10:19 AM 11/28/2017 – Mueller’s Russia investigation – Google News: Mueller’s Trump-Russia Probe May Be Only One That Leads to Answers-Or Handcuffs – Newsweek

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Trump’s YouTube Videos: Trump Salutes Military Progress on Thanksgiving
 

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President Donald Trump is telling members of the military positioned across the globe that they’re winning big under his watch. He spoke with troops in a teleconference on Thanksgiving Day. (Nov. 23)

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Trump’s YouTube Videos: Donald Trump Jr. and WikiLeaks; Trump Meets Duterte: A Closer Look
 

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Seth takes a closer look at how President Trump spent his trip to Asia cozying up to authoritarian strongmen and new information about the Trump campaigns relationship with WikiLeaks.
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Trump’s YouTube Videos: The Trump Presidency: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
 

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One year after the presidential election, John Oliver discusses what we’ve learned so far and enlists our catheter cowboy to teach Donald Trump what he hasn’t.

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Trump Investigations News Review

Trump Investigations from mikenova (30 sites)
Trump – Russia Investigations – Google News: Mueller’s Trump-Russia Probe May Be Only One That Leads to Answers-Or Handcuffs – Newsweek

Mueller’s Russia investigation – Google News: Mueller’s Trump-Russia Probe May Be Only One That Leads to Answers-Or Handcuffs – Newsweek

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): Just Security: Where Does the Trump Administration Stand on Encryption?
1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Slaughterbots and Other (Anticipated) Autonomous Weapons Problems
elections 2016 russian ads on social media – Google News: Russia and the farce of Facebook – Norfolk Daily News (blog)
russian facebook ads – Google News: Russia and the farce of Facebook – Norfolk Daily News (blog)
1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): Just Security: The Backdoor Search Loophole Isnt Our Only Problem: The Dangers of Global Information Sharing
deutsche bank and trump – Google News: The Finance 202: Trump antagonists and Arizona senators are key to tax plan’s success – Washington Post
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1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): Just Security: The Early Edition: November 28, 2017
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1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): trump and russia – Google News: SitRep: Trump Envoy Sees No End to Russia’s War in Ukraine – Foreign Policy (blog)
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Trump Investigations from mikenova (30 sites)
Trump – Russia Investigations – Google News: Mueller’s Trump-Russia Probe May Be Only One That Leads to Answers-Or Handcuffs – Newsweek
 


New Jersey Herald
Mueller’s Trump-Russia Probe May Be Only One That Leads to Answers-Or Handcuffs
Newsweek
In May, President Donald Trump fired former FBI Director James Comey, implying in an NBC News interview that the decision was partly due to the bureau’s Russia investigation. About a week later, the Justice Department appointed special counsel Mueller, …
Russia probes in Congress likely to spill into 2018New Jersey Heraldall 5 news articles »

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Mueller’s Russia investigation – Google News: Mueller’s Trump-Russia Probe May Be Only One That Leads to Answers-Or Handcuffs – Newsweek
 


New Jersey Herald
Mueller’s Trump-Russia Probe May Be Only One That Leads to Answers-Or Handcuffs
Newsweek
In May, President Donald Trump fired former FBI Director James Comey, implying in an NBC News interview that the decision was partly due to the bureau’s Russia investigation. About a week later, the Justice Department appointed special counselMueller, …
Russia probes in Congress likely to spill into 2018New Jersey Heraldall 5 news articles »

Mueller’s Russia investigation – Google News

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): Just Security: Where Does the Trump Administration Stand on Encryption?
 

The circumstances are familiar: a deceased criminal, a locked phone, a determined FBI and a defiant tech company.

After Devin Kelley murdered 26 people at the Sutherland Springs First Baptist Church in Texas earlier this month, law enforcement obtained a warrant to search his phone, reportedlyan Apple iPhone. But, they say, they cant get access to its encrypted contents because they dont have the passcode. The phone has been sent to the FBIs headquarters in Quantico, Virginia for analysis.

We are working very hard to get into the phone, special agent Christopher Combs told reporters Nov. 7. It could be tomorrow, it could be a week, it could be a month.

The situation echoes the circumstances that arose after the San Bernardino mass shooting in December 2015, when the FBI and Apple faced off in a tense legal and political fight over encryption. Back then, the FBI successfully asked a court to order Apple to write new software to allow them to bypass a security feature, which would wipe the phones data after 10 failed passcode attempts. Apple refused, arguing that creating a tool to hack the phone would undermine everyones security. Eventually, the FBI relented, paying a third party over $1 million to unlock the phone. The so-called crypto-wars cooled off.

Even before the Sutherland Springs shooting, there were signs the fight over encrypted communications was making a comeback. At the end of the summers G-20 meeting, world leaders issued a statement on countering terrorism. In its second-to-last paragraph, the document encouraged collaboration with industry to provide lawful and non-arbitrary access to available information where access is necessary for the protection of national security against terrorist threats.

Behind the carefully crafted diplomatic language an old battle rears its head: the crypto-wars. While the question of what to do with encrypted communications may have largely dropped out of the U.S. headlines after the FBI found its San Bernardino work-around, the problem at the heart of it has not been resolved.

