from Brussels to chair the European Center for a Modern Ukraine, I was honored. I saw it as an acknowledgment of my work. When asked about the sources of ECFMU financing, Kozhara said: “As all NGOs, we have membership fees, but business structures and government structures all give money. If they want to receive the assistance, they should pay membership fees.” In an August 2016 interview with VOA, Kozhara denied having ever held a position with the ECFMU, describing himself as an unpaid board member of various NGOs, of which ECFMU was but one. Manafort and Gates are accused of serving as unregistered foreign agents of Ukrainian interests in violation of Department of Justice registration requirements. Between them, Manafort and Gates controlled 12 domestic entities, 12 Cyprus-based entities and three other foreign entities, according to the indictment. In all, $75 million passed through the offshore accounts. Manafort is alleged to have laundered more than $18 million. Gates is accused of laundering more than $3 million from offshore accounts. Podesta Group founder Tony Podesta, a long-time Democratic Party fund-raiser and brother to former Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta, abruptly resigned from the group hours after the indictment was made public. John, who co-founded the group with his brother in 1988, has not been associated with the group since the 1990s and is not associated with the indictment. The Podesta Group lobbies on behalf of various foreign interests, including the governments of Azerbaijan and Saudi Arabia. It has also represented Sberbank, Russia’s largest bank. According to the New York Times, Mercury partner Michael McKeon issued a statement that the firm “takes its obligations to follow all laws, rules and regulations very seriously” and “has and will continue to fully cooperate with the Office of the Special Counsel in its investigation.” No charges have been brought against Tony Podesta, his former lobbying group or Mercury, but all have been subpoenaed for records and testimony regarding their work with Manafort, Gates and the ECFMU. This story originated in VOA’s Ukrainian Service.

 Voice of America

golosamerikius’s YouTube Videos: «Старик Мюллер не подкачал»
 

mikenova shared this story from 1. Russia from mikenova (105 sites).

From: golosamerikius
Duration: 04:19

Политолог Ариэль Коэн об обвинениях против Пола Манафорта и угрозах республиканцев в адрес спецпрокурора Мюллера
Оригинальное видео: https://www.golos-ameriki.ru/a/muller-manafort/4099142.html

 golosamerikius’s YouTube Videos

Anthony Weiner – Google News: Anthony Weiner expected to surrender himself over to authorities this weekend to serve 21-month sentence for … – Daily Mail
 

mikenova shared this story from 1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites).


Daily Mail
Anthony Weiner expected to surrender himself over to authorities this weekend to serve 21-month sentence for …
Daily Mail
Anthony Weiner expected to surrender himself over to authorities this weekend to serve 21-month sentence for exchanging lewd text messages with teen. Exclusive: Undercover FBI agent on one of the biggest takedowns in history; Kim Kardashian in charge … 

 Anthony Weiner – Google News

In Donald Trump’s world, the buck stops over there | Opinion
 

mikenova shared this story from New Orleans Opinions.

When he was campaigning for the president Donald Trump said, “I know more about ISIS than the generals do, believe me.” But as smart as he is, and as much as he knows about everything, when things go wrong, Trump refuses to accept any blame.  After U.S. Navy Seal Willian “Ryan” Owens was killed on a covert mission in Yemen, Trump said the plan for that mission “was started before I got here.”  It was something his generals “wanted to do. And they came to see me and they explained what they wanted to do, the generals, who are very respected. And they lost Ryan.”

Not “we” lost Ryan, but “they” lost Ryan.

After four American soldiers were killed on a military mission in Niger, Trump, Defense Secretary James Mattis wouldn’t say if the president had specifically approved the mission, but when Trump was asked he seemed eager to exonerate himself.  “No, I didn’t, not specifically. I have generals that are great generals. These are great fighters; these are warriors. I gave them authority to do what’s right so that we win. That’s the authority they have. I want to win. And we’re going to win.”

The President – whoever he is – has to decide,” President Harry Truman said in his 1953 farewell address. “He can’t pass the buck to anybody. No one else can do the deciding for him. That’s his job.”  Truman’s legendary “The Buck Stops Here” sign is on display at his presidential library in Independence, Mo.

Maybe Trump should go gaze upon it.

If the military’s commander-in-chief believes he can talk about the military using the third person, then it shouldn’t surprise anyone that he thinks he can separate himself from the people on his campaign who are now in legal hot water.

Paul Manafort – who was arrested Monday on charges that include money laundering and conspiracy against the United States – was, at one point, the campaign manager for Trump’s campaign.  But so what? Trump tweeted Monday (Oct. 30) that the charges spelled out in the indictment against Manafort mostly allege crimes that happen before Manafort managed Trump’s campaign. That’s true.  But let us imagine Trump’s response if the campaign manager of one of his political enemies had been accused of conspiring against our country.

Would Trump have avoided drawing a line between that campaign manager and that political enemy?  Of course not. But the message coming out of the White House is that we shouldn’t make Manafort’s troubles Trump’s troubles.  Because that’s not fair.

At the same time, the White House is citing a 2010 deal that allowed Russia to buy into a U.S. uranium company and the fact that President Bill Clinton received $500,000 to speak in Moscow, to argue that it was really Hillary Clinton who was colluding with Putin..

As <a href=”http://FactCheck.org” rel=”nofollow”>FactCheck.org</a> puts it, “Donald Trump falsely accused former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton of giving away U.S. uranium rights to the Russians and claimed — without evidence — that it was done in exchange for donations to the Clinton Foundation.”

