9:58 PM 12/1/2017 – “But justice roll down like waters and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream” Amos 5:24

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“But justice roll down like waters and righteousness like an ever-flowing  stream” Amos 5:24

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James Comey Tweets Biblical Verse About Mike Flynn The Forward
Congressmen say Jared Kushners arrest is coming and Donald Trump will be ousted from office
Michael Flynn Will Keep Military Rank And Pension Despite Guilty Plea
Psychiatrists warn Trump becoming more mentally unstable
Psychiatrists warn Trump becoming more mentally unstable, putting US, world at ‘extreme risk’ – CNBC
Mike Flynn – Google News: Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI, is cooperating with Mueller – WLS-TV
Russia investigation ‘wearing’ on White House, despite spin – Lincoln Journal Star
Recent Posts – 6:01 PM 12/1/2017
Recent Posts 6:01 PM 12/1/2017
Michael Flynn’s Russia Timeline – FactCheck.org
Flynn guilty plea boosts impeachment talk but it’s premature. We need facts on Russia. – USA TODAY
A Timeline Of Michael Flynn’s Questionable Interactions With Russia
Breaking down Flynn’s lies about his Russia calls – CNN
Is Tom Cotton the Future of Trumpism?
10 Horrifying Facts About GOP Senator Tom Cotton
Mike Flynn Wasn’t Robert Mueller’s ‘Big Fish.’ Why The Trump Team Should Be Worried.
Obama issues a warning in India: ‘Think before you tweet’ – Washington Post
Hey, birds: do you think before you tweet? – Google Search
Hey, birds: do you think before you tweet? – Google Search
Flynn enters guilty plea, will cooperate with Mueller – The Hill
White House work orders show infiltration of mice, roaches – Fox News
11:52 AM 12/1/2017 – The Operation Silk Road – The World News and Times
11:52 AM 12/1/2017 – The Operation Silk Road – The World News and Times
11:52 AM 12/1/2017 – The Operation Silk Road – The World News and Times
The Operation “Silk Road”: Please, meet (for now) the CIA Director, and our Designated Future President…

Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks
James Comey Tweets Biblical Verse About Mike Flynn The Forward

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Congressmen say Jared Kushners arrest is coming and Donald Trump will be ousted from office

mikenova shared this story from Palmer Report.

So what now? Special Counsel Robert Mueller has cut a plea deal with Michael Flynn, who is testifying that Donald Trump and Jared Kushner ordered him to be the point man for communicating and conspiring with the Russian government during the election. If Flynn has the evidence to back up those assertions, things will never be the same. Two U.S. Congressmen are weighing in on the matter, and they’re painting a particularly dire picture for Kushner and Trump both.

After the news broke that Michael Flynn was implicating Jared Kushner, and that Kushner had met with Robert Mueller just before it was revealed that Flynn had cut a deal, Congressman Ted Lieu posted this on Twitter: “My prediction? The next time agents & prosecutors for Special Counsel Mueller interview #Kushner, they will read him his Miranda rights.” Lieu is a Democrat, and he’s been publicly rooting for the demise of Kushner and Trump all year. But it needs to be pointed out that Lieu has a history as a military prosecutor in the Air Force, and he currently sits on the House Judiciary Committee (where the impeachment process begins), so this isn’t arbitrary cheerleading. Congressman Lieu knows what he’s talking about from a legal perspective.

Then there’s Congressman Jared Huffman, who saw the news about Flynn implicating Trump in the Russia conspiracy, and responded in this manner: “Let me be the first to congratulate President Pence.” Huffman is a Democrat, and the last thing he wants is to see a far-right extremist like Mike Pence in the Oval Office. However, he understands the urgency of ousting Trump, a mentally unstable traitor. He also knows that Pence is guilty as sin in the Russia scandal, and can then be ousted as well.

So there you have it. According to the Democrats in Congress, Jared Kushner is about to be arrested, and Donald Trump is going to be ousted from office. Plenty of contrarian political pundits are still insisting that neither of those things will ever happen, but those are the same pundits who told us that Paul Manafort would never be arrested and Michael Flynn would never cut a deal.

The post Congressmen say Jared Kushners arrest is coming and Donald Trump will be ousted from officeappeared first on Palmer Report.

Michael Flynn Will Keep Military Rank And Pension Despite Guilty Plea

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Flynn could commit murder today, and be convicted … and still retain his retired general status with pension, one expert said.

Psychiatrists warn Trump becoming more mentally unstable

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Psychiatrists warn Trump becoming more mentally unstable, putting US, world at ‘extreme risk’ – CNBC

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Psychiatrists warn Trump becoming more mentally unstable, putting US, world at ‘extreme risk’
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… instability in fact, a pattern of decompensation: increasing loss of touch with reality, marked signs of volatility and unpredictable behavior, and an attraction to violence as a means of coping.” “These characteristics place our country and the

Mike Flynn – Google News: Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI, is cooperating with Mueller – WLS-TV

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Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI, is cooperating with Mueller
WLS-TV
And, given the direct involvement of the transition team in Flynn’s calls with Ambassador Sergey Kislyak, the plea also raises questions about the accuracy of repeated assertions by the administration that Flynn had misled Mike Pence and other 
Former national security adviser Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBIWABC-TV

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 Mike Flynn – Google News

Russia investigation ‘wearing’ on White House, despite spin – Lincoln Journal Star

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Russia investigation ‘wearing’ on White House, despite spin
Lincoln Journal Star
“I think that Russia investigation is wearing on all of us, the President most of all,” said a source close to Trump. “But I think he is more concerned about the state of his accomplishments and this presidency.” Flynn’s plea is closest special counsel 
Donald Trump Suspected for Weeks That Mike Flynn Would FlipDaily Beast
Trump’s best and worst day as presidentWashington Post
Does Donald Trump Fear Impeachment After Flynn Plea? President Was Terrified Flynn ‘Turned On Me,’ Report SaysThe Inquisitr

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11:52 AM 12/1/2017 – The Operation Silk Road – The World News and Times Friday December 1st, 2017 at 5:56 PM Public RSS-Feed Of Mike Nova. Created With The PIXELMECHANICS ‘GPlusRSS-Webtool’ At Http://Gplusrss.Com 1 Share 11:52 AM 12/1/2017 – The Operation Silk Road – The World News and Times The World News and Times The World News … Continue reading“Recent Posts – 6:01 PM 12/1/2017”

Michael Flynn’s Russia Timeline – FactCheck.org

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Retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, President Trump’s former national security adviser, pleaded guilty to making false statements to the FBI, the U.S. Special Counsel’s Office announced on Dec. 1.

In his plea agreement, Flynn admitted he lied to FBI agents about two discussions he had with Sergey Kislyak, the Russian ambassador to the United States, in December 2016 when Flynn was still a private citizen and before Trump took office.

In the first instance, Flynn — who was interviewed by FBI agents on Jan. 24 — admitted he lied to FBI agents about a conversation he had with Kislyak on Dec. 22, 2016, about an upcoming U.N. Security Council resolution. Although he initially denied it to FBI agents, Flynn now admits that he asked Russia to delay or defeat a U.N. Security Council resolution, approved Dec. 23, 2016, that would have condemned Israel’s building of settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem. The Obama administration had agreed to allow the resolution to come up for a vote over the objection of Israel.

The incoming Trump administration opposed the U.N. resolution, and Flynn was directed by a “very senior member of the Presidential Transition Team” to contact foreign governments, including Russia … to influence those governments to delay the vote or defeat the resolution,” according to the plea agreement. The “very senior member” of the transition team was not identified.

A day later, the U.N. resolution would pass, with Russia voting in favor and the U.S. abstaining from voting.

Flynn also admitted that he lied to investigators about a Dec. 29 conversation that he had with Kislyak. On the day of the conversation, the Obama administration announced sanctions against Russia in response to Russia’s meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Flynn called to discuss the new sanctions with “a senior official” of the Trump transition team “who was with other senior members of the Presidential Transition Team at the Mar-a-Lago resort” that Trump owns in Florida.

Immediately after the call to Mar-a-Lago, Flynn called Kislyak and “requested that Russia not escalate the situation and only respond to the U.S. Sanctions in a reciprocal manner,” the plea agreement said. Kislyak agreed that Russia would “moderate its response to those sanctions” as a result of his request, according to the U.S. special prosecutor’s office.

But, when interviewed by the FBI on Jan. 24, Flynn denied making such a request and could not recall if Kislyak agreed to his request.

The former White House aide also acknowledged that he made “false statements and omissions” on documents filed with the Justice Department regarding payments that his company, the Flynn Intel Group Inc., received for lobbying work that principally benefited the government of Turkey, according to the plea agreement. Flynn retroactively filed foreign lobbying reports on March 7 for work that he did during the presidential campaign in 2016.

Flynn is now cooperating with the special prosecutor’s investigation into Russia’s efforts to influence the 2016 presidential campaign and whether there was any coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Below are some key events in the Russia investigation involving Flynn from our larger story, “Timeline of Russia Investigation.”

2015

Dec. 10 — Retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn speaks at RT’s anniversary conference in Moscow. RT is a Russian government-funded TV station once known as Russia Today. Flynn, who would become a foreign policy adviser to Trump during the campaign and national security adviser in the Trump administration, sits next to Russian President Vladimir Putin at the event.

In remarks at the event, Flynn is critical of the Obama administration’s foreign policy and supportive of working with Russia to battle ISIS. (It is later learned that he was paid $45,000 for his appearance, and failed to report the income on his government financial disclosure forms.)

2016

Feb. 26 — Reuters reports that Flynn “has been informally advising Trump” on foreign policy during the presidential campaign.

Aug. 17 — Trump receives his first intelligence briefing at FBI headquarters in New York City. He is joined by Flynn and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie.

Nov. 8 — Trump is elected 45th president of the United States.

Nov. 10 — Trump meets with President Barack Obama at the White House. Obama reportedly warns Trump against hiring Flynn.

Nov. 18 — The president-elect selects Flynn as his national security adviser.

Dec. 1 — Flynn and Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and adviser, meet with Kislyak, the Russian ambassador, at Trump Tower. (The White House did not acknowledge the meeting occurred until it was disclosed in March 2017. In a statement to congressional investigators on July 24, 2017, Kushner described the contents of the meeting. He said Kislyak “wanted to convey information from what he called his ‘generals’” about “U.S. policy in Syria.” Kushner said the exchange of information did not occur at that time because neither party could arrange a secure line of communication. “I asked if they had an existing communications channel at his embassy we could use where they would be comfortable transmitting the information they wanted to relay to General Flynn. The Ambassador said that would not be possible and so we all agreed that we would receive this information after the Inauguration,” Kushner’s statement reads.)

Dec. 22 — Flynn calls Kislyak and asks if Russia would delay or defeat an upcoming U.N. Security Council resolution vote that sought to condemn Israel’s building of settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem. The Obama administration agreed to allow the resolution to come up for a vote — angering Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. (A day later, the U.N. resolution would pass, with Russia voting in favor and the U.S. abstaining from voting.)

Dec. 29 — With less than a month remaining in office, Obama announces “a number of actions in response to the Russian government’s aggressive harassment of U.S. officials and cyber operations aimed at the U.S. election in 2016.”

In a phone call with Kislyak, Flynn asks that Russia refrain from retaliating to the U.S. sanctions. Kislyak agrees that Russia would “moderate its response to those sanctions” as a result of his request, according to charges later filed against Flynn by the U.S. special prosecutor’s office. (Flynn’s conversation with the Russian ambassador would not become public until next year.)