Indeed, the encryption debate is still raging abroad. In Britain, Home Secretary Amber Rudd is calling for access to WhatsApp messages in the wake of terror attacks in Manchester and London. The Investigatory Powers Act, passed late last year, may empower the government to demand companies to break their encryption via technical capability notices. The law followed earlier suggestions by Prime Minister David Cameron that he would ban encryption entirely. In Australia, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull announced in July that he will introduce legislation modelled on the UK laws which will require companies to give investigators access to encrypted communications. And in Germany, a law passed in June allows investigators to install malware on devices to allow them to read encrypted communications, after Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere declared that we cant allow here to be areas that are practically outside the law.

For all of these countries, though, the United States is key. The U.S. is home to most of the companies whose popular products figure centrally in these debates – including Apples iPhone, Facebook, and WhatsApp, the Facebook-owned messaging service. Its status as the driving force behind the worlds technological revolution over the last 40 years, combined with its market power and tradition of deep involvement in global issues, means that whatever direction the U.S. moves in the encryption debate will have a significant impact worldwide.

But in the U.S., the issue has grown quieter for now. Ten months into his presidency, President Donald Trump hasnt addressed the question, even as hes offered condolences on mass shootings and promised to fight back hard against terrorism. By saying nothing so far, Trump has maintained the encryption-rich status quo, in which people using end-to-end encrypted services like WhatsApp, iMessage and Facebook messenger can be relatively content that the government isnt reading their communications, even if law enforcement obtained a warrant. But its far from certain that Trump has taken a considered position on the matter (reporting suggests the issue has been controversial within his administration), and its possible he hasnt turned his mind fully to the issue yet, and wont until forced to.

While the question remains unresolved in Washington for now, it wont stay that way. Allies are ratcheting up the pressure on the U.S. to work towards a fix. In addition to the G-20 meeting, the issue was raised at Junes Five Eyes meeting between representatives of the intelligence alliance comprised of the U.S., Canada, Australia, the U.K. and New Zealand. And eventually, perhaps in the next few weeks, another Apple v. FBI will come along and Trump will have to make a choice.

So what do we know about Trumps views and those of his advisers? Here is a look at all of the available clues.

Trumps Personal Views

Trump has never made any policy proposals about encryption. The most salient clue is probably his comments at the time of the Apple/FBI showdown, which were critical of Apple. In an interview on Fox & Friends, he said that Apple should give the FBI access to the phone in question, saying Who do they think they are?” He also suggested a boycott of Apple until they complied with the courts order.

In general, Trump has delivered strong rhetoric on counterterrorism and law enforcement, and has not demonstrated a concern for privacy. He has expressed concern over terrorists using the internet and recruiting people…literally brainwashing people, and opined that terrorists are using the internet better than we use the internet…our people dont have a clue. That said, two incidents have led Trump to advocate for privacy. In March, the president tweeted that Obama had Trumps wires tapped in Trump Tower during the election campaign and described it as McCarthyism. While theres no reason to believe that happened (and plenty of reasons to believe it didnt), his outrage implies a support for privacy rights over invasive investigatory strategies. Separately, Trump expressed anger over former National Security Adviser Susan Rices unmasking of the names of Trump campaign officials who met with the United Arab Emirates crown prince Zayed al-Nahyan in a secret meeting in New York after the election. Again, that position seems to value civil liberties over the demands of intelligence officials.

However, those positions were politically and personally convenient – in reality, they probably werent motivated by a concern for privacy. I think its fair to say that we shouldnt expect him to take a stand for privacy rights or civil liberties (although if special counsel Robert Mueller were to seek access to encrypted communications in the course of his Russia investigation, that could change things).

Trumps Advisers

And what about those around him? Heres where key figures influencing Trump stand:

1. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is a strong anti-encryption voice within the administration. In his confirmation hearing, Sessions said that it was critical that national security and criminal investigators be able to overcome encryption. In a separate congressional hearing, he said the issue was more serious than Apple CEO Tim Cook understood, and could make all the difference in a criminal case or a life and death terrorist case.

2. Other Justice Department figures

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein has been the leading administration voice criticizing strong encryption. He addressed the question elliptically at a congressional hearing in June. Referring to the going dark challenge, Rosenstein said that law enforcements inability to access electronic communications severely impaired investigations and jeopardized public safety, and that the department had to keep adapting to evolving challenges. It wasnt explicit but the suggestion is there – that law enforcement needs greater powers to break encryption. In late August, the message became more explicit: in a speech in Utah Rosenstein cautioned that legislation may be necessary if tech companies dont cooperate. He developed his line of thinking even more in relation to the Devin Kelley case this month, telling an audience in Maryland that encryption costs a great deal of time and money. In some cases, it surely costs lives. In October, he hinted that the tech industry should be coerced into providing a technological solution to this problem. The approach taken in the recent past – negotiating with technology companies and hoping that they eventually will assist law enforcement out of a sense of civic duty – is unlikely to work, he told the U.S. Naval Academy. DOJs National Security Division head Dana Boente, who recently announced his resignation, also addressed the issue briefly at the Aspen Security Forum in July. Boente suggested that the U.S. might sit back and follow Europes lead, saying that The terrorism challenges in Europe are really kind of tough…they may lead the way and carry some of our water on this. Boente painted a picture of a kind of domino effect, where enough countries legislate that tech companies find a technological solution to this policy problem.3. FBI Director Christopher Wray His predecessor James Comey often spoke about the going dark challenge, and he was at the reins of the FBI when it took on Apple. But what about Wray? He hedged his bets at his July confirmation hearing, describing the question as one of the most difficult issues facing the country and urging for a balance to be struck between the importance of encryption and the importance of giving law enforcement the tools they lawfully need to keep us all safe.