Even if we don’t anything about the uranium deal -the details of which are at FactCheck.Org – we still know that there was only one candidate in last year’s election who was praising Putin.

This White House talks to us as if we were literally born yesterday and, thus, can’t remember the great Trump-Putin bromance of 2015 and ’16.

“Putin hates us,” candidate Trump said in June 2015. “He hates Obama. He doesn’t hate us. I think he’d like me. I’d get along great with him, I think. If you want to know the truth.”

To accept Trump’s new theory of Clinton-Putin collusion we’d have to accept that a dictator who hated President Barack Obama loved Obama’s secretary of state and that he dictator who Trump said would like him would choose to favor Trump’s opponent.

We can twist our minds into knots trying to make that theory make sense or we can just accept the findings of the U.S. intelligence community: “Putin most likely wanted to discredit Secretary Clinton because he has publicly blamed her since 2011 for inciting mass protests against his regime in late 2011 and early 2012, and because he holds a grudge for comments he almost certainly saw as disparaging him.”

From that same report: “Russia’s goals were to undermine public faith in the US democratic process, denigrate Secretary Clinton, and harm her electability and potential presidency. We further assess Putin and the Russian Government developed a clear preference for President-elect Trump.”

Trump’s tweet Monday focused on Manafort, but his former campaign director’s arrest wasn’t Monday’s only news. We also learned that a campaign aide, George Papadopoulos has pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. According to the statement of offense, Papadopoulos sent multiple email messages to a “high-ranking campaign official” informing him that the Russians were trying to connect with Trump’s campaign.  Trump is now characterizing Papadopoulos as a “low level volunteer.”

If Trump can’t be held accountable for military decisions when he’s the commander-in-chief and he can’t be held accountable for criminality in his campaign when he was the candidate, then it’s pretty clear he doesn’t expect us to hold him accountable for anything.

Jarvis DeBerry is deputy opinions editor for NOLA.COM | The Times-Picayune. He can be reached at jdeberry@nola.com or at twitter.com/jarvisdeberry.

How Will Putin Play Trumps Russia Investigation Narrative?
 

mikenova shared this story from Newsweek.

This article first appeared on Just Security.

The 2016 election will be remembered for, among other things, Russian attacks including cyber theft, propaganda, trolls, bots, disinformation, efforts to use social media to stoke negative passions and possible espionage (in common parlance, collusion).

Several commentators have correctly reminded us that such activity is wholly consistent with Russian intelligence activity over the decades.

Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now

As such, we should also be on the lookout for another classic Russian trick: strategic deception.

Lack of public awareness about this part of the Kremlin playbook threatens to unravel whatever traction we gain in finding the truth about 2016 and in defending ourselves against current threats and ones over the horizon.

Strategic deception is a secret, offensive effort to create an alternative narrative that serves Moscow’s interests.

Unlike Russia’s fake news and disinformation efforts designed to confuse or meet tactical ends, strategic deception is designed to build a believable and consistent narrative forcing the recipient to take a specific action.

It was used in the past to safeguard the identity of Russian spies in the U.S. and uncover perceived threats to the regime.

Efforts to deceive are most effective when they play to preconceived notions, and tell an adversary something it is desperate to know.

In this sense, Facebook and Russian deception have something in common – they succeed by selling us exactly what we want to hear. Facebook tracks your likes and interests, providing you with what you are inclined to believe. Clever deception, especially when dipped in some of the same insights of behavioral psychology, does much the same thing.

While I can’t pretend to know when and how the Russians will undertake a deception operation, my sense is that it will be around the issue of collusion.

Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Hamburg, Germany, on July 7, 2017. SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty

If there was collusion with the Trump team, the Russians will surely be looking to steer U.S. authorities toward alternate explanations for the activities of 2015 and 2016.

If there was no collusion whatsoever, the Russians may follow an alternative strategy of actively promoting the story as a means of weakening the Trump Administration and our trust in the democratic system.

In either case, their goal is the same: turn the U.S. against itself and protect Russian interests.

Moscow’s effort to safeguard the identity of its spies in 1980s Washington is a classic example of this deception strategy in action.

In the mid-1980s the KGB was facing a dilemma. They found themselves in the enviable position of having two highly placed spies inside the U.S. national security apparatus – Aldrich Ames at CIA and Robert Hanssen at FBI.

The two had informed the KGB of a group of Soviet officials who had been spying for Washington.

Despite KGB efforts to quietly remove the traitors from positions of access, the Soviet leadership insisted that the Russian spies be immediately arrested, imprisoned and executed. The KGB was left with the burden of safeguarding Ames and Hanssen from U.S. officials who would now be looking hard for explanations of why their long-time spies were suddenly uncovered.

The Soviets needed to provide alternative explanations rather than allowing the Americans to accept the real answer – that they had their own spies in their midst.

The Russians turned to one of their most developed and time-honored skills-sets – deception. They looked to send false signals to the Americans to force them to look anywhere else for an explanation for their losses, and not focus on a possible mole inside the grounds.

The deception effort was aimed directly within the walls of CIA. The KGB knew that CIA was hesitant to again turn itself inside-out looking for spies. CIA had suffered through a period of self-destruction at the hands of the recently-retired powerful counterintelligence chief James Jesus Angleton, who had convinced CIA leadership that the Soviets were ten feet tall.