Dec. 30 — Russian President Putin issues a statement saying that Russia would not retaliate for the U.S. sanctions. Putin says he hoped to improve relations with the United States “based on the policies of the Trump Administration.”

Trump tweets, “Great move on delay (by V. Putin) – I always knew he was very smart!”

2017

Jan. 12 — The Washington Post reports that Flynn and Kislyak spoke on Dec. 29, the day that the U.S. announced new sanctions on Russia in response to the cyberattacks during the 2016 presidential election. Incoming White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer denies that the call was about U.S. sanctions. “The call centered on the logistics of setting up a call with the president of Russia and the president-elect after he was sworn in,” Spicer said. “And they exchanged logistical information on how to initiate and schedule that call. That was it, plain and simple.”

Jan. 15 — Vice President-elect Mike Pence says Flynn and Kislyak did not discuss U.S. sanctions on Russia. “They did not discuss anything having to do with the United States’ decision to expel diplomats or impose censure against Russia,” Pence says.

Jan. 20 — Trump is inaugurated as the 45th president of the United States.

Jan. 22 — On the same day that Flynn is sworn in as the national security adviser, the Wall Street Journal reports that U.S. counterintelligence agents have investigated Flynn’s communications with Russian officials.

Jan. 24 — Two days after he takes office as national security adviser, Flynn is interviewed by FBI agents. He is asked about two conversations that he had with Kislyak, the Russian ambassador to the United States, in December 2016 when Flynn was still a private citizen and before Trump took office.

Flynn tells the FBI agents that he did not ask Kislyak, in a Dec. 29, 2016, conversation, for Russia to refrain from retaliating after the Obama administration announced sanctions that day against Russia for interfering in the 2016 elections. He also says that he did not ask Kislyak, in a Dec. 22, 2016, conversation for Russia to delay or defeat a U.N. Security Council resolution, approved Dec. 23, 2016, that would have condemned Israel’s building of settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem. Flynn would later plead guilty to lying to the FBI about both of those conversations with Kislyak.

Jan. 25 — The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence announces that it will investigate Russia’s efforts to influence the 2016 presidential election and “any intelligence regarding links between Russia and individuals associated with political campaigns.”

Jan. 26 — Acting Attorney General Sally Yates meets with White House counsel Donald McGahn in his office. She tells McGahn that high-ranking administration officials, including Vice President Pence, had made statements “about General Flynn’s conduct that we knew to be untrue.” She was referring to administration statements that Flynn did not discuss U.S. sanctions against Russia with the Russian ambassador. (Her meeting with McGahn would not be disclosed until Yates testified before Congress on May 8.)

Jan. 28 — Trump receives a congratulatory phone call from Putin.

Feb. 9 — The Washington Post reports that Flynn “privately discussed U.S. sanctions against Russia with that country’s ambassador to the United States during the month before President Trump took office, contrary to public assertions by Trump officials,” citing unnamed current and former officials.

Feb. 13 – Flynn resigns. He acknowledges that he misled Pence and others in the administration about his conversations with Kislyak, the Russian ambassador. “I inadvertently briefed the Vice President Elect and others with incomplete information regarding my phone calls with the Russian Ambassador,” Flynn says.

Feb. 14 — Trump privately meets with FBI Director James Comey in the Oval Office. Comey says that the president brought up the FBI investigation of Flynn. “He then said, ‘I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go. He is a good guy. I hope you can let this go.’ I replied only that ‘he is a good guy.’ … I did not say I would ‘let this go,’” Comey would later recall. (Comey gave this account of his meeting with Trump in written testimony for his June 8 hearing before the Senate intelligence committee. The account was first reported May 16 by the New York Times. The White House issued a statement at that time saying the Times story is “not a truthful or accurate portrayal of the conversation between the president and Mr. Comey.”)

Feb. 15 — A day after Trump reportedly asked Comey to drop the investigation of Flynn, the FBI director tells U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions that “he did not want to be left alone again with the president,” according to a New York Times story published June 6. (Comey also confirms the Times account in his June 8 Senate testimony.)

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus asks FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe if the agency would help the White House knock down news stories about contacts between Trump aides and Russians during the 2016 presidential campaign.

Feb. 16 — Trump is asked at a press conference, “Did you direct Mike Flynn to discuss the sanctions with the Russian ambassador?” He responds, “No, I didn’t. No, I didn’t.”

March 7 — Flynn retroactively registers as a foreign lobbyist for work that he and his company, the Flynn Intel Group, did for a Turkish company during the presidential campaign that primarily benefited the Republic of Turkey. Flynn reports his consulting firm being paid $530,000. According to USA Today‘s report of Flynn’s lobbying work, “the Flynn Intel Group hired researchers to examine Fethullah Gulen, a reclusive Islamic cleric who lives in exile in rural Pennsylvania. [Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip] Erdogan has blamed Gulen’s opposition group for an attempted 2016 coup and has sought his extradition. On Election Day, The Hill newspaper published a Flynn op-ed that called Gulen ‘radical cleric’ and said the U.S. government should ‘not provide him a safe haven.’”

March 30 — Flynn’s attorney, Robert Kelner, says in a statement that his client is willing to testify before Congress if Flynn receives immunity. “General Flynn certainly has a story to tell, and he very much wants to tell it, should the circumstances permit,” Kelner’s statement says.

March 31 — Trump tweets: “Mike Flynn should ask for immunity in that this is a witch hunt (excuse for big election loss), by media & Dems, of historic proportion!”

The White House releases a revised financial disclosure form for Flynn that shows he received speaking fees from RT TV, the Russian television network, and two other Russian firms. Flynn failed to report that income when he initially filed his disclosure form in February.

April 28 – The Senate intelligence committee requests that Flynn turn over any documents relevant to its investigation into the Russian interference with the election. (Flynn declined, and the committee would later subpoena the documents, which Flynn turned over on June 6.)

May 8 — Yates testifies at a Senate hearing that she had two in-person meetings and one phone call with McGahn, the White House counsel, to discuss Flynn’s meetings with Kislyak, the Russian ambassador. Her first meeting with McGahn was on Jan. 26, as mentioned above.

May 9 – Trump fires Comey. A White House statement said that Trump acted “based on the clear recommendations” of Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. In a two-and-a-half-page memo, Rosenstein cited Comey’s handling of the FBI’s investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server for official government business while she was the secretary of state under Obama. Rosenstein criticized Comey for holding a press conference on July 5, 2016, to publicly announce his recommendation to not charge Clinton, and for disclosing on Oct. 28, 2016, that the FBI had reopened its investigation of Clinton.

May 10 — The Senate intelligence committee subpoenas Flynn seeking “documents relevant to the Committee’s investigation into Russian interference with the 2016 election.”

May 11 – Trump says in an interview with NBC’s Lester Holt that he was thinking of “this Russia thing” when he decided to fire Comey. The president says he would have fired Comey with or without Rosenstein’s recommendation. “He made a recommendation, but regardless of recommendation I was going to fire Comey, knowing there was no good time to do it. And, in fact, when I decided to just do it, I said to myself, I said, ‘You know, this Russia thing with Trump and Russia is a made-up story. It’s an excuse by the Democrats for having lost an election that they should have won.’”

May 16 — The New York Times reports that Trump asked Comey at a Feb. 14 dinner meeting to shut down the FBI investigation of Flynn. (See the Feb. 14 entry.)

May 17 — Rosenstein, the deputy attorney general, appoints former FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III as special counsel to investigate any possible collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government’s efforts to influence the 2016 presidential election. Rosenstein makes the appointment instead of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who had recused himself from any federal investigations involving the 2016 election.

May 18 — At a press conference with the president of Colombia, Trump denies that he asked Comey to close down the FBI’s investigation of Flynn. “No. No. Next question,” Trump said.

May 31 — The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence issues subpoenas for testimony, documents and business records from Flynn and Michael Cohen, a personal attorney to the president.

June 6 — Flynn provides more than 600 pages of documents to the Senate intelligence committee, CNN reports. The committee subpoenaed the documents on May 10.

The Washington Post reports that Trump asked Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats in a March 22 meeting “if he could intervene with then-FBI Director James B. Comey to get the bureau to back off its focus on former national security adviser Michael Flynn in its Russia probe.” The report was based on “officials who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive internal matters.” Brian Hale, a spokesman for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, issues a statement that said Coats “never felt pressured by the President or anyone else in the Administration to influence any intelligence matters or ongoing investigations.”

June 8 – Comey testifies under oath before the Senate intelligence committee. As his written testimony detailed, Comey says the president asked him for his loyalty at a Jan. 27 dinner and asked him to drop the Flynn investigation at a Feb. 14 meeting. He also says Trump asked that the FBI “lift the cloud” over his administration and publicly announce that the president is personally not under investigation on March 30 and April 11.

Comey also discloses that he gave a copy of his memo about his meeting with the president on Feb. 14 to a friend with instructions that he share the contents of the memo with a reporter. He says he did so “because I thought that might prompt the appointment of a special counsel.”

Asked if the president’s request to drop the Flynn investigation amounts to obstruction of justice, Comey says: “I don’t know. That — that’s [special counsel] Bob Mueller’s job to sort that out.”

June 9 – At a joint press conference with Romanian President Klaus Iohannis, Trump denies that he told Comey to drop the Flynn investigation. “I didn’t say that,” Trump says. He also says that he never asked Comey to pledge loyalty to him. “I hardly know the man,” Trump says. “I’m not going to say I want you to pledge allegiance.”

June 15 — The Washington Post reports that the FBI and federal prosecutors have been “examining the financial dealings” of Kushner, Flynn, former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and former foreign policy adviser Carter Page.

Dec. 1 — Flynn pleads guilty to making false statements to the FBI and agrees to cooperate with the FBI investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election. “My guilty plea and agreement to cooperate with the Special Counsel’s Office reflect a decision I made in the best interests of my family and of our country,” Flynn says in a statement.

Flynn guilty plea boosts impeachment talk but it’s premature. We need facts on Russia. – USA TODAY

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USA TODAY
Flynn guilty plea boosts impeachment talk but it’s premature. We need facts on Russia.
USA TODAY
Talk of impeaching President Trump surged after Michael Flynn, his former national security adviser and transition aide, pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. But what is the real meaning of the Constitution’s mysterious provision authorizing removal of

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A Timeline Of Michael Flynn’s Questionable Interactions With Russia

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Michael Flynn has been charged with making false statements to the FBI. Here’s how he got to this point.

Breaking down Flynn’s lies about his Russia calls – CNN

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CNN
Breaking down Flynn’s lies about his Russia calls
CNN
The sanctions targeted Russia’s intelligence services and Russian agencies that were involved in cyberactivities. Flynn and Kislyak had phone conversations on December 29, 2016, the day that Obama announced the new sanctions and also expelled 35 
Here’s what Mike Flynn lied to the FBI aboutVICE News
Mike Flynn, Trump and Mar-a-Lago: A timeline on path to guilty pleaPalm Beach Post
Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Lying to FBI About Russia, Appears to Be Cooperating With MuellerSlate Magazine (blog)
theday.com –Daily Beast
all 2,307 news articles »
Is Tom Cotton the Future of Trumpism?