4. CIA Director Mike Pompeo wont be a direct decision-maker on the issue but will probably influence where Trump stands. Last year he wrote an op-ed saying that the use of strong encryption in personal communications may itself be a red flag for terrorism, but conceding that a technological backdoor would lead terrorists to communicate via foreign or home-made encryption.

5. NSA Director Adm. Mike Rogers has publicly adopted a strong pro-encryption position. Speaking to the Atlantic Council last year, he said that encryption was foundational to the future, and that it was a waste of time to argue about it. He went on: What weve got to ask ourselves is, given that foundation, whats the best way for us to deal with it? And how do we meet those very legitimate concerns from multiple perspectives?

6. Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats In his confirmation hearing, Coats acknowledged the importance of encryption for security and privacy, and said there needed to be an ongoing conversation about legal authorities to access communications. As a senator, Coats supported the Burr-Feinstein draft law that would have given law enforcement the power to force companies to break into a suspects phone. The ODNIs former general counsel Bob Litt had previously told colleagues that a terrorist attack or criminal event might be the occasion for changing policymakers minds on encryption.

What Next?

Where Trump goes on this issue will probably be influenced by circumstances: In the case of a terrorist attack implicating end-to-end encryption, hell probably want to look tough on national security and may press for a legislative solution. Thats also a real possibility if the FBI pushes the Sutherland Springs issue further, publicly criticizing Apple or again bringing proceedings to try to force them to let them into Kelleys phone.

But if the issue evolves naturally, there is enough division among his advisers that the administration may not take firm action on its own. Its far more likely that the government will follow the playbook of allies who are trying to pass the ball, re-characterizing the issue as a technological problem rather than a policy one, and putting pressure on the tech world to solve it. In countries that are making moves to be able to access encrypted communications, governments seem to be shying away from talking about backdoors. Instead, theyre moving towards a discourse of cooperation and arguing that they want to work with tech companies to create solutions which address the problem. That idea was evident in the language of leaders statement after the G-20 conference, which called for collaboration with industry to provide access to information where necessary for national security. (Never mind that tech companies say theyre already cooperating to the extent they think they can without endangering cybersecurity.) In political terms, its probably fair to say that the FBI lost its battle with Apple, and so will probably be hesitant to take it on so directly again. But if the government drops its adversarial posture, and instead appears conciliatory and asks to work together to find technological solutions to the going dark problem, companies like Apple might lose their political advantage as they appear uncooperative and insensitive to national security concerns.  They would have to persuade the public that there could never be a technological solution that would allow access to terrorists communications while keeping everybody elses secure.

If tech companies remain intransigent, the U.S. may pursue an international solution. Boente hinted at something like this strategy in his address at the Aspen National Security Forum, suggesting that the U.S. could share the political cost of taking action with Europe. One option might be to enter a formal international agreement, as argued for by Australia, whereby allied states would impose coordinated legal obligations on tech companies to hand over communications in response to a warrant. If it seems being a first mover would be too politically difficult, Trump may find cover in being the second or third mover, or the first among many.

Its the policy challenge thats not going away any time soon: Expect the encryption debate to heat up within this presidential term, and possibly even in the coming weeks.  With the governments security heads publicly taking different approaches to the issue, and Trumps own views not obviously settled, its also an unpredictable one. Whichever way Trump moves in the crypto-wars, however, it will be sure to have a major impact on internet freedom and security worldwide.

Read on Just Security »

 Just Security

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Slaughterbots and Other (Anticipated) Autonomous Weapons Problems

The Future of Life Institute recently released Slaughterbots, a seven-minute video that looks like an episode of Black Mirror (a science-fiction anthology show focused on technology-induced nightmares). It describes a near future where a defense contractor develops small autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), the same size as a small toy and armed with a small, explosively formed penetrator (a small explosive which drives a small piece of metal though its victims skull). In short, a slaughterbot. It identifies and kills targets based on preprogrammed criteria and aggregated data. For example, the hypothesized UAVs in this video are capable of breaking a few windows, flying into the Senate and killing senators on only one side of the aisle.The Future of Life Institutes intent is to highlight the anticipated dangers posed by autonomous weapons. But I fear that autonomous weapons are inevitable; this isnt a hypothetical threat tomorrow, it is a real threat today. Simple estimation shows that these weapons would not be difficult to mass-produce. While the technology may not be widely available now, once it is, we are facing an issue of unprecedented scale. Our ability to defend ourselves against a threat like the one illustrated in the video is limited. We need to plan for malicious swarms of autonomous weapons in civilian environments.