The subsequent hunt for moles inside CIA had destroyed careers, severely damaged the effort to recruit new spies and created a sense of paralyzing paranoia within the ranks. Into this atmosphere the Russians sought to create a narrative that the CIA’s 1986 spy losses were a combination of poor CIA tradecraft, KGB luck, a technical penetration of Moscow Station and possibly a breach of CIA communications between their Headquarters and the field.

They did this primarily by dangling a double agent to the CIA Station in Moscow.

Senior KGB counterintelligence officer Alexander Zhomov (GTPROLOGUE) made clandestine contact with the CIA Station Chief in Moscow, and over several months provided detailed information on the KGB monitoring CIA officers in the capital. Zhomov provided a wealth of real, sensitive information that was twisted slightly to shape a narrative that the CIA was ready to accept – that the losses were due to a mixture of CIA mistakes and KGB lucky breaks.

Zhomov was taken more seriously than he might otherwise have been due to his high position in the KGB. The CIA was on guard for possible double agents who would sell false or low value information.

Past experience, however, had taught them that the KGB was extremely unlikely to provide CIA direct contact with a senior staff officer with access to the crown jewels for fear that he might be turned. That’s the very risk that the KGB took and changed their MO in furtherance of the highly crafted deception effort to protect their penetrations in Washington.

A separate but complementary project was also launched suggesting the KGB had success breaking into CIA’s encrypted communications, which further taxed the agency’s limited resources devoted to uncovering the reasons for the spy losses.

All of these efforts were designed to shape the narrative, send signals to the Americans and buy time that could be used to protect their investments in Ames and Hanssen. Once CIA and FBI had finally untangled it all, the passage of time had bought the KGB several more years to exploit Ames and Hanssen (and others?).

By the mid-80s, the CIA was ready to believe almost any other explanation other than the obvious – that they had a mole in their midst. Angleton’s paralyzing paranoia and distrust had torn CIA apart to the point that the pendulum might have swung too far in the other direction.

Deep knowledge of your adversary is critical in crafting an effective deception effort. The tendency to accept what you want to hear and dismiss what you don’t is a hazard to policymakers and intelligence analysts (and laypersons) alike. We wanted to believe that Saddam had nuclear weapons.

Also, for many years the Soviets dismissed the reporting of their best secret source – Kim Philby – because he told them (accurately) that the British Intelligence Service did not have any spies inside the Kremlin prior to WWII. Soviet leadership simply couldn’t believe that they were not the top target of the vaunted British Intelligence Service.

Russia has long-experience with strategic deception, and has invested heavily in understanding American psychological fibers. Indeed, the first operation of the nascent Soviet intelligence service following the Russian revolution was the creation of an elaborate but fake monarchist organization to attract opponents of the regime. “Operation Trust” ran for several years and led to the (literal) liquidation of the anti-Bolshevik resistance.

In the 21st century Putin has invested heavily in his intelligence services, benefitting from sensitive stolen information from cyber thieves and human spies, to include recently reported NSA breaches and access to Edward Snowden, among others.

In 2016, it was clear that the United States was not ready to defend against Russian interference. Unlike the Europeans who were far more savvy about Russian intentions, there is a tendency in U.S. culture to “trust but verify.”

U.S. journalists tend to report about Russia as if it is a western country where rule-of-law reigns. We try to verify and question every allegation before we accept the worst. We assume things are on the up-and-up unless we can prove otherwise – innocent until proven guilty.

Russia benefits from our naivete. What we need to do first is open eyes to the consistent, decades-long pattern of Russian attacks. Corruption, espionage, lies, disinformation and deception are the routine tools of Putin and the Kremlin, and will continue to be so into the indefinite future.

We would be better served to assume ill-intent, and not feel obligated to uncover conclusive evidence of wrongdoing in every case. Totally uncorrupted business is an aberration in Russia, and we have decades of experience with their use of disinformation and deception to push any agenda that damages U.S. and western cohesion.

While we may not find incontrovertible proof every time, the cumulative and historical effect is that Americans should preserve a very healthy skepticism when evaluating the motivations of the Russian government – guilty until proven innocent.

What’s more, because so much of what Russia does is secret and managed by the intelligence services, we are rarely going to be able to develop the kind of “evidence” that we would like to divine guilt or innocence.

As I’ve written recently, I believe that collusion is possible and that the much-maligned Steele dossier is more right than wrong. However, I also suspect that it will be very hard to prove.

Into this atmosphere Russian intelligence will certainly look to frame the narrative to fit their interests. They may, for example, provide a false lead suggesting collusion with the Trump campaign, only to pull the rug later to try to discredit the whole investigatory enterprise.

Or they may allow the release of a false and weak form of kompromat on the President to suggest they don’t have anything stronger.

Who knows what exactly their craft will deliver to a segment of the population ready to believe a certain narrative. The recent flood of information on Russian troll factories and use of social media may be part and parcel of a Russian effort to divert our attention away from possible collusion. I don’t know. They certainly left many fingerprints in their use of social media platforms.

At the very least, however, what we do know is that Moscow will most likely seek to muddy the waters and make it hard to know what information is real, and what’s not.

A basic awareness of strategic deception can help us avoid these traps, and pry ourselves loose when we’re found in one.

John Sipher is a Director of Customer Success at CrossLead, a software and consulting firm. He retired in 2014 after a 28-year career in the CIA’s National Clandestine Service. having served as a member of the CIA’s Senior Intelligence Service.