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If you believed the national media, the week of the annual Republican Party fund-raising dinner, in Fort Smith, Arkansas, in late August, was one of the worst of Donald Trump’s Presidency. The President had just responded to the unrest in Charlottesville with statements that appeared sympathetic to neo-Nazi demonstrators, and even some members of his own party were denouncing him. The White House staff was in turmoil, following the departure of Reince Priebus as chief of staff, and the Senate had failed to pass a replacement for the Affordable Care Act. The featured speaker for the evening was the state’s junior senator, Tom Cotton, who seized the chance to address the disquiet in the nation’s capital.

At forty years old, Cotton is the youngest member of the Senate, and he retains the erect posture and solemn bearing that he displayed as a member of the Army’s Old Guard, which presides at military ceremonies, including funerals, in Washington. He’s let his hair grow, a little, since his Army days. When he first ran for office, in 2012—he served a single term in the House of Representatives before winning his Senate seat, in 2014—Cotton was often described as robotic on the stump, but he’s improved somewhat as a speaker, even if he still projects more intelligence than warmth. In this manner, he gave an assignment to the two hundred or so guests in the hotel ballroom.

“Go home tonight and turn on one of the nighttime comedy shows. Tomorrow morning, turn on one of the cable morning-news shows. This Saturday, watch ‘Saturday Night Live,’ ” he said. “All the high wardens of popular culture in this country, they love to make fun of Donald Trump, to mock him, to ridicule him. They make fun of his hair, they make fun of the color of his skin, they make fun of the way he talks—he’s from Queens, not from Manhattan. They make fun of that long tie he wears, they make fun of his taste for McDonald’s.” He went on, “What I don’t think they realize is that out here in Arkansas and the heartland and the places that made a difference in that election, like Michigan and Wisconsin, when we hear that kind of ridicule, we hear them making fun of the way we look, and the way we talk, and the way we think.”

It was, on one level, a breathtaking leap—to equate mockery of a louche New York billionaire with attacks on the citizens of this small, conservative city, which lies across the Arkansas River from Oklahoma. But Cotton’s appeal to his audience for solidarity with Trump, which was greeted with strong applause, represented just one part of his enthusiastic embrace of the President. Stephen Bannon, Trump’s former top strategist and the chairman of the right-wing Web site Breitbart News, told me, “Next to Trump, he’s the elected official who gets it the most—the economic nationalism. Cotton was the one most supportive of us, up front and behind the scenes, from the beginning. He understands that the Washington élite—this permanent political class of both parties, between the K Street consultants and politicians—needs to be shattered.” At the same time, Cotton has maintained strong ties with the establishment wing of the G.O.P. Karl Rove, President George W. Bush’s chief political adviser, told me, “Cotton is not like a Steve Bannon, who wants to blow up the existing structure, uproot the ideology of the Republican Party and replace it with something new. He’s a rising star. He’s capable of building bridges within the Party. He wants to get things done.”

In recent weeks, several Republican Senators have denounced Trump for his intemperance and his dishonesty. Jeff Flake, of Arizona, and Bob Corker, of Tennessee, condemned Trump and announced that they would not seek reëlection in 2018. Ben Sasse, of Nebraska, whose term is not up until 2020, said that, by threatening journalists, Trump was violating his oath to defend the Constitution. Cotton has made a different bet, offering only the gentlest of criticisms of the President. When, in the course of several weeks of conversations, I asked Cotton about one or another of Trump’s controversial statements or tweets, he always responded in the same manner. “The President puts things sometimes in a way that I would not,” he said in early October. “But he was still nominated by our voters and elected by the American people to be our President, and if we want him to accomplish our agenda we need to set him up for success.”

Even Trump’s latest political traumas have not shaken Cotton’s faith in him. Following the indictment of Trump’s former campaign manager Paul Manafort and former campaign adviser Rick Gates, last week, Cotton urged a prompt resolution of the investigation into the Trump campaign, but he did not call for the removal of Robert Mueller, the special counsel. “What’s in the best interest of everyone is for these inquiries to move forward, and to follow them to their proper conclusion as quickly as possible,” Cotton said.

Roby Brock, who hosts the leading public-affairs television program in Arkansas, told me, “From the beginning, Tom could play to both the establishment and the Tea Party. Everyone recognizes he’s got a firm set of conservative principles, but that makes him a polarizing figure. There are a lot of people here, too, who hate him and think he’s the Antichrist. The only thing everyone agrees on is that he wants to be President someday.” To make that next leap, Cotton expresses the militarism, bellicosity, intolerance, and xenophobia of Donald Trump, but without the childish tweets. For those who see Trump’s Presidency as an aberration, or as a singular phenomenon, Cotton offers a useful corrective. He and his supporters see Trump and Trumpism as the future of the Republican Party.

In the early days of the Trump Administration, Cotton exercised influence from behind the scenes. Bannon told me, “He spent a lot of time in my little war room, and he gave us a lot of good advice. He was the one who told us about John Kelly,” the former Marine Corps general who is now Trump’s chief of staff. (The Senator and Kelly had met at a security conference when Cotton was in the House.) In recent months, however, Cotton’s influence has become more apparent, as Trump has embraced some of his most high-profile positions.

In September, President Trump repealed the Obama-era executive order known as DACA, which protected the so-called Dreamers from deportation, but he said that he also wanted Congress to pass a law that would allow them to remain in the United States, even making a preliminary deal with Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi, the Democratic congressional leaders. But, after Cotton spoke out against a quick deal to protect the Dreamers, Trump made a formal proposal to Congress that attached many strings Cotton had demanded. “I had dinner with the President and General Kelly on October 2nd, and we talked about DACA,” Cotton told me. “They said that Chuck and Nancy had done some post-dinner spin, to go along with the post-dinner dessert, about what the President actually agreed to on DACA. I think the fix that the President announced is a better step in the right direction.”

The following month, Trump gave Cotton a victory on the touchstone issue of his Senate career by decertifying Iran’s compliance with the nuclear-arms deal that the Obama Administration had negotiated. “I told the President in July that he shouldn’t certify that Iran was complying with the agreement,” Cotton told me. “Putting aside the issue of technical compliance or noncompliance, it’s clear that the agreement is not in our national interest.” Following Trump’s action, Cotton joined forces with Senator Corker, the chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, on a proposal that, if passed, would likely lead to the termination of the Iran nuclear deal and the reimposition of American sanctions.

“Let there be no doubt about this point,” Cotton said, in a recent speech to the Council on Foreign Relations. “If we are forced to take action, the United States has the ability to totally destroy Iran’s nuclear infrastructure. And, if they choose to rebuild it, we could destroy it again, until they get the picture. Nor should we hesitate if compelled to take military action.” In describing his preferred approach to negotiations with Iran, Cotton said, “One thing I learned in the Army is that when your opponent is on his knees you drive him to the ground and choke him out.” In response, a questioner pointed out that killing a prisoner of war is not “American practice.” (It is, in fact, a war crime.)

Similarly, in North Korea, Cotton supports Trump’s brinkmanship with Kim Jong Un, and excoriates China for its failure to rein in its ally. “Time and time again, Beijing shows that it is not up to being the great power it aspires to be,” Cotton said. (His hostility toward China endears him to the Bannon wing of the Republican Party, which views the U.S.-China relationship as the defining conflict of the modern world.)

Cotton has emerged as such a close ally of the Trump White House that one recent report suggested that the President would name him director of the C.I.A. if Mike Pompeo, the current director, were to replace Rex Tillerson as Secretary of State. (Trump is widely believed to be dissatisfied with Tillerson.) In a conversation in mid-October, Cotton did not dismiss the possibility of taking the C.I.A. job. “I am pleased to be a senator,” he told me. “But, of course, I will always take a call from the President, and he has called me many times.” As a member of Trump’s Administration, Cotton would ratify the President’s instincts. He offers Trump a certainty that matches his own, especially about the threats the nation faces and the best ways to address them.

In August, I visited Cotton in the house where he grew up, in Yell County, Arkansas. When I arrived, Cotton’s father was also walking in the door. Len Cotton did not offer to shake hands right away, because he had just welcomed two newborn calves to the family farm, and he thought it prudent to wash up first.

The Cottons have been in Arkansas for six generations, and Tom’s parents make their living running what’s known as a cow-calf operation, on several plots of land in the Arkansas River Valley. In the specialized world of beef-and-dairy production, the Cottons’ business is the first stage—the production of the cows, which are sold to ranchers. The Cottons have always done some farming, but when Tom was a boy his mother was a public-school teacher and a middle-school principal, and his father worked for state government, doing inspections for the Department of Health. Like most people in Arkansas at the time, Tom’s parents were Democrats. But the leitmotif of Tom Cotton’s political career has been the decline of the Democratic Party among white voters in Arkansas. “The Democratic Party has drifted away from them,” Tom told me, as his parents sat nearby. “Bill Clinton would be repudiated by his own party today. Hillary Clinton repudiated a lot of her husband’s chief accomplishments when he was in office. So that’s a real fundamental story about politics in Arkansas and politics across the heartland.”

Tom had an idyllic boyhood in the town of Dardanelle, centered on sports and school, where he excelled, and he won admission to Harvard. When he arrived in Cambridge, in the fall of 1995, he still had braces on his teeth, though he had grown to a full six feet five; friends remember him as a bit of a loner, at least at first. He was also already a conservative, if not a Republican, as he was not afraid to let his new neighbors know.

Cotton began writing an opinion column for the Crimson, the campus daily, where he made a name for himself as an outspoken dissenter on a liberal campus. Shortly before he graduated, in 1998, Thomas B. Cotton wrote a farewell to his readers. “I never sought to be loved or to be treated justly,” he said. “How could I? I wrote against sacred cows, such as the cult of diversity, affirmative action, conspicuous compassion and radical participatory democracy. I wrote in favor of taboo notions, such as Promise Keepers, student apathy, honor and (most unforgivably) conservativism.” After college, Cotton went to Harvard Law School. He worked in law firms during the summers and landed a clerkship with a federal appeals-court judge.

He appeared headed for a life of prosperous anonymity in law, but the attacks of September 11, 2001, upended his plans. “I was going to play intramural basketball, enjoy my last year in school, and then, in the second week of school, the attacks happened, and that changed my orientation,” he told me. “I spent a lot more time from that point forward thinking about the threat we faced, reading about history, reading military history, started thinking about joining the Army.”

Cotton approached the matter with the careful deliberation that has characterized his career. He decided to take the clerkship he had already accepted, with Judge Jerry Smith, on the Fifth Circuit, then work at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, in Washington, to start paying off his student loans. “I thought he had a great future at the firm,” Bill Kilberg, the partner who supervised Cotton’s work, told me. “Then, one day in 2004, Tom came and said he was thinking about leaving the firm to join the Army. I said, ‘Tom, the Army has plenty of lawyers, they really don’t need you, and it’s not necessary for you to join the Army to serve.’ He said, ‘Oh, no, I’m not going to be a lawyer. I’m going to be an Airborne Ranger.’ And I looked at him and said, ‘Tom, have you talked to your mother about this?’ ”

When I asked Cotton about the decision, he said, “The Army needs lawyers, but that’s not the heart of the Army’s mission. The Army’s mission is the infantry’s mission.” He went on, “So I wanted to do that mission, wanted to do the heart of it. I wanted to lead troops in combat.”