First, how easily could one build such a weapon? Some back-of-the-envelope design suggests that I could build the computer necessary to run a slaughterbot, including all the inertial sensors and communications, with two outrider cellphone camerasin a package the size of a sugar cube. Give me a $10 million budget and I could produce slaughterbots with a manufacturing cost of roughly $200 per unit (if Im producing enough of them). After all, the base airframes and camera without the computer cost about $45.

Further amplifying the concern is that everything involvedfrom the silicon chips to the machines neededto crank out tens of thousands of these little nightmaresare available off-the-shelf. With only a little bit of smuggling effort, even North Korea could build such things. And since such systems would be autonomous, there will be no communications between an operator and the device to jam.

Slightly larger drones with two- to three-foot wingspans are even easier to produce. These drones can be cheaply manufactured using a consumer-grade 3-D printer, a vacuum forming table and some components ordered from Amazon; instead of requiring a specialized factory they can be produced in a garage. At that stage, if somebody designs a killer UAV, many people can manufacture them. Drug cartelshave already started producing armed UAVs and the Islamic State is adapting off-the-shelf drones and turning them into bombers.

We are seeing autonomous operations of UAV swarms not just as things in the research lab but also as student competitions among the U.S. military academies, where students develop software to turn their fleet of individual fixed-wings and quadcopters into a unified swarm tasked with defeating another swarm in air-to-air combat. Not only is the hardware growing cheaper and more common, the software understanding needed is no longer exotic; it is within the reach of advanced engineering students.

Defeating swarms of UAVs is a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) level problem in a military environment. The current DARPA program is focused on developing systems that can defend a military convoy from attacking swarms. Although the program intends that the results should be low cost and low collateral damage, a military environment may have an uncomfortably high definition of low.

But there isnt the equivalent research and development aimed at the even more challenging problem that we will face in civilian environmentsenvironments where we cant just open fire with lasers or bullets and where a million-dollar system is considered outrageously expensive. Instead we need systems that are both inexpensive and as safe as possible, so that when an errant round hits someone, it will annoy or injure instead of maim or kill. And we cant have systems classified as secret spread over cities or in the back of police cars.

This is a hard research problem: Governments need to invest the research and development effort now so that, when the need arises, we can crank out anti-drone systems quickly. This effort will require a lot of out-of-the-box thinking. For example, I think that a collaboration between National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) might fit the bill. Using a large number of small grants (something the NSF is best at) in collaboration with DHSs focus on implementation will ensure that promising technologies can be made ready for production.

Because I fear the slaughterbots are coming.

 Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

elections 2016 russian ads on social media – Google News: Russia and the farce of Facebook – Norfolk Daily News (blog)
 


MobileMarketing Magazine
Russia and the farce of Facebook
Norfolk Daily News (blog)
The Russians, as far as we know, bought more than $100,000 in Facebook ads between June 2015 and May 2017. A little more than half was spent after last November, when, obviously, … The Trump campaign spent around $90 million on digital in2016 
Facebook and Twitter agree to work with the UK on Russian ad probeMobileMarketing Magazineall 21 news articles »

elections 2016 russian ads on social media – Google News

russian facebook ads – Google News: Russia and the farce of Facebook – Norfolk Daily News (blog)
 


MobileMarketing Magazine
Russia and the farce of Facebook
Norfolk Daily News (blog)
It doesn’t appear that much of the Russian material was explicitly advocating for Trump’s election, and some of it wasn’t even right wing. One Russian Facebook page highlighted discrimination against Muslims. Another promoted anti-police videos for a
Facebook and Twitter agree to work with the UK on Russian ad probeMobileMarketing Magazine
The UK’s election watchdog is now investigating Google over Russian meddling in BrexitBusiness Insider
Facebook will cooperate with UK investigation into Russian interference in Brexit voteVerdict
Pars Herald (blog) –News World India
all 21 news articles »

russian facebook ads – Google News

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): Just Security: The Backdoor Search Loophole Isnt Our Only Problem: The Dangers of Global Information Sharing
 

The upcoming expiration of Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) has launched a fresh wave of debate on how the statutes backdoor search loophole allows the U.S. government to access Americans communications by searching information gathered on foreign intelligence grounds without a warrant. But while discussion about domestic information sharing is important, a critical element of the debate is missing: the privacy risks posed by global information sharing between the United States and foreign powers. Like its domestic analog, global information sharing may also permit the U.S. government to access and search Americans data without appropriately accommodating their constitutional rights.

The U.S. is party to a number of international information-sharing arrangementsthe most prominent being the Five Eyes alliance. Born from spying arrangements forged during World War II, the Five Eyes alliance facilitates the sharing of signals intelligence among the U.S., the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. These sharing arrangements are memorialized in the United Kingdom-United States Communication Intelligence (UKUSA) Agreement.

Still, little is known about the legal frameworks governing intelligence sharing among the Five Eyes. The UKUSA Agreement has been amended several times, but the most recent publicly available version dates back to 1955. That version of the agreement indicates that the Five Eyes are to share, by default, the products of operations relating to foreign communications, as well as the methods and techniques relating to such operations. An appendix to the agreement further indicates that the Five Eyes are to share continuously, currently, and without request both raw (i.e. unanalyzed) traffic in addition to analyzed end product.