Conservatives introduce measure demanding Mueller’s resignation – Politico
 

mikenova shared this story from 2016 Presidential Election Investigation – Google News.


Politico
Conservatives introduce measure demanding Mueller’s resignation
Politico
Mueller is investigating whether any Americans aided Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election as well as whether figures in the Trump administration may have obstructed justice in part by moving to oust Comey in May, when the FBI’s 
Conservative Republicans demand Mueller recuse himself over uranium dealWashington Post
GOP Reps. Gaetz, Gohmert, Biggs push for Mueller resignation in new resolutionFox News
Congressman Andy Biggs’ Statement on the State of the Mueller InvestigationSonoran News
The Independent
all 49 news articles »
Elections 2016 Investigation – Google News: US Republicans seek special counsel’s removal from Russia probe – Reuters
 

mikenova shared this story from 1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites).


Reuters
US Republicans seek special counsel’s removal from Russia probe
Reuters
WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Three Republican U.S. lawmakers called on Friday for Robert Mueller to resign as special counselinvestigating Russia and the 2016 U.S. election, the latest in a series of conservatives’ criticisms of the FBI and Justice and more »

 Elections 2016 Investigation – Google News

calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News: US Republicans seek special counsel’s removal from Russia probe – Reuters
 

mikenova shared this story from 1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites).


Reuters
US Republicans seek special counsel’s removal from Russia probe
Reuters
WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Three Republican U.S. lawmakers called on Friday for Robert Mueller to resign as special counsel investigating Russia and the 2016 U.S. election, the latest in a series of conservatives’ criticisms of the FBI and Justice and more »

 calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News

putin won US 2016 election – Google News: How Will Putin Play Trump’s Russia Investigation Narrative? – Newsweek
 

mikenova shared this story from 1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites).


Newsweek
How Will Putin Play Trump’s Russia Investigation Narrative?
Newsweek
The 2016 election will be remembered for, among other things, Russian attacks including cyber theft, propaganda, trolls, bots, disinformation, efforts to use social media to stoke negative passions and possible espionage (in common parlance, collusion 

 putin won US 2016 election – Google News

Uzbekistan: Where the New York Terror Suspect Was Radicalized
 

mikenova shared this story .

Signed in as mikenova

Share this story on NewsBlur

Shared stories are on their way…

Is Jared Kushner next to be indicted in Russia investigation? – Metro US
 

mikenova shared this story from 2016 Presidential Election Investigation – Google News.


Metro US
Is Jared Kushner next to be indicted in Russia investigation?
Metro US
The FBI has reportedly been looking into Kushner since before Mueller even took over the investigation for his multiple roles on the Trump campaign and transition team and the 2016 meeting at Trump Tower with Russia’s ambassador and a Russian banker …
Jared Kushner turns over documents to special counsel Robert Mueller in Russia probeNew York Daily Newsall 107 news articles »

trump criminal investigation – Google News: Russia, Trump, and the 2016 US Election – Council on Foreign Relations
 

mikenova shared this story from 1. Trump from mikenova (195 sites).


Council on Foreign Relations
Russia, Trump, and the 2016 US Election
Council on Foreign Relations
Special Counsel Robert Mueller is leading a criminal inquiry for the Department of Justice (DOJ), the most high-profileinvestigation. He has a mandate to examine any links or coordination between Trump’s …and more »

 trump criminal investigation – Google News

Cyprus Gave Manafort’s Bank Records to Mueller Team, Sources Say – Bloomberg
 

mikenova shared this story from Manafort – Google News.


Bloomberg
Cyprus Gave Manafort’s Bank Records to Mueller Team, Sources Say
Bloomberg
Authorities in Cyprus handed over bank and company records to U.S. investigators late last week related to former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and his business partner Rick Gates, just before they were indicted in the U.S., according to people …and more »

Russian trolls exploit social media to stir racial chaos – The Philadelphia Tribune
 

mikenova shared this story from Russian propaganda on social media – Google News.

Russian trolls exploit social media to stir racial chaos
The Philadelphia Tribune
As if we Americans were not doing a good enough job of hating each other on our own, recent news reports tell us Russiantrolls are using social media to divide us even more along racial and political lines. Thanks, folks, but we don’t need the helpand more »

Mueller Reveals New Manafort Link to Organized Crime
 

mikenova shared this story .

Buried deep in Robert Mueller’s indictment of Paul Manafort is a new link between Donald Trump’s former campaign and Russian organized crime.

The indictment (PDF), unsealed on Monday, includes an extensive look into Paul Manafort’s byzantine financial dealings. In particular, it details how he used a company called Lucicle Consultants Limited to wire millions of dollars into the United States.

The Cyprus-based Lucicle Consultants Limited, in turn, reportedly received millions of dollars from a businessman and Ukrainian parliamentarian named Ivan Fursin, who is closely linked to one of Russia’s most notorious criminals: Semion Mogilevich.

Mogilevich is frequently described as “the most dangerous mobster in the world.” Currently believed to be safe in Moscow, he is, according to the FBI, responsible for weapons trafficking, contract killings, and international prostitution. In 2009, he made the bureau’s Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list.

“Ivan Fursin was a senior figure in the Mogilevich criminal organization,” Taras Kuzio, a non-resident fellow at Johns Hopkins-SAIS’ Center for Transatlantic Relations and a specialist on the region told The Daily Beast.

Martin Sheil, a retired criminal investigator for the IRS, said the indictment, with its connections to Fursin, helps illuminate the murky world Manafort operated in before taking the reins of Trump’s presidential bid.