Cotton served with the 101st Airborne Division in Iraq. He led ninety-six-hour patrols in the field, followed by thirty-six-hour stretches at a base near Baghdad. The base had Internet access, and one day in the summer of 2006 Cotton saw that the Times had disclosed, over objections from the Bush Administration, the existence of certain terrorist-surveillance programs. Cotton fired off a letter to the editor, copying several conservative Web sites, and then left on a patrol, where he was cut off from all electronic contact with the United States. “Congratulations on disclosing our government’s highly classified anti-terrorist-financing program,” the letter begins. “I apologize for not writing sooner. But I am a lieutenant in the United States Army and I spent the last four days patrolling one of the more dangerous areas in Iraq.”

The letter combined outrage, overstatement, and savvy politics in a manner that Trump would perfect a decade later. “You may think you have done a public service, but you have gravely endangered the lives of my soldiers and all other soldiers and innocent Iraqis here,” Cotton wrote. “Next time I hear that familiar explosion—or next time I feel it—I will wonder whether we could have stopped that bomb had you not instructed terrorists how to evade our financial surveillance.” He continued, “And, by the way, having graduated from Harvard Law and practiced with a federal appellate judge and two Washington law firms before becoming an infantry officer, I am well-versed in the espionage laws relevant to this story and others—laws you have plainly violated. I hope that my colleagues at the Department of Justice match the courage of my soldiers here and prosecute you and your newspaper to the fullest extent of the law. By the time we return home, maybe you will be in your rightful place: not at the Pulitzer announcements, but behind bars.” When Cotton returned to the base, he learned that the Times hadn’t run the letter but the Web sites had, and the chief of staff of the Army had distributed it to his subordinates.

“I started hearing about Tom when he was still in the military, when I was state chair of our party,” Dennis Milligan, who is now the Arkansas state treasurer, told me. “As chair, you’re always looking for new talent, and people were talking about him even then. They knew he had given up all that money in the law to serve his country.” From Iraq, Cotton was summoned to serve in the Old Guard. (Cotton hoped he had won appointment to the prestigious unit on merit, but the Army had simply summoned the six tallest lieutenants in Iraq.) Later, he volunteered for a tour in Afghanistan, where he won a Bronze Star, before leaving the service, in 2009. After a brief stint working at McKinsey, Cotton returned to Arkansas to run for Congress in his home district. Mike Ross, a Democrat, had retired, and Cotton, campaigning with a heavy emphasis on his military service, won the open seat with about sixty per cent of the vote.

Arkansas, though generally regarded as a Southern state, exists at a crossroads of regions that have been slipping away from Democrats for decades. The booming north, along the Missouri border, has a Midwestern feel, especially because Walmart’s headquarters, in Bentonville, has attracted so many newcomers. The mountainous west owes much to its neighbors in Texas and Oklahoma; the plains of the east and the south, with their cotton fields and rice farms, are conspicuously Southern. “You can tell from the music,” Mark Pryor, a former Democratic senator from Arkansas, told me. “In the mountains, it’s bluegrass and folk music, but in the east and south it’s blues. Memphis is just across the Mississippi. Half of those people at Sun Records were originally from Arkansas.”

Pryor, more than anyone, has lived the recent political evolution of his state. His father, David (governor from 1975 to 1979, and senator from 1979 to 1997), along with Dale Bumpers (governor from 1971 to 1975, and senator from 1975 to 1999), and Bill Clinton (governor from 1979 to 1981 and 1983 to 1992), constitute the gifted political triumvirate that kept the Democratic Party alive in Arkansas after it had faded in nearby states. Clinton, of course, parlayed his moderate liberalism into two terms as President. Mark Pryor was elected state attorney general in 1998, and then won his Senate seat in 2002. Six years later, Republicans didn’t even field an opponent against him. But just six years after that, in 2014, Pryor lost in a landslide to the thirty-seven-year-old Tom Cotton.

“For a long time, Arkansas Democratic politics was kept separate from national Democratic politics,” John Brummett, a political columnist at the Democrat-Gazette, the leading newspaper in the state, told me. “That continued in Arkansas through the nineties and into the two-thousands, because of Clinton. White rural conservatives here could look on the national Democratic Party and see the same guy as President that they were happy enough with in Arkansas.” But the trends that were altering the politics of neighboring states were percolating in Arkansas as well. “ ‘God, guns, and gays’—social issues—were driving white conservatives to the Republicans all along,” Brummett said. “It just exploded when Obama became President.” Before the Obama years, Republicans had won the occasional race in Arkansas; Mike Huckabee was first elected governor in the nineties. But in the past decade the state’s six-person congressional delegation and seven statewide elected officials have gone from nearly all Democrats to all Republicans.

Toxic racial politics contributed to this shift. Max Brantley, a longtime local journalist, now with the Arkansas Times, said, “It is impossible not to see race as a central element in the fall of the Democratic Party here.” After the crisis over the integration of Little Rock Central High School, in 1957, racial politics in the state calmed for a time. This was in part because of the relatively small number of African-Americans; they make up roughly fifteen per cent of the population, as opposed to thirty per cent in the Deep South. “Discrimination was not as evident in Arkansas as it was in other Southern states,” Joyce Elliott, a veteran state senator, said. “It took a black President to bring out the threat.” She added, “I would always say to my liberal white friends, ‘Oh, come on, surely it’s gotten better.’ And they’d say to me, ‘Oh, no, it hasn’t. You can’t believe what white people say about Obama in private—he’s Kenyanhe’s Muslim, they’d call him unprintable racial epithets.’ ” Brantley told me, “You needed to be here to see how quickly the politics changed after Obama came in. He is so deeply disliked here. I think a lot of people in Arkansas thought he was ‘uppity,’ to use the old smear.”

Obama’s Presidency certainly coincided with, if it didn’t directly cause, the decimation of the Democratic Party in Arkansas. Republicans thrived by targeting Obama even in contests that had nothing to do with him. Republican candidates for justice of the peace inveighed against Obamacare, which they never referred to as the Affordable Care Act. When Cotton challenged Pryor, in 2014, he put Obama at the center of his campaign. In one television advertisement, featuring a grainy black-and-white video of Obama, Cotton vowed, “We need a senator who will hold the President accountable.” Another showed Obama saying that he wasn’t on the ballot but his policies were. “President Obama is finally right about something,” Cotton said, in response. A third ad ended with the tagline “Mark Pryor—voting with Obama, voting against Arkansans like you.” Cotton also benefitted from enormous outside spending by conservative groups, including some affiliated with the Koch brothers, who have substantial holdings in Arkansas. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, outside groups spent twenty-three million dollars for Cotton, compared with fourteen million for Pryor.

Cotton rejects the notion that race had anything to do with his victory, or with the rise of the Republican Party in Arkansas. “I don’t think that’s all that different from the intense unpopularity of George Bush in 2006 and 2008,” he told me, in a conversation in his Senate office. “The President’s the head of the Party, he takes up most of the attention in American politics, and when he’s very unpopular opponents in the other party tend to run against him, whether they’re running for the United States Senate or whether they’re running for justice of the peace.” Besides, he said, Democrats in Arkansas had a special reason to disdain Obama: “It wasn’t because Barack Obama was black, it was because Barack Obama stopped the Clinton restoration.”

As reviled as President Obama was in Arkansas, the Affordable Care Act has proved successful and popular in the state. About three hundred thousand people, which amounts to more than ten per cent of the state’s population, have taken advantage of the law to obtain health insurance. The state’s governor, Asa Hutchinson, is a conservative Republican, but he’s urged Congress to protect the money that the state receives under the program. He has, however, made a change. The program is not called Obamacare but, rather, Arkansas Works. It apparently took the removal of the President’s name to make the law palatable to Arkansans.

On the day after I visited Cotton’s family’s home, I told him that I had driven the scenic route back to Little Rock. “That’s because you drove along the Ouachita Mountains, which is the only range in Arkansas that goes west to east,” he said. “It provides more attractive views of the sunset than the north-south ranges.” This was an accurate, if rather bloodless, assessment of the aesthetics of the countryside, one that might be made by “Star Trek” ’s Mr. Spock, whom Cotton, with his air of icy certainty, somewhat resembles.

“I remember the first time I met Tommy,” Trey Gowdy, a South Carolina congressman, told me. “We were debating a medical-malpractice bill on the floor of the House, and he comes up and starts talking about the details of the bill. And I said, ‘First of all, who are you?’ He said he was the new congressman from Arkansas. And I said, ‘You can’t be from Arkansas, because you’re wearing shoes.’ And then he starts telling me to read some law-review article about malpractice by Robert Bork or someone. And I said, ‘Dude, the chess club meets around the corner.’ ” (Gowdy later became a close friend of Cotton and his wife, Anna, a lawyer and former prosecutor.)

Shortly after Cotton was elected to the House, the Senate passed a comprehensive immigration-reform bill, which offered a path to citizenship for some undocumented aliens. Cotton was among the leaders of the successful effort to persuade John Boehner, then the Speaker, to block the bill from even coming up for a vote in the House. When we chatted at the kitchen table of his boyhood home, Cotton explained his opposition. “It was the élite, bipartisan consensus—‘It’s the only possible solution’—another idea which the great and the good in Washington love, but wrongheaded in almost every particular,” he said. “If you live in a big city and you work in an office building, immigration is almost an unalloyed good for you. . . . It makes the price of services that you pay for a little bit more affordable—whether it’s your nanny to take care of your kids for you, or landscaping your yard, or pedicures, manicures, that sort of thing. And you get a lot of exciting new fusion restaurants as well.

“But if you live and work in a community where they have a large illegal-immigrant population that’s straining the public school, that’s clogging up the emergency room when you’re trying to get care, that makes it more dangerous to drive in the roads because people don’t have driver’s licenses or they don’t have insurance, or if they are bidding down the wages or even taking jobs away from you, then it doesn’t look nearly so good,” Cotton said. He endorses Trump’s plan to build a wall on the Mexican border—“Walls work,” he often says—and is a lead sponsor of a bill, strongly supported by the White House, that would cut legal immigration roughly in half. (Cotton’s views on immigration are debatable in every particular. It’s far from clear that a border wall with Mexico would “work” to stop illegal immigration in any meaningful way. Most economists believe that immigrants, legal and otherwise, add more to the economy than they take from it, and that their presence in the labor force does not lead to lower wages over all.)

As a legislator, Cotton has shown little deference to his elders. John Cornyn, the senior senator from Texas, told me that new senators used to sit back for a while. “But Tom proved right away that he was very engaged and knowledgeable,” Cornyn said. “He probably knows more about geopolitics than most senators.” In March of his first year in the Senate, Cotton wrote an open letter to the “Leaders of the Islamic Republic of Iran,” which was co-signed by forty-six other Republican senators, warning the mullahs that Congress might undo any agreement they reached with Obama. The letter was denounced by Executive Branch officials as an attempt to interfere in a diplomatic initiative, but Cotton regards it as a triumph. In his recent speech at the Council on Foreign Relations, he boasted about the letter: “Didn’t I warn the ayatollahs that this deal might not survive if it wasn’t a treaty? I think I did.”

When I asked Cotton what he learned during the Iraq War, he replied, “Security comes first.” He continued, “In 2003, there were a lot of grand ambitions of what a postwar Iraq would look like, and all the different things that needed to happen. And we neglected the most basic thing, which is physical security for the people there and for our troops. You see that now in Afghanistan as well. You see it in so many places around the world. You simply cannot neglect security, and without security there cannot be political compromise and reconciliation, there cannot be good governance, there cannot be economic development, there can’t be anything.”