Our limited understanding of how intelligence sharing might operate, particularly in the digital era, is informed by the U.S. governments intelligence programs under Section 702. Through Upstream surveillance, the NSA undertakes bulk interception of Americans international communications, including emails and web-browsing content, as they transit the cables, switches, and routers that constitute the internet backbone. The NSA then searches these communications using tens of thousands of selectors, or keywords. Media reports have revealed that the NSA has access to a U.K. bulk surveillance program similar to Upstream, which intercepts internet traffic as it flows through the undersea cables landing in the U.K. We do not know the extent to which the U.K. intelligence agencies have similar access to information stored within Section 702-derived databases. However, media reports have revealed that the Five Eyes (as well as other foreign partners) have access to databases storing information collected through various NSA programs, including MARINA, a metadata repository, and XKEYSCORE, which uses hundreds of servers around the world to store information acquired under various NSA programs.

Privacy Implications

Intelligence sharing raises significant privacy concerns. Technological advances have dramatically changed both communication methods and signals intelligence capabilities since 1955. The development of new technology, especially the internet, has transformed the way we communicate with each other and increased the amount of information that can be collected by orders of magnitude. As our communications have evolved, intelligence agencies have developed more advanced ways to acquire, store, analyze, and share this information. They can intercept in bulk communications and data transiting the internet. Computers permit revelatory analyses of types and amounts of data that were previously considered meaningless or incoherent. And the internet has facilitated remote access to information, easing sharing between agencies.

Critics of Section 702 note that the NSAs intelligence operations targeting foreigners could sweep in millions of Americans private communications. It is possible that under the UKUSA Agreement, the NSA both shares this information with foreign governments and receives U.S. persons communications that foreign agencies collect. It is not clear, for example, how the Five Eyes exchange raw signals intelligence intercepted in bulkcontinuously, currently, and without requestwhile constraining access to the data of their respective citizens.

The scarcity of information about the Five Eyes alliance compounds these privacy concerns. The U.S. government has not explained how the UKUSA Agreement currently operates, the types of information that the U.S. government accesses, or the rules that constrain U.S. intelligence agencies access to and dissemination of Americans private communications.

This lack of transparency weakens the oversight and accountability mechanisms available to check global intelligence sharing. Absent additional information regarding the UKUSA Agreement and Five Eyes alliance, Americans must rely on a 60-year-old, likely outdated, document; veiled government statements; and media reports to understand how their privacy might be implicated by foreign intelligence practices. Adding to this concern is that while the Five Eyes alliance is the best known intelligence sharing arrangement, the U.S. is also party to many more.

Privacy International, together with Yale Law Schools Media Freedom & Information Access Clinic, is currently pursuing litigation under the Freedom of Information Act to obtain the updated text of the UKUSA Agreement and its minimization procedures. To date, however, the NSA, the agency primarily responsible for signals intelligence, has not yet disclosed any responsive records. (A similar request to the U.K.s Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ)the British signals intelligence agencywas denied on grounds that GCHQ is entirely exempt from the U.K.s freedom of information framework.)

Privacy advocates concerned about Section 702 should therefore broaden their attention to the privacy risks inherent in global information sharing. The U.S. government should make available the text of the current version of the UKUSA Agreement, as well as related implementing procedures. It should also make public subsequent revisions to the UKUSA Agreement and other agreements governing intelligence sharing with foreign parties. And to the extent that these documents reveal that the U.S. government receives Americans information without appropriate procedural safeguards, lawmakers should demand additional privacy protective restrictions.

As Congress turns its attention to Section 702, we should not ignore the privacy risks posed by longstanding international intelligence sharing practices that proposed domestic reforms will not touch. Without more information about the legal underpinnings of these agreements, and how they operate in practice, we cannot adequately protect the privacy of Americans and foreigners alike.

Image: Getty Read on Just Security »

 Just Security

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

deutsche bank and trump – Google News: The Finance 202: Trump antagonists and Arizona senators are key to tax plan’s success – Washington Post
 


Washington Post
The Finance 202: Trump antagonists and Arizona senators are key to tax plan’s success
Washington Post
The Post’s Heather Long: Powell “has had formal meetings or calls 50 times this year with the heads of Wall Street investment banks such as Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, Wells Fargo and Deutsche Bank, according to a copy of his calendar through Sept.and more »

deutsche bank and trump – Google News

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): trump anxiety – Google News: Unprecedented power consolidation by Xi Jinping triggering anxiety: Hillary Clinton – Hindustan Times
 

Unprecedented power consolidation by Xi Jinping triggering anxiety: Hillary Clinton
Hindustan Times
The unprecedented consolidation of power by Chinese President Xi Jinping has triggered anxiety about bullying by a more assertive China among its neighbours, according to former US secretary of state Hillary Clinton. The Democratic Party … The 70  

 trump anxiety – Google News

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): Trump anxiety – Google News: Unprecedented power consolidation by Xi Jinping triggering anxiety: Hillary Clinton – Hindustan Times
 