“This indictment strongly indicates the existence of a previously unknown relationship between an alleged Russian organized crime leader and Mr. Manafort,” Sheil told The Daily Beast.

According to the indictment, Manafort and his former business partner, Rick Gates, used Lucicle to avoid paying taxes on money which they then spent on a variety of pricey items: clothes, antiques, and at least one Mercedes-Benz.

Paul Manafort’s attorney, Kevin Downing, told reporters on Monday that the idea that anyone would engage in such a scheme is laughable.

“The second thing about this indictment that I, myself, find most ridiculous is a claim that maintaining offshore accounts to bring all your funds into the United States, as a scheme to conceal from the United States government, is ridiculous,” he told a scrum of reporters on the steps of a D.C. courthouse.

But the indictment alleges otherwise. According to Mueller’s team, from April 2012 to March 2013, Lucicle transferred more than $1.3 million to a home improvement company in the Hamptons, where Manafort owns property.

Lucicle also sent more than $200,000 to a New York men’s clothing store from March 2012 to February 2013. In that same window of time, it also sent more than $100,000 to a New York antique dealer, more than $340,000 to a Florida contractor, $88,000 to a landscaper in the Hamptons, and a comparatively paltry payment of $7,500 to a clothing store in Beverly Hills.

Thank You!

You are now subscribed to the Daily Digest and Cheat Sheet. We will not share your email with anyone for any reason.

On Oct. 5, 2012, Lucicle wired in $62,750 to pay for a Mercedes-Benz. And on Valentine’s Day of 2013, it sent $14,000 to a Florida art gallery. In total, according to Mueller’s indictment, Lucicle wired more than $5 million into the U.S. for Gates and Manafort.

At least some of the money Manafort and Gates used to pay for all those goodies appears to have come from Fursin. The New York Times reported in July that Lucicle and Fursin are tied to an “offshore entity, Mistaro Ventures, which is registered in St. Kitts and Nevis and listed on a government financial disclosure form that Mr. Fursin filed in Ukraine.”

According to the Times, “Mistaro transferred millions to Lucicle in February 2012 shortly before Lucicle made the $9.9 million loan to Jesand L.L.C., a Delaware company that Mr. Manafort previously used to buy real estate in New York.” It was one month after that transfer that Lucicle started shelling out millions to pay for cars, clothes, and real estate, according to the indictment.

That isn’t Fursin’s only connection to Manafort. He is also a lawmaker for the Party of Regions, which paid at least $17 million to Manafort’s firm.

In addition, Fursin’s longtime business associate, Ukrainian billionaire Dmitry Firtash, has an off-again, on-again partnership with Manafort. Together, they tried to buy the Drake Hotel in Manhattan for a cool $850 million. Firtash also bankrolled Ukraine’s Party of Regions.

Firtash has his own legal complications. He is currently under indictment in U.S. federal court for allegedly orchestrating an international titanium mining racket. The acting U.S. attorney in Chicago recently dubbed him an “organized-crime member” and an “upper-echelon associat[e] of Russian organized crime.” His attorneys say those charges are mere “innuendo,” according to the Chicago Tribune.

A December 2005 report from the Austrian Federal Criminal Investigation Agency said the FBI described Fursin and Firtash as senior members of the Semion Mogilevich Organization.

Ken McCallion, a former federal prosecutor who represented Yulia Tymoshenko in a civil case against Manafort and Firtash, told The Daily Beast that Fursin and Firtash are close.

“It was very similar to the relationship between Manafort and Gates,” he said. “Gates was a significant player in the criminal activities that Manafort engaged in… He played a major role, he was a major lieutenant in Manafort’s organization. By the same token, Fursin was one of the chief lieutenants of Firtash.”

The Early Edition: November 3, 2017
 

mikenova shared this story from Just Security.

Before the start of business, Just Security provides a curated summary of up-to-the-minute developments at home and abroad. Heres todays news.

SYRIA

Pro-Syrian government forces have completely liberated the city of Deir al-Zour from terrorism, Syrian state television reported today, the city in the eastern part of the country was the last remaining stronghold of Islamic State militants and was the headquarters of the terrorist groups self-styled caliphate. The BBC reports.

The city was taken after a two-month campaign with the support of Russian air power, according to the U.K.-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, the AFP reports.

The armed forces, in cooperation with allied forces, liberated the city, a military source said today, Al Jazeera reports.

A Nusra Front car bomb killed at least nine and wounded 23 in a Syrian government-held village close to the Israeli-held Golan Heights. Reuters reports.

The U.S. and Russia have drafted rival U.N. Security Council resolutions in relation to the work of the Joint Investigative Mechanism (J.I.M.) and its work to determine responsibility for chemical weapons attacks in Syria. Russia recently blocked a resolution extending J.I.M.s mandate through its veto power, Edith M. Lederer reports at the AP.

Civilians in the rebel-held Damascus suburb of Eastern Ghouta have suffered as a consequence of a years-long government blockade and the humanitarian situation is desperate. Louisa Loveluck and Zakaria Zakaria report at the Washington Post.

IRAQ

Iraqi forces have entered one of the last remaining Islamic State strongholds in the country, Iraqs Joint Operations command said today, the offensive is taking place at al-Qaim near the border with Syria. Raya Jalabi reports at Reuters.