If Rand Paul is the leading Republican isolationist in the Senate, Cotton, in short order, has become heir to the opposing wing of the Party, the one associated with Senator John McCain, whose efforts to increase the defense budget Cotton has championed. “Tom is a veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan. He’s got mud on his boots,” McCain told me. “That means he has special credibility on those issues, just like the World War Two generation did around here for a long time. We need Tom and people like him.” But Cotton has gone well past McCain in his swaggering belligerence. In a February, 2015, hearing of the Armed Services Committee, Cotton announced that he favored keeping open the detention facility at Guantánamo Bay. “In my opinion, the only problem with Guantánamo Bay is there are too many empty beds and cells there right now,” Cotton said. “We should be sending more terrorists there for further interrogation to keep this country safe. As far as I’m concerned, every last one of them can rot in hell, but as long as they don’t do that they can rot in Guantánamo Bay.” (Even McCain favors closing Guantánamo, which he believes stains the reputation of the United States and serves as a recruitment tool for terrorists.)

During the last days of the Obama Administration, Cotton also helped to sabotage a criminal-justice-reform bill, which had a meaningful chance of passage. Senator Cornyn, the second-ranking Republican, was pushing the bill, which would have ended mandatory minimum sentences for some narcotics offenders. Cotton took the public lead in making statements about the proposal which, as with his comments on Guantánamo, skirted the edge of demagoguery. “I don’t think any Republicans want legislation that is going to let out violent felons, which this bill would do,” Cotton said. His rhetoric helped turn a difficult political challenge into an impossible one, and the Republican leadership in the Senate never even brought the bill up for a vote. Cotton told me, “I think most Arkansans believe they elected me to help keep dangerous people in prison.” Jeff Sessions, Trump’s Attorney General, shares Cotton’s disdain for criminal-justice reform, and the move toward shorter sentences at the federal level has halted.

For some Democrats, however, Cotton made his name in the Senate in a more personally poisonous way. In his first year, Cotton placed a hold on Obama’s nominations for the Ambassadors to Sweden, Norway, and the Bahamas, because of an unrelated dispute regarding the Secret Service. As months passed, Cotton released the holds on the Sweden and Norway envoys—because, he said, those countries were NATO allies—but he prevented a vote on Cassandra Butts, an old friend of the President’s, as the Ambassador to the Bahamas. Butts had been waiting for a Senate vote for eight hundred and thirty-five days when, in May, 2016, she died suddenly, of an undiagnosed cancer. Cotton said, “I feel very badly about her death and the timing of it. I wish the White House had just addressed this much earlier.” Still, Cotton’s actions left a bitter aftertaste for some of his colleagues. “I thought what he did was outrageous,” Richard Durbin, an Illinois Democrat and the assistant minority leader, said. “There is a point where winning a political battle isn’t worth it.”

For the moment, at least, Cotton appears to be a hybrid of insurgent and old guard, who can play successfully to the warring constituencies of the Republican Party. As Bannon put it, “How many guys in town can give a speech at the Council on Foreign Relations and also get kudos in the pages of Breitbart? The answer is, one guy.”

Cotton has carved out a clear Trumpism-without-Trump agenda: limits on immigration throughlegislation, deportations, and a wall; longer prison sentences for American convicts and suspected terrorists abroad; a bigger budget for the Department of Defense. The question is whether he has the charisma to sell that agenda to a broader public. Recently, at his Little Rock office, Cotton presented several medals to the family of George Anderson, a Second World War veteran who had died in 2006. Cotton began with a solemn introduction, but then, unexpectedly, Anderson’s family members, most of whom were elderly, took over the proceedings and began telling stories about George, who had made his living running car washes and coin-operated laundries. Cotton’s staff members and the assembled local reporters began chuckling at the rambling accounts of how George stacked his coins. A more deft politician might have joined in the fun, but Cotton just stood there, seemingly paralyzed by the deviations from good order. The ceremony came to a close when George Anderson’s surviving sister turned to Cotton and said, “As for you—you keep standing up for our President.” ♦

An earlier version of this article included an erroneous anecdote about a dorm-room discussion during Cotton’s freshman year.

10 Horrifying Facts About GOP Senator Tom Cotton

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Hailing from Arkansas, 37-year-old Senator Cotton boasts the title of being the youngest member of the Senate, but he spouts the old warmongering rhetoric of 78-year-old Senator John McCain. From Guantanamo to Iran, food stamps to women’s rights, here are ten reasons why Tom Cotton is a dangerous dude.

1. He penned an underhanded letter to the leaders of Iran that sparked the trending hashtag #47Traitors. On March 9th, Cotton and 46 of his Republican colleagues went behind President Obama’s back by signing an “informative” letter to Iran, saying that a nuclear deal would not last because the next president could reverse it. Secretary John Kerry, one of the lead negotiators in the talks, called the letter “utterly disgusting” and “irresponsible.” Two dozen editorial boards slammed the letter and over 200,000 people signed a petition asking the senators to be charged for violating the Logan Act, a law which forbids unauthorized citizens from negotiating with foreign governments.

2. Senator Cotton said the only problem he has with Guantanamo Bay prison is that “there are too many empty beds.” Ignoring waterboarding, indefinite detention, forced feeding and other torturous acts, Tom Cotton insists that the US should be “proud” of how it treats the “savages” detained in Gitmo. As far as Cotton is concerned, “[the prisoners] can rot in hell. But as long as they don’t do that, then they can rot in Guantanamo Bay.” This is counter to the position of many other Senators and President Obama, who has promised time and time again to close the prison. There are still dozens of men held at Gitmo who have been cleared for release, but that doesn’t seem to bother Senator They-Can-Rot-in-Hell.

3. He has compared the negotiations of the UN Security Council (P5+1) with Iran to the “appeasement of Nazi Germany.”This accusation is ridiculous. Rouhani’s Iran is not Hitler’s Germany. Despite Cotton’s claims that “there are nothing but hardliners in Tehran,” Rouhani is a reformist, someone we need to work with to defeat ISIL. And the ongoing nuclear negotiations with Iran are a far better ––and safer–– approach than pushing Iran to the brink of war with the US (and Israel). For once, there is actually hope for a peaceful solution, something that certainly was not an option with Nazi Germany.

4. He thinks the use of killer drones should be expanded. Killer drones have resulted in thousands of civilian deaths in countries we’re not even at war with, like Pakistan and Yemen, and have led to an expansion of extremist groups. Senator Cotton makes the argument of many other pro-droners: that drone pilots are safer than air pilots, and casualties are reduced. Unfortunately, it’s not that simple. Drone pilots still suffer the psychological trauma associated with attacks, and the “collateral damage” of drone strikes means that families and children lose their lives along with the targeted terrorists. (Note: only 2% of all people killed by drone strikes have been confirmed “high-value” targets.) The last thing we need is the expansion of drone warfare, Tom.

5. He claims that “bombing makes us safer.” While in some masochistic, twisted logic that might make sense in the short term, historically speaking US military intervention has led to more extremism–– as with the formation of ISIS after the invasion of Iraq ––and turned local populations against the United States. Ultimately, bombing other countries just fosters more hate and anti-American sentiment. Bombing might not make us safer, but it certainly makes Tom Cotton’s friends in the defense industry a whole lot richer. Just 24 hours after his notorious letter to Iran became public, Cotton was the guest of honor at an event hosted by the National Defense Industrial Association, a lobbying and professional group for defense contractors.

6. He uses fear-mongering to call for a crackdown on immigrants and a clampdown on the Mexican border. Senator Cotton says drug cartels in Mexico are ready to expand into human trafficking and even terrorism, and could infiltrate our southern border and “attack it right here in places like Arkansas.” He’s made the wild accusation that Hezbollah is collaborating with locals in Mexico to “cross our borders and attack us here.” Ignoring the fences, drones, cameras and patrols that constantly survey the border, he maintains that the border is wide open. “As long as our border is open and it’s defenseless, then it’s not just an immigration issue, it’s a national security issue.” Be afraid, says Cotton, very afraid–so I can keep feeding the national security state!

7. He received $700,000 for his senate campaign from the Emergency Committee for Israel.That’s correct — $700,000! Such an exorbitant amount of money ensures that Cotton is one of the most pro-Israel senators in Congress. During the 2014 Israeli invasion of Gaza, when over 500 Palestinian were killed, Cotton called the Israeli defense force “the most moral, humanitarian fighting force in the world.” In December he said Congressshould consider supplying Israel with B-52s and so-called “bunker-buster” bombs for a possible strike against Iran.

8. As an Army Lieutenant in 2006, Cotton called for the prosecution of two New York Times journalists for espionage.From his early days, Cotton has not been a fan of expository journalism. When the New York Times published an article about how the government was tracking terrorist financing, Cotton called for the journalists to be imprisoned. This news story got a lot of heat from various conservative outlets, but before he was even running for office, Cotton took it upon himself to publicize his grievances in a sarcastic letter to journalists Eric Lichtblau and James Risen. It seems that Cotton’s letter to Iran a few days ago was not the first of its kind.

9. He thinks food-stamp recipients are “addicts.”Senator Cotton hates food stamps. In his own words, he thinks the system is “riddled with fraud and abuse” and “has resulted in long-term dependency.” This is coming from the senator of Arkansas, which ranked number one in the number of residents who suffer from food insecurity. If Cotton had his way, there would be much harsher restrictions on food stamps, and the overall budget for welfare would be cut severely. Considering the high level of poverty in Arkansas, Cotton is actually voting against the interests of the people he is supposed to represent. If he’s concerned that the system is “riddled with fraud and abuse,” an audit of the Pentagon should be at the top of his to-do list.

10.  He has opposed legislation to expand women’s rights.Senator Cotton voted against equal pay legislation and the Violence Against Women Act. While Senator Cotton’s website will say that the vote was taken out of context, and that the Senator supports harsh punishment for sexual assault, a vote is a vote. If that’s the case, then why would he vote against an act that would give women more resources in the case of abuse or assault? And why would he vote against legislation that would push for equivalent pay? No matter what defense Cotton’s team comes up with, there’s really no logic or excuse to vote against women’s rights.

****

Rep. Alan Grayson says Sen. Cotton is “already on his way to marking himself as the premiere warmonger of the 114th Congress.” Heather Digby Parton from Salon called him“Ted Cruz with a war record, Sarah Palin with a Harvard degree, Chris Christie with a Southern accent.” Whatever your characterization, this much is clear: this freshman senator is an arrogant bully and needs a time out.

Medea Benjamin is cofounder of the peace group CodePink. Her latest book is Kingdom of the Unjust: Behind the U.S.-Saudi Connection (OR Books, September 2016).

Nalini Ramachandran is a student at Northeastern University studying International Affairs and Middle East Studies. She’s currently working in the CODEPINK Washington, DC office.

Mike Flynn Wasn’t Robert Mueller’s ‘Big Fish.’ Why The Trump Team Should Be Worried.