Hindustan Times
Unprecedented power consolidation by Xi Jinping triggering anxiety: Hillary Clinton
Hindustan Times
The unprecedented consolidation of power by Chinese President Xi Jinping has triggered anxiety about bullying by a more assertive China among its neighbours, according to former US secretary of state Hillary Clinton. The Democratic Party … The 70 
Xi Jinping’s consolidation of power ‘triggering anxiety‘, says Hillary ClintonSouth China Morning Post
China and the US are moving closer to a trade warBusiness Insiderall 75 news articles »

 Trump anxiety – Google News

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): Anthony Weiner – Google News: FLASHBACK: Al Franken Said Anthony Weiner’s Resignation Was ‘Right Thing To Do’ – Mediaite
 


Mediaite
FLASHBACK: Al Franken Said Anthony Weiner’s Resignation Was ‘Right Thing To Do’
Mediaite
In 2011 Sen. Al Franken said Anthony Weiner‘s resignation was ‘the right thing to do. Franken made the remark in an interview with Think Progress when he was asked about an apparent double-standard in how Weiner had been forced to step down from his … 

 Anthony Weiner – Google News

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): Donald Trump: Trump Has A History Of Peddling Racist Rhetoric About Native Americans

President Trumps Pocahontas slur is just the example in his history of racist remarks aimed at Native Americans.

 Donald Trump

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): Trump – Google News: A speech, a Tillerson snub and a palace dinner Ivanka Trump’s whirlwind India tour – Washington Post
 


Washington Post
A speech, a Tillerson snub and a palace dinner Ivanka Trump’s whirlwind India tour
Washington Post
HYDERABAD, India Ivanka Trump is only scheduled to be in India for two days, but her short trip dubbed a royal visit by the Indian media has been already peppered with controversies like studs on one of her made-in-China handbags. She 
India’s Hyderabad gets a makeover for Ivanka TrumpBBC News
Ivanka Trump’s pushes ‘women first, prosperity for all’ in IndiaNBCNews.com
Ivanka Trump Visits India Amid Criticism Of Clothing Line’s Labor PracticesHuffPost
CNN
all 728 news articles »

 Trump – Google News

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): trump as danger to National Security – Google News: Your daily 6: Ash and airport don’t mix, students turn in teacher and will Flynn make a deal? – STLtoday.com
 


STLtoday.com
Your daily 6: Ash and airport don’t mix, students turn in teacher and will Flynn make a deal?
STLtoday.com
… stayed because they felt safe or didn’t want to abandon livestock. They have also warned people of the danger of mudflows from the volcano as it’s now rainy season in Bali.s report. …. The lawyer for President Donald Trump’s former national and more »

 trump as danger to National Security – Google News

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): Just Security: The Early Edition: November 28, 2017
 

Before the start of business, Just Security provides a curated summary of up-to-the-minute developments at home and abroad. Heres todays news.

SYRIA

A new round of U.N.-backed Syria peace talks in Geneva are scheduled to start today, ahead of the talks the U.N. Special Envoy for Syria Staffan de Mistura called for real diplomacy and for Syrians to begin to find some common ground. The UN News Centre reports.

The talks are expected to focus primarily on a new constitution and elections, however there is little optimism that the talks would lead to a political solution to the Syrian conflict and there are questions over the ability of the groups opposed to the Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to put on a united front. Barbara Bibbo reports at Al Jazeera.

Our goal in the negotiation will be the departure of Bashar al-Assad from the beginning of the transition, Nasr Hariri, the head of the Syrian High Negotiations Committee (H.N.C.), which constitutes the opposition delegation, said yesterday. Stephanie Nebehay reporting at Reuters.

The Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim warned that Turkey could renege on its agreement with the E.U. on refugees if the U.S. and E.U. grant the Y.P.G. a role in the Geneva talks, saying after a meeting with the British Prime Minister Theresa May yesterday that Turkey sees the Y.P.G. as a terrorist organization and [it] has no place in the peace process. Patrick Wintour reports at the Guardian.

The Pentagon stopped short of saying that it would halt the supply of weapons to Syrian Kurdish (Y.P.G.) militia after Turkeys foreign ministry said on Friday that Trump had pledged to stop providing weapons to the group which heads the Syrian Democratic Forces (S.D.F.), with Pentagon spokesperson Col. Robert Manning saying yesterday that the Defense Department would be reviewing pending adjustments to the military support provided to our Kurdish partners. Ellen Mitchell reports at the Hill.

Russia proposed a two-day ceasefire yesterday in the rebel-held Eastern Ghouta area near the capital of Damascus following reports of civilian deaths, the U.K.-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights saying that 18 were killed by bombing over the past two days. Reuters reports.

The shelling of the Eastern Ghouta area has been less intense following the Russian ceasefire proposal, according to witnesses and a war monitor, however there have been no indications that a ceasefire has been agreed. Reuters reports.

Russias defense ministry yesterday denied reports that it carried out airstrikes on the Islamic State-held village of Al Shafah in the Deir al-Zour province after the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said 53 civilians were killed by Russian strikes, the ministry saying in a statement that Russian forces target areas outside population centers, and only facilities of the international terrorist groups. The BBCreports.