Iraqi troops have reached the border with Syria, according to an Iraqi officer, making the advance as part of the effort to recapture al-Qaim. The AP reports.

At least 741 civilians were executed by Islamic State militants during the battle for the Iraqi city of Mosul, the U.N. said in a report yesterday, the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Raad al-Hussein said that the Mosul operations subjected thousands of civilians to human rights abuses and clear violations of international humanitarian law, adding that those responsible must answer for their heinous crimes. Rick Gladstone reports at the New York Times.

The Kurds influence across Iraq, Syria, Turkey and Iran has diminished in light of the impending defeat of the Islamic State group and the aims of the four countries to stop any kind of independence movement. Yaroslav Trofimov explains at the Wall Street Journal.

U.S.-led airstrikes continue. U.S. and coalition forces carried out five airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Syria on November 1. Separately, partner forces conducted six strikes against targets in Iraq. [Central Command]

TRUMP-RUSSIA

Unsealed court documents appear to reveal that Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions knew that Trump campaign associates had contacts with Russians during the 2016 election, a campaign foreign policy adviser, George Papadopoulos, spoke to Sessions and Trump in March 2016 about setting up a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin an idea that Trump listened to with interest but Sessions was strongly opposed to. Michael S. Schmidt, Matt Apuzzo and Scott Shane report at the New York Times.

The revelations from the court documents have led to demands by Senate Democrats that Sessions explain why he did not disclose the March 2016 meeting when testifying before congressional hearings, some Senators calling for the Attorney General to appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee to clarify his testimony. Karoun Demirjian, Sari Horwitz and Adam Entous report at the Washington Post.

The Trump campaigns former foreign policy adviser Carter Page testified before the House Intelligence Committee in a private session yesterday and claimed that he had informed Sessions about his planned trip to Russia in July 2016, raising further questions about Sessions testimony and the extent of his knowledge about connections between Trump campaign officials and Russia. Manu Raju and Jeremy Herb report at CNN.

Page invoked his Fifth Amendment rights when asked why he had withheld documents from the committee relating to Russian interference, according to lawmakers. Following the testimony, Page was asked by reporters whether he had a relationship with Papadopoulos, to which he replied that he had nothing to do with any of that. Kyle Cheney reports at POLITICO.

Sam Clovis, Trumps pick for the Agriculture Departments chief scientist, has withdrawn has nomination amid the investigation into connections between the Trump campaign and Russia and the revelation that he was the campaign supervisor to Papadopoulos, who has pleaded guilty of lying to the F.B.I.. Jordan Fabian, Timothy Cama and Brett Samuels report at the Hill.

The presidents son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner has turned over documents to special counsel Robert Mueller in relation to any contacts with Russia, according to sources familiar with the matter, two separate sources have said that investigators have asked other witnesses about Kushners role in the firing of former F.B.I. Director James Comey. Evan Perez, Pamela Brown and Shimon Prokupecz report at CNN.

Trumps former campaign chairman Paul Manafort has been ordered by a U.S. judge to remain under house arrest and wear an electronic monitoring device as he awaits trial date for money-laundering and other offences, Manaforts associate and Trump campaign adviser Rick Gates also remains under house arrest and the charges against him include money-laundering and conspiracy against the U.S.. The charges were made as part of Muellers investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election. Sarah N. Lynch and Warren Strobel report at Reuters.

The Mueller indictment of Manafort reveals a connection with a notorious Russian organized crime leader, Betsy Woodruff reports at The Daily Beast.

Its a disgrace, Trump said in an interview yesterday, saying that the investigations into Russian interference were bad for our country and that Congress has found no collusion so far, the president also dismissed the use of social media by Russian operatives to spread disinformation.  John Bowden reports at the Hill.

Were not a social network, was the repeated reply of Googles general counsel during this weeks congressional hearings about Russian election interference and use of online platforms to spread propaganda, the response highlighting the attempts by tech giants to distance themselves from being labeled as social because of the associated problems. Daisuke Wakabayashi and Mike Isaac explain at the New York Times.

The Trump-Russia investigations are unveiling Trumps strange obsession with Russia and the latest news from Muellers investigation suggests that what has long been opaque will soon be clear. Joe Scarborough writes at the Washington Post.

The Mueller indictments have shone a spotlight on the poor caliber of advisers surrounding Trump during the election and the inability of the campaign to properly vet individuals who sought to support the campaign. Scott Jennings writes at CNN.

NEW YORK TERROR ATTACK

The Islamic State group yesterday claimed responsibility for Tuesdays terror attack in New York, calling the suspected attacker, 29-year-old Sayfullo Saipov, a soldier of the caliphate, but provided no evidence that they had prior knowledge of the attack being planned. Nicole Chavez and Hamdi Alkashali report at CNN.

President Trump repeated calls for Saipov to face the death penalty in a tweet last night, his remarks potentially jeopardizing a fair trial. The BBC reports.

An analysis of the clues left by Saipov and his connections with the Islamic State group is provided by Rukmini Callimachi at the New York Times.

The U.S. should be prepared for a new type of Islamist extremism in the wake of the New York terror attack, and the U.S. must focus on defeating radical Islamist ideology, Husain Haqqani writes at the Wall Street Journal.

NORTH KOREA

The U.S., Japan and South Korea flew bombers and jet fighters near North Korea yesterday, according to the U.S. Pacific Command the drill was planned in advance, but North Korea state media said it was a stealth mission demonstrating that the U.S. was aggravating the situation of the Korean Peninsula and seeking to ignite a nuclear war. Jonathan Cheng reports at the Wall Street Journal.