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Obama issues a warning in India: ‘Think before you tweet’ – Washington Post

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Obama issues a warning in India: ‘Think before you tweet’
Washington Post
Former president Barack Obama made a few pointed jibes without actually naming President Trump in remarks in New Delhi on Friday, taking on social media, climate-change deniers and religious intolerance. In a discussion period at a leadership 
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Hey, birds: do you think before you tweet? – Google Search

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Hey, birds: do you think before you tweet? – Google Search

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Obama on social media: You’ve got to ‘think before you tweet’ | TheHill

thehill.com/…/362729-obama-on-social-media-youve-got-to-think-before-you-tweet

11 hours ago – Former President Obama offered advice on how to use social media on Friday, saying users should think before they post on platforms like Twitter. “Michelle was giving the general idea … that don’t say the first thing that pops in your head. Have a little bit of an edit function … think before youspeak, think …

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Obama’s sage advice: Think before you tweet | New York Post

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9 hours ago – “Have a little bit of an edit function, think before you speak, think before you tweet,” Obama said at the Hindustan Times Leadership Summit in New Delhi, … “I can have a debate with someone about climate change and about what we need to do, but if you call climate change a hoax, I don’t know what to do …

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Flynn enters guilty plea, will cooperate with Mueller – The Hill

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Flynn enters guilty plea, will cooperate with Mueller
The Hill
President Trump’s short-lived first national security adviser, Michael Flynn, on Friday morning pleaded guilty to lying to FBI agents in one of the most dramatic developments yet in special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian 
Michael Flynn’s guilty plea: A comprehensive timelineWashington Post
Michael Flynn, ex-Trump aide, pleads guilty to lying to FBI, pledges to cooperateUSA TODAY
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Work orders from the White House include requests to take care of mice, ants and cockroaches. (iStock). There’s a mouse in the White House. Maintenance workers were requested to take care of mice in the Situation Room and the White House Navy mess food 
White House logs show problem with ants, mice and cockroachesBBC News
White House Work Orders Reveal Mice, Roaches, RedecoratingNBC4 Washington
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11:52 AM 12/1/2017 – The Operation Silk Road – The World News and Times

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11:52 AM 12/1/2017 – The Operation Silk Road – The World News and Times
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11:52 AM 12/1/2017 – The Operation Silk Road – The World News and Times
The Operation “Silk Road”: Please, meet (for now) the CIA Director, and our Designated Future President…

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The Operation “Silk Road”: Please, meet (for now) the CIA Director, and our Designated Future President, Mr. Silk (codename Cotton). Yea-yeah, the same one who six years ago was just a kid looking for a job…

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Michael Flynn’s Russia Timeline – FactCheck.org
Flynn guilty plea boosts impeachment talk but it’s premature. We need facts on Russia. – USA TODAY
A Timeline Of Michael Flynn’s Questionable Interactions With Russia
Breaking down Flynn’s lies about his Russia calls – CNN
Is Tom Cotton the Future of Trumpism?
10 Horrifying Facts About GOP Senator Tom Cotton
Mike Flynn Wasn’t Robert Mueller’s ‘Big Fish.’ Why The Trump Team Should Be Worried.
Obama issues a warning in India: ‘Think before you tweet’ – Washington Post
Hey, birds: do you think before you tweet? – Google Search
Hey, birds: do you think before you tweet? – Google Search
Flynn enters guilty plea, will cooperate with Mueller – The Hill
White House work orders show infiltration of mice, roaches – Fox News
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11:52 AM 12/1/2017 – The Operation Silk Road – The World News and Times
11:52 AM 12/1/2017 – The Operation Silk Road – The World News and Times
The Operation “Silk Road”: Please, meet (for now) the CIA Director, and our Designated Future President…
8:10 AM 12/1/2017 – Sen. Cotton or Dir. Silk, you still gotta serve somebody – Trump Investigations …
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1:45 PM 11/30/2017 – Trump Wants to Install a Reliable Mouthpiece on Russia at the CIA – Mother Jones…
12:05 PM 11/30/2017 – Donald Trump Attacks China For Having ‘No Impact On Little Rocket Man’
10:49 AM 11/30/2017 – Pompeo has also chafed at the restrictions inherent in running the C.I.A., where…

 

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Michael Flynn’s Russia Timeline – FactCheck.org
 

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Retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, President Trump’s former national security adviser, pleaded guilty to making false statements to the FBI, the U.S. Special Counsel’s Office announced on Dec. 1.

In his plea agreement, Flynn admitted he lied to FBI agents about two discussions he had with Sergey Kislyak, the Russian ambassador to the United States, in December 2016 when Flynn was still a private citizen and before Trump took office.

In the first instance, Flynn — who was interviewed by FBI agents on Jan. 24 — admitted he lied to FBI agents about a conversation he had with Kislyak on Dec. 22, 2016, about an upcoming U.N. Security Council resolution. Although he initially denied it to FBI agents, Flynn now admits that he asked Russia to delay or defeat a U.N. Security Council resolution, approved Dec. 23, 2016, that would have condemned Israel’s building of settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem. The Obama administration had agreed to allow the resolution to come up for a vote over the objection of Israel.

The incoming Trump administration opposed the U.N. resolution, and Flynn was directed by a “very senior member of the Presidential Transition Team” to contact foreign governments, including Russia … to influence those governments to delay the vote or defeat the resolution,” according to the plea agreement. The “very senior member” of the transition team was not identified.

A day later, the U.N. resolution would pass, with Russia voting in favor and the U.S. abstaining from voting.

Flynn also admitted that he lied to investigators about a Dec. 29 conversation that he had with Kislyak. On the day of the conversation, the Obama administration announced sanctions against Russia in response to Russia’s meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Flynn called to discuss the new sanctions with “a senior official” of the Trump transition team “who was with other senior members of the Presidential Transition Team at the Mar-a-Lago resort” that Trump owns in Florida.

Immediately after the call to Mar-a-Lago, Flynn called Kislyak and “requested that Russia not escalate the situation and only respond to the U.S. Sanctions in a reciprocal manner,” the plea agreement said. Kislyak agreed that Russia would “moderate its response to those sanctions” as a result of his request, according to the U.S. special prosecutor’s office.

But, when interviewed by the FBI on Jan. 24, Flynn denied making such a request and could not recall if Kislyak agreed to his request.

The former White House aide also acknowledged that he made “false statements and omissions” on documents filed with the Justice Department regarding payments that his company, the Flynn Intel Group Inc., received for lobbying work that principally benefited the government of Turkey, according to the plea agreement. Flynn retroactively filed foreign lobbying reports on March 7 for work that he did during the presidential campaign in 2016.

Flynn is now cooperating with the special prosecutor’s investigation into Russia’s efforts to influence the 2016 presidential campaign and whether there was any coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Below are some key events in the Russia investigation involving Flynn from our larger story, “Timeline of Russia Investigation.”

2015

Dec. 10 — Retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn speaks at RT’s anniversary conference in Moscow. RT is a Russian government-funded TV station once known as Russia Today. Flynn, who would become a foreign policy adviser to Trump during the campaign and national security adviser in the Trump administration, sits next to Russian President Vladimir Putin at the event.

In remarks at the event, Flynn is critical of the Obama administration’s foreign policy and supportive of working with Russia to battle ISIS. (It is later learned that he was paid $45,000 for his appearance, and failed to report the income on his government financial disclosure forms.)

2016

Feb. 26 — Reuters reports that Flynn “has been informally advising Trump” on foreign policy during the presidential campaign.

Aug. 17 — Trump receives his first intelligence briefing at FBI headquarters in New York City. He is joined by Flynn and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie.

Nov. 8 — Trump is elected 45th president of the United States.

Nov. 10 — Trump meets with President Barack Obama at the White House. Obama reportedly warns Trump against hiring Flynn.

Nov. 18 — The president-elect selects Flynn as his national security adviser.

Dec. 1 — Flynn and Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and adviser, meet with Kislyak, the Russian ambassador, at Trump Tower. (The White House did not acknowledge the meeting occurred until it was disclosed in March 2017. In a statement to congressional investigators on July 24, 2017, Kushner described the contents of the meeting. He said Kislyak “wanted to convey information from what he called his ‘generals’” about “U.S. policy in Syria.” Kushner said the exchange of information did not occur at that time because neither party could arrange a secure line of communication. “I asked if they had an existing communications channel at his embassy we could use where they would be comfortable transmitting the information they wanted to relay to General Flynn. The Ambassador said that would not be possible and so we all agreed that we would receive this information after the Inauguration,” Kushner’s statement reads.)

Dec. 22 — Flynn calls Kislyak and asks if Russia would delay or defeat an upcoming U.N. Security Council resolution vote that sought to condemn Israel’s building of settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem. The Obama administration agreed to allow the resolution to come up for a vote — angering Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. (A day later, the U.N. resolution would pass, with Russia voting in favor and the U.S. abstaining from voting.)

Dec. 29 — With less than a month remaining in office, Obama announces “a number of actions in response to the Russian government’s aggressive harassment of U.S. officials and cyber operations aimed at the U.S. election in 2016.”

In a phone call with Kislyak, Flynn asks that Russia refrain from retaliating to the U.S. sanctions. Kislyak agrees that Russia would “moderate its response to those sanctions” as a result of his request, according to charges later filed against Flynn by the U.S. special prosecutor’s office. (Flynn’s conversation with the Russian ambassador would not become public until next year.)

Dec. 30 — Russian President Putin issues a statement saying that Russia would not retaliate for the U.S. sanctions. Putin says he hoped to improve relations with the United States “based on the policies of the Trump Administration.”

Trump tweets, “Great move on delay (by V. Putin) – I always knew he was very smart!”

2017

Jan. 12 — The Washington Post reports that Flynn and Kislyak spoke on Dec. 29, the day that the U.S. announced new sanctions on Russia in response to the cyberattacks during the 2016 presidential election. Incoming White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer denies that the call was about U.S. sanctions. “The call centered on the logistics of setting up a call with the president of Russia and the president-elect after he was sworn in,” Spicer said. “And they exchanged logistical information on how to initiate and schedule that call. That was it, plain and simple.”

Jan. 15 — Vice President-elect Mike Pence says Flynn and Kislyak did not discuss U.S. sanctions on Russia. “They did not discuss anything having to do with the United States’ decision to expel diplomats or impose censure against Russia,” Pence says.

Jan. 20 — Trump is inaugurated as the 45th president of the United States.

Jan. 22 — On the same day that Flynn is sworn in as the national security adviser, the Wall Street Journal reports that U.S. counterintelligence agents have investigated Flynn’s communications with Russian officials.

Jan. 24 — Two days after he takes office as national security adviser, Flynn is interviewed by FBI agents. He is asked about two conversations that he had with Kislyak, the Russian ambassador to the United States, in December 2016 when Flynn was still a private citizen and before Trump took office.

Flynn tells the FBI agents that he did not ask Kislyak, in a Dec. 29, 2016, conversation, for Russia to refrain from retaliating after the Obama administration announced sanctions that day against Russia for interfering in the 2016 elections. He also says that he did not ask Kislyak, in a Dec. 22, 2016, conversation for Russia to delay or defeat a U.N. Security Council resolution, approved Dec. 23, 2016, that would have condemned Israel’s building of settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem. Flynn would later plead guilty to lying to the FBI about both of those conversations with Kislyak.

Jan. 25 — The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence announces that it will investigate Russia’s efforts to influence the 2016 presidential election and “any intelligence regarding links between Russia and individuals associated with political campaigns.”

Jan. 26 — Acting Attorney General Sally Yates meets with White House counsel Donald McGahn in his office. She tells McGahn that high-ranking administration officials, including Vice President Pence, had made statements “about General Flynn’s conduct that we knew to be untrue.” She was referring to administration statements that Flynn did not discuss U.S. sanctions against Russia with the Russian ambassador. (Her meeting with McGahn would not be disclosed until Yates testified before Congress on May 8.)