The Syrian oppositions stance is seen by Assad and his allies as being unrealistic as pro-Syrian government forces have achieved a series of military victories and the rebels have almost been defeated, while the opposition have accused the Syrian government of refusing to seriously engage. Angus McDowall explains at Reuters why there is little prospect of success at the Geneva talks.

The image of Assad and Russian President Vladimir Putin hugging in the Russian city of Sochi last week symbolizes the power dynamics in the Syrian conflict and Russias success in supporting the Assad regime, with Putin having been able to marginalize the U.S. and enlist the support of Turkey and Iran in his plan for Syria Russias achievements signaling an acceleration of the collapse of U.S. global leadership. The Washington Post editorial board writes.

NORTH KOREA

[We] cannot rule out the possibility Pyongyang may declare the completion of their nuclear program in a year, South Koreas Unification Minister Cho Myoung-gyon said today, Reuters reporting.

Japan has detected radio signals that signal the preparations for a possible North Korean ballistic missile launch, a Japanese government source said today, however noting that the signals are not unusual and are not enough to determine if there would be a launch soon. Reuters reports.

Russias Deputy Foreign Minister welcomed the fact that North Korea has not tested any weapons for more than two months during a visit to South Korea yesterday, however the pause in testing may be seasonal, rather than strategic and a full resumption may come in February. Adam Taylor observes at the Washington Post.

The U.S. and China must bridge gaps on key questions regarding North Korea before any lasting resolution the crisis becomes likely, including their approach to the Pyongyang regime and how they intend to bring North Korea to the negotiation table. Krishnadev Calamur writes at the Atlantic.

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION FOREIGN POLICY

Trumps foreign policy reflects current realities because it acknowledges what many experts have not yet grasped: that Americas post-Cold War national strategy has run out of gas. Walter Russell Mead writes at the Wall Street Journal, arguing that Trumps approach understands the limitations of U.S.s role, however the president must do more than demolish the old.

The Foreign Service is facing perhaps its greatest crisis, as the U.S. juggles with a plethora of national security challenges and complicated dynamics in conflicts in the Middle East, the Trump administration has weakened the Foreign Service by a series of misguided decisions since taking office. Former ambassadors Nicholas Burns and Ryan C. Crocker write at the New York Times, warning about the impact of deep cuts at the State Department.

The dynamics of power in the Middle East may provide Trump with the zero-sum game that he has wanted, however nuance regarding Saudi Arabia and Irans respective influence in the region is needed to try and defuse tensions. Ishaan Tharoor provides an analysis at the Washington Post.

The possibility of the presidents daughter Ivanka Trump becoming the U.S. ambassador to the U.N. is not as preposterous as it would initially seem, the current ambassador Nikki Haley did not have expertise on the U.N. but has proven to be capable, Ivanka Trump could prove similarly capable and has some of the qualities to make a good ambassador. Richard Gowan writes at POLITICO Magazine.

TRUMP-RUSSIA

Lawyers for Trumps former national security adviser Michael Flynn met with members of special counsel Robert Muellers team yesterday, raising the possibility that Flynn is preparing to negotiate a plea deal with prosecutors, however a member of Trumps legal team said that no one should draw the conclusion that this means anything about Gen. Flynn cooperating against the president. Matthew Mosk, Mike Levine and Brian Ross report at ABC News.

Flynn was involved in a project to build nuclear power plants in Egypt and Israel in partnership with Russia interests in June 2015, revealing another instance where Flynn may have had a personal interest in a project while he was advising Trump during the campaign for the presidency, and creating further potential legal questions in the wide-ranging investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Michael Kranish, Tom Hamburger and Carol D. Leonnig report at the Washington Post.

The U.S. needs to come to terms with substantial evidence that the president is in thrall to a foreign power, Michelle Goldberg writes at the New York Times, pointing to the cast of shady characters surrounding the president and the evidence of cooperation with the Kremlin documented in Luke Hardings new book Collusion.

RUSSIA

A Russian interception of a U.S. aircraft at the weekend was unsafe, a spokesperson for the Pentagon said yesterday, adding that the U.S. aircraft was operating in international airspace and did nothing to provoke this Russian behavior. Ryan Browne reports at CNN.

Trumps tweets at the weekend attacking C.N.N. came hours after Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a law requiring certain U.S. media outlets working in Russia to register as foreign agents, there are concerns about the implications of the requirement to register. Michael M. Grynbaum observes at the New York Times.

The Trump administration has two differing approaches to Russia, and is incoherent on Russias role in Ukraine, U.S.-Russia relations, Russias strategy in Syria and on a host of other issues. Susan B. Glasser writes at POLITICO Magazine referring to her interview of the U.S. Ambassador to Russia, Kurt Volker.

LEBANON

The Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri said yesterday that he does not wish to discuss the details of the events following his resignation announcement on Nov. 4 from the Saudi capital of Riyadh, having now deferred his decision to resign. There has been intense speculation surrounding the situation and Hariri cited the destructive role of Iran and its Lebanese Shiite Hezbollah ally as the reason for his resignation. Al Jazeera reports.