The joint exercises simulated attacks on land targets but did not involve live weapons, according to an anonymous South Korean military official, Kim Tong-Hyung reports at the AP.

The drills took place before Trumps trip to Asia beginning on Sunday, and the North Korean threat is set to feature prominently in discussions with Asian leaders. Soyoung Kim and Phil Stewart report at Reuters.

The U.S. Treasury severed ties with a small Chinese bank on the border with North Korea yesterday, accusing the bank of acting as a conduit for illicit North Korean financial activity. Don Weinland reports at the Financial Times.

TRUMP ASIA TRIP

The world is running out of time to deal with the threat posed by North Korea, Trump is set to tell leaders on his Asia trip, the national security adviser H.R. McMaster said yesterday, Ali Vitali reporting at NBC News.

Putin and Trump may meet at the A.P.E.C. summit in Vietnam next week, Russias Kremlin said today, Reuters reporting.

Trump plans to draw attention to Japanese citizens abducted by North Korea during his trip, an issue that has a deep emotional resonance in Japan. Motoko Rich explains at the New York Times.

Trumps Asia trip will begin in Japan on Sunday and the tour will continue to South Korea, China, Vietnam and the Philippines. Ishaan Tharoor sets out what to look for during the visit at the Washington Post.

Trumps erratic statecraft and the specter of the Russia investigations have the potential to undermine the presidents agenda during his Asia trip, in addition, the intense schedule and the problem of promoting new initiatives in the region add further complications. Mark Landler explains at the New York Times.

Trumps America First policy undermines the U.S.s ability to make an impact on human rights in Asia as the Trump administration has deployed differing human rights narratives based on a nations relationship with the U.S., in contrast to the Obama administration which responded quickly to abuses and political strife. Matt Spetalnick and Prak Chan Thul write at Reuters.

GUANTÁNAMO BAY

A federal judge in Washington may intervene in the case of defense chief Brig. Gen. John Baker who has been confined to his quarters in Guantánamo Bay for contempt of court for defying his orders and refusing to testify in the U.S.S. Cole case. Josh Gerstein reports at POLITICO.

The three civilian defense lawyers who left the U.S.S. Cole case are set to defy the military judges orders again and refuse to appear in court at Guantánamo due to a secret ethical dilemma. Carol Rosenberg reports at the Miami Herald.

CYBERSECURITY, PRIVACY AND TECHNOLOGY

Russian hackers targeted Putins detractors and those of interest to the Kremlin, a digital hit list reveals. Raphael Satter, Jeff Donn and Justin Myers report at the AP.

Attorney General Jeff Session yesterday castigated technology companies for stopping investigators from accessing encrypted information for ongoing terror investigations, Morgan Chalfant reports at the Hill.

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION FOREIGN POLICY

Well see, Trump replied when asked by an interviewer yesterday whether Secretary of State Rex Tillerson would remain in the administration for the duration of the presidents term, once again throwing doubt on the future of Tillersons position. Cristiano Lima reports at POLITICO.

The Trump administration asked the French President Emmanuel Macron to set up a meeting between Trump and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani at the U.N. General Assembly in September, Iran replied unequivocally that they would not meet with President Trump. Karen DeYoung reports at the Washington Post.

Tillerson is scheduled to visit Myanmar this month to discuss the humanitarian crisis in Rakhine State, the State Department announced yesterday, referring to the human rights abuses against the Rohingya Muslim minority. Laura Koran reports at CNN.

Russia has been taking advantage of the lack of U.S. policy in the Middle East to increase its influence, Zeina Karam writes at the AP.

Key positions in the Pentagon will finally be filled, the vacancies, which have lasted 10 months, have had an impact on U.S. operations, including in Afghanistan. Paul McLeary explains at Foreign Policy.

The U.S. pledge for $60m for a U.N.-backed counterterrorism force in Africas Sahel region comes following increased extremist activity. Azad Essa explains the details of the new force at Al Jazeera.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

The U.S. has been deliberately lying about the mysterious sonic attacks the U.S. has alleged Cuba has been carrying out against its diplomats in Havana, the Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez said yesterday, Luis Alonso Lugo reporting at the AP.

We hope that as an external party, the United States can plant more flowers and fewer thorns, Chinas Vice Foreign Minister Zheng Zeguang said today in relation to the dispute over the South China Sea, making the comments ahead of Trumps visit to Beijing next week. Michael Martina reports at Reuters.

Serbia rejected calls from the U.S. to choose between the West or Russia, the Foreign Minister Ivica Dacic saying that what is important is to see what is in our own best interests. Aleksandar Vasovic reports at Reuters.

Read on Just Security »

Today’s Headlines and Commentary
 

mikenova shared this story from Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices.

President Donald Trump leaves for Asia on Friday; he will visit Japan, China, South Korea, Vietnam and the Philippines, the New York Times reported. Trump will address the North Korean missile crisis in meetings with Chinese, Japanese and South Korean leaders. In a speech in Vietnam, Trump will build on the Japanese idea of a free and open Indo-Pacific to articulate a containment strategy against China. In advance of Trumps departure, two U.S. bombers flew close by North Korean airspace and conducted a bombing drill in South Korea, according to the Wall Street Journal. North Korean state media said the exercise was meant to simulate a nuclear strike. The U.S. Pacific Command said the exercise was not planned in response to any current event.