Jan. 28 — Trump receives a congratulatory phone call from Putin.

Feb. 9 — The Washington Post reports that Flynn “privately discussed U.S. sanctions against Russia with that country’s ambassador to the United States during the month before President Trump took office, contrary to public assertions by Trump officials,” citing unnamed current and former officials.

Feb. 13 – Flynn resigns. He acknowledges that he misled Pence and others in the administration about his conversations with Kislyak, the Russian ambassador. “I inadvertently briefed the Vice President Elect and others with incomplete information regarding my phone calls with the Russian Ambassador,” Flynn says.

Feb. 14 — Trump privately meets with FBI Director James Comey in the Oval Office. Comey says that the president brought up the FBI investigation of Flynn. “He then said, ‘I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go. He is a good guy. I hope you can let this go.’ I replied only that ‘he is a good guy.’ … I did not say I would ‘let this go,’” Comey would later recall. (Comey gave this account of his meeting with Trump in written testimony for his June 8 hearing before the Senate intelligence committee. The account was first reported May 16 by the New York Times. The White House issued a statement at that time saying the Times story is “not a truthful or accurate portrayal of the conversation between the president and Mr. Comey.”)

Feb. 15 — A day after Trump reportedly asked Comey to drop the investigation of Flynn, the FBI director tells U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions that “he did not want to be left alone again with the president,” according to a New York Times story published June 6. (Comey also confirms the Times account in his June 8 Senate testimony.)

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus asks FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe if the agency would help the White House knock down news stories about contacts between Trump aides and Russians during the 2016 presidential campaign.

Feb. 16 — Trump is asked at a press conference, “Did you direct Mike Flynn to discuss the sanctions with the Russian ambassador?” He responds, “No, I didn’t. No, I didn’t.”

March 7 — Flynn retroactively registers as a foreign lobbyist for work that he and his company, the Flynn Intel Group, did for a Turkish company during the presidential campaign that primarily benefited the Republic of Turkey. Flynn reports his consulting firm being paid $530,000. According to USA Today‘s report of Flynn’s lobbying work, “the Flynn Intel Group hired researchers to examine Fethullah Gulen, a reclusive Islamic cleric who lives in exile in rural Pennsylvania. [Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip] Erdogan has blamed Gulen’s opposition group for an attempted 2016 coup and has sought his extradition. On Election Day, The Hill newspaper published a Flynn op-ed that called Gulen ‘radical cleric’ and said the U.S. government should ‘not provide him a safe haven.’”

March 30 — Flynn’s attorney, Robert Kelner, says in a statement that his client is willing to testify before Congress if Flynn receives immunity. “General Flynn certainly has a story to tell, and he very much wants to tell it, should the circumstances permit,” Kelner’s statement says.

March 31 — Trump tweets: “Mike Flynn should ask for immunity in that this is a witch hunt (excuse for big election loss), by media & Dems, of historic proportion!”

The White House releases a revised financial disclosure form for Flynn that shows he received speaking fees from RT TV, the Russian television network, and two other Russian firms. Flynn failed to report that income when he initially filed his disclosure form in February.

April 28 – The Senate intelligence committee requests that Flynn turn over any documents relevant to its investigation into the Russian interference with the election. (Flynn declined, and the committee would later subpoena the documents, which Flynn turned over on June 6.)

May 8 — Yates testifies at a Senate hearing that she had two in-person meetings and one phone call with McGahn, the White House counsel, to discuss Flynn’s meetings with Kislyak, the Russian ambassador. Her first meeting with McGahn was on Jan. 26, as mentioned above.

May 9 – Trump fires Comey. A White House statement said that Trump acted “based on the clear recommendations” of Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. In a two-and-a-half-page memo, Rosenstein cited Comey’s handling of the FBI’s investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server for official government business while she was the secretary of state under Obama. Rosenstein criticized Comey for holding a press conference on July 5, 2016, to publicly announce his recommendation to not charge Clinton, and for disclosing on Oct. 28, 2016, that the FBI had reopened its investigation of Clinton.

May 10 — The Senate intelligence committee subpoenas Flynn seeking “documents relevant to the Committee’s investigation into Russian interference with the 2016 election.”

May 11 – Trump says in an interview with NBC’s Lester Holt that he was thinking of “this Russia thing” when he decided to fire Comey. The president says he would have fired Comey with or without Rosenstein’s recommendation. “He made a recommendation, but regardless of recommendation I was going to fire Comey, knowing there was no good time to do it. And, in fact, when I decided to just do it, I said to myself, I said, ‘You know, this Russia thing with Trump and Russia is a made-up story. It’s an excuse by the Democrats for having lost an election that they should have won.’”

May 16 — The New York Times reports that Trump asked Comey at a Feb. 14 dinner meeting to shut down the FBI investigation of Flynn. (See the Feb. 14 entry.)

May 17 — Rosenstein, the deputy attorney general, appoints former FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III as special counsel to investigate any possible collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government’s efforts to influence the 2016 presidential election. Rosenstein makes the appointment instead of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who had recused himself from any federal investigations involving the 2016 election.

May 18 — At a press conference with the president of Colombia, Trump denies that he asked Comey to close down the FBI’s investigation of Flynn. “No. No. Next question,” Trump said.

May 31 — The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence issues subpoenas for testimony, documents and business records from Flynn and Michael Cohen, a personal attorney to the president.

June 6 — Flynn provides more than 600 pages of documents to the Senate intelligence committee, CNN reports. The committee subpoenaed the documents on May 10.

The Washington Post reports that Trump asked Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats in a March 22 meeting “if he could intervene with then-FBI Director James B. Comey to get the bureau to back off its focus on former national security adviser Michael Flynn in its Russia probe.” The report was based on “officials who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive internal matters.” Brian Hale, a spokesman for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, issues a statement that said Coats “never felt pressured by the President or anyone else in the Administration to influence any intelligence matters or ongoing investigations.”

June 8 – Comey testifies under oath before the Senate intelligence committee. As his written testimony detailed, Comey says the president asked him for his loyalty at a Jan. 27 dinner and asked him to drop the Flynn investigation at a Feb. 14 meeting. He also says Trump asked that the FBI “lift the cloud” over his administration and publicly announce that the president is personally not under investigation on March 30 and April 11.

Comey also discloses that he gave a copy of his memo about his meeting with the president on Feb. 14 to a friend with instructions that he share the contents of the memo with a reporter. He says he did so “because I thought that might prompt the appointment of a special counsel.”

Asked if the president’s request to drop the Flynn investigation amounts to obstruction of justice, Comey says: “I don’t know. That — that’s [special counsel] Bob Mueller’s job to sort that out.”

June 9 – At a joint press conference with Romanian President Klaus Iohannis, Trump denies that he told Comey to drop the Flynn investigation. “I didn’t say that,” Trump says. He also says that he never asked Comey to pledge loyalty to him. “I hardly know the man,” Trump says. “I’m not going to say I want you to pledge allegiance.”

June 15 — The Washington Post reports that the FBI and federal prosecutors have been “examining the financial dealings” of Kushner, Flynn, former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and former foreign policy adviser Carter Page.

Dec. 1 — Flynn pleads guilty to making false statements to the FBI and agrees to cooperate with the FBI investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election. “My guilty plea and agreement to cooperate with the Special Counsel’s Office reflect a decision I made in the best interests of my family and of our country,” Flynn says in a statement.

Flynn guilty plea boosts impeachment talk but it’s premature. We need facts on Russia. – USA TODAY
 

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USA TODAY
Flynn guilty plea boosts impeachment talk but it’s premature. We need facts on Russia.
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Talk of impeaching President Trump surged after Michael Flynn, his former national security adviser and transition aide, pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. But what is the real meaning of the Constitution’s mysterious provision authorizing removal ofand more »

A Timeline Of Michael Flynn’s Questionable Interactions With Russia
 

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Michael Flynn has been charged with making false statements to the FBI. Here’s how he got to this point.

Breaking down Flynn’s lies about his Russia calls – CNN
 

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Breaking down Flynn’s lies about his Russia calls
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The sanctions targeted Russia’s intelligence services and Russian agencies that were involved in cyberactivities. Flynn and Kislyak had phone conversations on December 29, 2016, the day that Obama announced the new sanctions and also expelled 35 
Here’s what Mike Flynn lied to the FBI aboutVICE News
Mike Flynn, Trump and Mar-a-Lago: A timeline on path to guilty pleaPalm Beach Post
Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Lying to FBI About Russia, Appears to Be Cooperating With MuellerSlate Magazine (blog)
theday.com –Daily Beast
all 2,307 news articles »
Is Tom Cotton the Future of Trumpism?
 

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If you believed the national media, the week of the annual Republican Party fund-raising dinner, in Fort Smith, Arkansas, in late August, was one of the worst of Donald Trump’s Presidency. The President had just responded to the unrest in Charlottesville with statements that appeared sympathetic to neo-Nazi demonstrators, and even some members of his own party were denouncing him. The White House staff was in turmoil, following the departure of Reince Priebus as chief of staff, and the Senate had failed to pass a replacement for the Affordable Care Act. The featured speaker for the evening was the state’s junior senator, Tom Cotton, who seized the chance to address the disquiet in the nation’s capital.

At forty years old, Cotton is the youngest member of the Senate, and he retains the erect posture and solemn bearing that he displayed as a member of the Army’s Old Guard, which presides at military ceremonies, including funerals, in Washington. He’s let his hair grow, a little, since his Army days. When he first ran for office, in 2012—he served a single term in the House of Representatives before winning his Senate seat, in 2014—Cotton was often described as robotic on the stump, but he’s improved somewhat as a speaker, even if he still projects more intelligence than warmth. In this manner, he gave an assignment to the two hundred or so guests in the hotel ballroom.

“Go home tonight and turn on one of the nighttime comedy shows. Tomorrow morning, turn on one of the cable morning-news shows. This Saturday, watch ‘Saturday Night Live,’ ” he said. “All the high wardens of popular culture in this country, they love to make fun of Donald Trump, to mock him, to ridicule him. They make fun of his hair, they make fun of the color of his skin, they make fun of the way he talks—he’s from Queens, not from Manhattan. They make fun of that long tie he wears, they make fun of his taste for McDonald’s.” He went on, “What I don’t think they realize is that out here in Arkansas and the heartland and the places that made a difference in that election, like Michigan and Wisconsin, when we hear that kind of ridicule, we hear them making fun of the way we look, and the way we talk, and the way we think.”

It was, on one level, a breathtaking leap—to equate mockery of a louche New York billionaire with attacks on the citizens of this small, conservative city, which lies across the Arkansas River from Oklahoma. But Cotton’s appeal to his audience for solidarity with Trump, which was greeted with strong applause, represented just one part of his enthusiastic embrace of the President. Stephen Bannon, Trump’s former top strategist and the chairman of the right-wing Web site Breitbart News, told me, “Next to Trump, he’s the elected official who gets it the most—the economic nationalism. Cotton was the one most supportive of us, up front and behind the scenes, from the beginning. He understands that the Washington élite—this permanent political class of both parties, between the K Street consultants and politicians—needs to be shattered.” At the same time, Cotton has maintained strong ties with the establishment wing of the G.O.P. Karl Rove, President George W. Bush’s chief political adviser, told me, “Cotton is not like a Steve Bannon, who wants to blow up the existing structure, uproot the ideology of the Republican Party and replace it with something new. He’s a rising star. He’s capable of building bridges within the Party. He wants to get things done.”