Lebanon cannot resolve a question like Hezbollah which is in Syria, Iraq, everywhere because of Iran, Hariri also said yesterday, adding that he would stay on as Prime Minister if Hezbollah accepted to stick by Lebanons policy of staying out of regional conflicts. Reuters reporting.

EGYPT

The residents of the village of Rawda in Egypts Sinai Peninsula had been expecting an attack after months of increased threats, however they did not expect an attack as savage as the massacre on the mosque on Friday which killed at least 305 people. Sudarsan Raghavan and Heba Farouk Mahfouz explain at the Washington Post.

The mosque that was attacked had a Sufi character, many of the media reports have misrepresented Sufisms qualities and its role within mainstream Islamic thought. H.A. Hellyer writes at the Guardian, saying that the rhetoric deployed by many purist Salafis that push narratives about Sufism should be addressed if there is to be a counter-extremism approach.

IRAQ

The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for a suicide attack southeast of Baghdad yesterday, killing 35 members of the Shiite paramilitary Popular Mobilization Forces, Reuters reports.

U.S.-led airstrikes continue. U.S. and coalition forces carried out 11 airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Syria and Iraq between November 24 and November 26. [Central Command]

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

The Pentagon was unable to explain inconsistencies regarding the number of U.S. troops in conflicts in the Middle East and elsewhere yesterday, the spokesperson Col. Robert Manning attempted to set out why there are discrepancies between official statements and statistics available on government-operated websites. Alex Horton reports at the Washington Post.

U.S. airstrikes on the Islamic State group in northeast Somalia killed one militant, the U.S. military said yesterday, Rebecca Kheel reports at the Hill.

Broadcasts on Iranian state T.V. of a U.S. citizen and a British-Iranian citizen at the weekend suggest that Tehran has been trying to pressure the U.S. and U.K., the two detainees have been sentenced on espionage charges. Carol Morello reports at the Washington Post.

Today we are discovering a fifth estate that makes claims but up until now does not want to take any social responsibility, the head of Germanys domestic agency said yesterday, criticizing tech giants like Facebook for hiding behind legal privileges to avoid taking over editorial verification of their content. Reuters reporting.

The Islamic State may regroup in the Philippines since it has suffered territorial losses in Syria and Iraq, Patrick B. Johnston and Colin P. Clarke write at Foreign Policy, saying that the siege of the Philippine city of Marawi by militants supportive of the terrorist group may be a taste of things to come.

Read on Just Security »

 Just Security

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): trump russian candidate – Google News: Jeff Sessions’s ‘failure to recall’ gives defense lawyers new argument in police shooting case – Washington Post
 

Jeff Sessions’s ‘failure to recall’ gives defense lawyers new argument in police shooting case
Washington Post
In the November hearing, Sessions acknowledged for the first time that he remembered a meeting where a foreign policy adviser, George Papadopoulos, floated a possible meeting between then-candidate Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin …and more »

 trump russian candidate – Google News

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): former FBI agents power influence – Google News: What happens when the media gets it really wrong – CNN
 


CNN
What happens when the media gets it really wrong
CNN
Unearthing proof of Nixon’s misconduct required the combined efforts of federal prosecutors, FBI agents, committees of both houses of Congress, and the Supreme Court. The notion that the reporting of Woodward and Bernstein toppled Nixon is one of the and more »

 former FBI agents power influence – Google News

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): Donald Trump: Alec Baldwin Becomes ‘Professor Of Trumpology’ In Iowa Trump Roast

The actor also struck a serious tone with a call to action for Democrats.

 Donald Trump

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): Trump and Russia – Google News: SitRep: Trump Envoy Sees No End to Russia’s War in Ukraine – Foreign Policy (blog)
 

SitRep: Trump Envoy Sees No End to Russia’s War in Ukraine
Foreign Policy (blog)
Ukraine grinds on. The Trump administration’s envoy tasked with ending the fighting in Ukraine tells Politico that he sees no end to the war there, which pits government troops against Russian-backed separatists and Russian troops. Ambassador Kurt …and more »

 Trump and Russia – Google News

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites): trump and russia – Google News: SitRep: Trump Envoy Sees No End to Russia’s War in Ukraine – Foreign Policy (blog)
 

SitRep: Trump Envoy Sees No End to Russia’s War in Ukraine
Foreign Policy (blog)
Ukraine grinds on. The Trump administration’s envoy tasked with ending the fighting in Ukraine tells Politico that he sees no end to the war there, which pits government troops against Russian-backed separatists and Russian troops. Ambassador Kurt …and more »

 trump and russia – Google News

1. Trump from mikenova (196 sites)

Trump digital operations from mikenova (2 sites): social media in trump campaign – Google News: The Daily 202: Trump keeps giving in-kind contributions to Elizabeth Warren’s 2020 campaign-in-waiting – Washington Post
 


Washington Post
The Daily 202: Trump keeps giving in-kind contributions to Elizabeth Warren’s 2020 campaign-in-waiting
Washington Post
Busby, who was lacking any formal campaign structure or even a working website as of Monday morning, said he is counting on social media to spread the word about his campaign. He said he plans to run as an independent on his record as an investment …and more »

 social media in trump campaign – Google News

Trump digital operations from mikenova (2 sites)

POTUS and VPOTUS Official Portrait

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