The Islamic State said Sayfullo Saipov, the man who killed eight people in New York using a truck on Oct. 31, was one of its soldiers but did not provide evidence he had coordinated with other Islamic State fighters, CNN reported. In its weekly newspaper, the militant organization did not say it had any prior knowledge of the attack. Federal investigators found that Saipov had about 90 videos and 3,800 images related to the Islamic State on his phone.

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will be dishonorably discharged for deserting his base in Afghanistan but will not serve any prison time, the Times reported. Bergdahl walked off his base in 2009 and shortly after, the Taliban captured and held him for five years.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is under scrutiny for his statements to Congress regarding the extent of his knowledge of Trump campaign contacts with Russia, CNN reported. Sessions failed to disclose to lawmakers at his confirmation hearing that he had rejected a proposal from Trump foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos for the candidate to meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Carter Page, another former Trump foreign policy adviser, testified before the House intelligence committee that he had told Sessions about a trip Page planned to take to Russia during the campaign, also according to CNN. Democrats on the Senate judiciary and intelligence committees want Sessions to clarify his prior testimony on the matter.

The White House was unaware that Sam Clovisthe former Trump campaign co-chair, and laternominee for USDA chief scientist, testified before a grand jury in the special counsel investigation, ABC News reported. Administration staffers learned that Clovis had come under scrutiny in the Russia investigation from media reports. Clovis was the campaign supervisor cited in the charges against George Papadopoulos who appeared to encourage Papadopoulos to cultivate ties with Russia. Separately, in recent weeks, Jared Kushner has turned over documents to the special counsel probe related to his role in the campaign, the transition and any contacts with Russians, CNN reported. On Thursday, Trump said he wished he could redirect the Justice Department to focus its efforts on Hillary Clinton, also according to CNN. He said, A lot of people are unhappy with the Justice Department, including me.

Syrian government forces and Iranian-backed militias have completely retaken the city of Deir al-Zour, the Islamic States last major stronghold in Syria, the Times reported. Russia air strikes aided the capture of the last remaining neighborhoods where militants held out against the Syrian advance. In Iraq, the town of Al-Qaim fell to the Iraqi Army and its allied militias, clearing the Islamic State from one of its last remaining territories in the country, Reuters reported. Separately, a U.N. report said the Islamic State executed hundreds of civilians during the siege of Mosul and used civilians as human shields in the course of the nine-month battle, the Times reported. The U.N.s top human rights official recommended that Iraq amend its criminal code to allow its courts to try the Islamic States offenses, which he described as war crimes, or that Iraq bring the crimes to the International Criminal Courts jurisdiction.

Three civilian defense attorneys again defied an order from a Guantanamo Bay military judge to continue representing Rahim al-Nashiri, accused of plotting the USS Cole bombing, the Miami Herald reported. The attorneys said they would not appear at a Virginia teleconferencing facility to participate in a hearing on Friday morning. A federal district court judge in Washington D.C. refused to halt the hearing because of its lack of counsel. The D.C. judge may also rule on Friday afternoon about the detention of the Marine Corps brigadier general who assented to the attorneys resignation.

The U.S. and Russia put forward conflicting U.N. resolutions about extending the mandate of the body investigating uses of chemical weapons in Syria, the AP reported. Last week, Russia vetoed an extension of the Joint Investigative Mechanisms (JIM) mandate for another year. The Russian resolution only renews the JIMs mandate for six months while the U.S. resolution would extend the bodys authority for two years. Last week, the latest JIM report blamed the Syrian government for the April sarin gas attack in Khan Sheikhoun.

The International Criminal Courts prosecutor will seek to open an investigation into war crimes in Afghanistan, Reuters reported. Fatou Bensouda said she had a reasonable basis to believe war crimes and crimes against humanity occurred in the course of the sixteen-year long war in Afghanistan.

Defense News Matt Bodner and Aaron Mehta explained how a minor Pentagon research project led Vladimir Putin to warn the U.S. was planning biological warfare.

Politicos Josh Meyer wrote about how Carter Page and George Papadopoulos interactions with Russians linked to the Kremlin exemplifies Moscows use of cut-outs.

 

ICYMI: Yesterday on Lawfare

Harry Larson explained what immigration detainers are and the legal challenges they face.

Robert Chesney, Sabrina McCubbin and Benjamin Wittes analyzed President Trumps suggestion that the New York attacker be held as an enemy combatant in the context of the chaotic developments in the military detention system.

Mieke Eoyang, Ben Freeman and Benjamin Wittes shared the October 2017 data from the Confidence in Government on National Security Matters project. They also discussed data that supported a troubling conclusion: Republican attacks on the special counsel are affecting public confidence in Muellers inquiry.

Sarah Grant summarized Wednesdays contempt hearing for in the al-Nashiri case at the military commissions..

Vanessa Sauter posted the habeas petition of Brig. Gen. John Baker, the chief defense counsel at the military commissions.

Stewart Baker shared the Cyberlaw Podcast, featuring an interview with Rep. Tom Graves, co-sponsor of the Active Cyber Defense Certainty Act.

Benjamin Wittes posted the Million Dollars in Rugs edition of Rational Security.

 

Email the Roundup Team noteworthy law and security-related articles to include, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook for additional commentary on these issues. Sign up to receive Lawfare in your inbox. Visit our Events Calendar to learn about upcoming national security events, and check out relevant job openings on our Job Board.


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1.1K
  •  
  •