In recent weeks, several Republican Senators have denounced Trump for his intemperance and his dishonesty. Jeff Flake, of Arizona, and Bob Corker, of Tennessee, condemned Trump and announced that they would not seek reëlection in 2018. Ben Sasse, of Nebraska, whose term is not up until 2020, said that, by threatening journalists, Trump was violating his oath to defend the Constitution. Cotton has made a different bet, offering only the gentlest of criticisms of the President. When, in the course of several weeks of conversations, I asked Cotton about one or another of Trump’s controversial statements or tweets, he always responded in the same manner. “The President puts things sometimes in a way that I would not,” he said in early October. “But he was still nominated by our voters and elected by the American people to be our President, and if we want him to accomplish our agenda we need to set him up for success.”

Even Trump’s latest political traumas have not shaken Cotton’s faith in him. Following the indictment of Trump’s former campaign manager Paul Manafort and former campaign adviser Rick Gates, last week, Cotton urged a prompt resolution of the investigation into the Trump campaign, but he did not call for the removal of Robert Mueller, the special counsel. “What’s in the best interest of everyone is for these inquiries to move forward, and to follow them to their proper conclusion as quickly as possible,” Cotton said.

Roby Brock, who hosts the leading public-affairs television program in Arkansas, told me, “From the beginning, Tom could play to both the establishment and the Tea Party. Everyone recognizes he’s got a firm set of conservative principles, but that makes him a polarizing figure. There are a lot of people here, too, who hate him and think he’s the Antichrist. The only thing everyone agrees on is that he wants to be President someday.” To make that next leap, Cotton expresses the militarism, bellicosity, intolerance, and xenophobia of Donald Trump, but without the childish tweets. For those who see Trump’s Presidency as an aberration, or as a singular phenomenon, Cotton offers a useful corrective. He and his supporters see Trump and Trumpism as the future of the Republican Party.

In the early days of the Trump Administration, Cotton exercised influence from behind the scenes. Bannon told me, “He spent a lot of time in my little war room, and he gave us a lot of good advice. He was the one who told us about John Kelly,” the former Marine Corps general who is now Trump’s chief of staff. (The Senator and Kelly had met at a security conference when Cotton was in the House.) In recent months, however, Cotton’s influence has become more apparent, as Trump has embraced some of his most high-profile positions.

In September, President Trump repealed the Obama-era executive order known as DACA, which protected the so-called Dreamers from deportation, but he said that he also wanted Congress to pass a law that would allow them to remain in the United States, even making a preliminary deal with Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi, the Democratic congressional leaders. But, after Cotton spoke out against a quick deal to protect the Dreamers, Trump made a formal proposal to Congress that attached many strings Cotton had demanded. “I had dinner with the President and General Kelly on October 2nd, and we talked about DACA,” Cotton told me. “They said that Chuck and Nancy had done some post-dinner spin, to go along with the post-dinner dessert, about what the President actually agreed to on DACA. I think the fix that the President announced is a better step in the right direction.”

The following month, Trump gave Cotton a victory on the touchstone issue of his Senate career by decertifying Iran’s compliance with the nuclear-arms deal that the Obama Administration had negotiated. “I told the President in July that he shouldn’t certify that Iran was complying with the agreement,” Cotton told me. “Putting aside the issue of technical compliance or noncompliance, it’s clear that the agreement is not in our national interest.” Following Trump’s action, Cotton joined forces with Senator Corker, the chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, on a proposal that, if passed, would likely lead to the termination of the Iran nuclear deal and the reimposition of American sanctions.

“Let there be no doubt about this point,” Cotton said, in a recent speech to the Council on Foreign Relations. “If we are forced to take action, the United States has the ability to totally destroy Iran’s nuclear infrastructure. And, if they choose to rebuild it, we could destroy it again, until they get the picture. Nor should we hesitate if compelled to take military action.” In describing his preferred approach to negotiations with Iran, Cotton said, “One thing I learned in the Army is that when your opponent is on his knees you drive him to the ground and choke him out.” In response, a questioner pointed out that killing a prisoner of war is not “American practice.” (It is, in fact, a war crime.)

Similarly, in North Korea, Cotton supports Trump’s brinkmanship with Kim Jong Un, and excoriates China for its failure to rein in its ally. “Time and time again, Beijing shows that it is not up to being the great power it aspires to be,” Cotton said. (His hostility toward China endears him to the Bannon wing of the Republican Party, which views the U.S.-China relationship as the defining conflict of the modern world.)

Cotton has emerged as such a close ally of the Trump White House that one recent report suggested that the President would name him director of the C.I.A. if Mike Pompeo, the current director, were to replace Rex Tillerson as Secretary of State. (Trump is widely believed to be dissatisfied with Tillerson.) In a conversation in mid-October, Cotton did not dismiss the possibility of taking the C.I.A. job. “I am pleased to be a senator,” he told me. “But, of course, I will always take a call from the President, and he has called me many times.” As a member of Trump’s Administration, Cotton would ratify the President’s instincts. He offers Trump a certainty that matches his own, especially about the threats the nation faces and the best ways to address them.

In August, I visited Cotton in the house where he grew up, in Yell County, Arkansas. When I arrived, Cotton’s father was also walking in the door. Len Cotton did not offer to shake hands right away, because he had just welcomed two newborn calves to the family farm, and he thought it prudent to wash up first.

The Cottons have been in Arkansas for six generations, and Tom’s parents make their living running what’s known as a cow-calf operation, on several plots of land in the Arkansas River Valley. In the specialized world of beef-and-dairy production, the Cottons’ business is the first stage—the production of the cows, which are sold to ranchers. The Cottons have always done some farming, but when Tom was a boy his mother was a public-school teacher and a middle-school principal, and his father worked for state government, doing inspections for the Department of Health. Like most people in Arkansas at the time, Tom’s parents were Democrats. But the leitmotif of Tom Cotton’s political career has been the decline of the Democratic Party among white voters in Arkansas. “The Democratic Party has drifted away from them,” Tom told me, as his parents sat nearby. “Bill Clinton would be repudiated by his own party today. Hillary Clinton repudiated a lot of her husband’s chief accomplishments when he was in office. So that’s a real fundamental story about politics in Arkansas and politics across the heartland.”

Tom had an idyllic boyhood in the town of Dardanelle, centered on sports and school, where he excelled, and he won admission to Harvard. When he arrived in Cambridge, in the fall of 1995, he still had braces on his teeth, though he had grown to a full six feet five; friends remember him as a bit of a loner, at least at first. He was also already a conservative, if not a Republican, as he was not afraid to let his new neighbors know.

Cotton began writing an opinion column for the Crimson, the campus daily, where he made a name for himself as an outspoken dissenter on a liberal campus. Shortly before he graduated, in 1998, Thomas B. Cotton wrote a farewell to his readers. “I never sought to be loved or to be treated justly,” he said. “How could I? I wrote against sacred cows, such as the cult of diversity, affirmative action, conspicuous compassion and radical participatory democracy. I wrote in favor of taboo notions, such as Promise Keepers, student apathy, honor and (most unforgivably) conservativism.” After college, Cotton went to Harvard Law School. He worked in law firms during the summers and landed a clerkship with a federal appeals-court judge.

He appeared headed for a life of prosperous anonymity in law, but the attacks of September 11, 2001, upended his plans. “I was going to play intramural basketball, enjoy my last year in school, and then, in the second week of school, the attacks happened, and that changed my orientation,” he told me. “I spent a lot more time from that point forward thinking about the threat we faced, reading about history, reading military history, started thinking about joining the Army.”

Cotton approached the matter with the careful deliberation that has characterized his career. He decided to take the clerkship he had already accepted, with Judge Jerry Smith, on the Fifth Circuit, then work at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, in Washington, to start paying off his student loans. “I thought he had a great future at the firm,” Bill Kilberg, the partner who supervised Cotton’s work, told me. “Then, one day in 2004, Tom came and said he was thinking about leaving the firm to join the Army. I said, ‘Tom, the Army has plenty of lawyers, they really don’t need you, and it’s not necessary for you to join the Army to serve.’ He said, ‘Oh, no, I’m not going to be a lawyer. I’m going to be an Airborne Ranger.’ And I looked at him and said, ‘Tom, have you talked to your mother about this?’ ”

When I asked Cotton about the decision, he said, “The Army needs lawyers, but that’s not the heart of the Army’s mission. The Army’s mission is the infantry’s mission.” He went on, “So I wanted to do that mission, wanted to do the heart of it. I wanted to lead troops in combat.”

Cotton served with the 101st Airborne Division in Iraq. He led ninety-six-hour patrols in the field, followed by thirty-six-hour stretches at a base near Baghdad. The base had Internet access, and one day in the summer of 2006 Cotton saw that the Times had disclosed, over objections from the Bush Administration, the existence of certain terrorist-surveillance programs. Cotton fired off a letter to the editor, copying several conservative Web sites, and then left on a patrol, where he was cut off from all electronic contact with the United States. “Congratulations on disclosing our government’s highly classified anti-terrorist-financing program,” the letter begins. “I apologize for not writing sooner. But I am a lieutenant in the United States Army and I spent the last four days patrolling one of the more dangerous areas in Iraq.”

The letter combined outrage, overstatement, and savvy politics in a manner that Trump would perfect a decade later. “You may think you have done a public service, but you have gravely endangered the lives of my soldiers and all other soldiers and innocent Iraqis here,” Cotton wrote. “Next time I hear that familiar explosion—or next time I feel it—I will wonder whether we could have stopped that bomb had you not instructed terrorists how to evade our financial surveillance.” He continued, “And, by the way, having graduated from Harvard Law and practiced with a federal appellate judge and two Washington law firms before becoming an infantry officer, I am well-versed in the espionage laws relevant to this story and others—laws you have plainly violated. I hope that my colleagues at the Department of Justice match the courage of my soldiers here and prosecute you and your newspaper to the fullest extent of the law. By the time we return home, maybe you will be in your rightful place: not at the Pulitzer announcements, but behind bars.” When Cotton returned to the base, he learned that the Times hadn’t run the letter but the Web sites had, and the chief of staff of the Army had distributed it to his subordinates.

“I started hearing about Tom when he was still in the military, when I was state chair of our party,” Dennis Milligan, who is now the Arkansas state treasurer, told me. “As chair, you’re always looking for new talent, and people were talking about him even then. They knew he had given up all that money in the law to serve his country.” From Iraq, Cotton was summoned to serve in the Old Guard. (Cotton hoped he had won appointment to the prestigious unit on merit, but the Army had simply summoned the six tallest lieutenants in Iraq.) Later, he volunteered for a tour in Afghanistan, where he won a Bronze Star, before leaving the service, in 2009. After a brief stint working at McKinsey, Cotton returned to Arkansas to run for Congress in his home district. Mike Ross, a Democrat, had retired, and Cotton, campaigning with a heavy emphasis on his military service, won the open seat with about sixty per cent of the vote.

Arkansas, though generally regarded as a Southern state, exists at a crossroads of regions that have been slipping away from Democrats for decades. The booming north, along the Missouri border, has a Midwestern feel, especially because Walmart’s headquarters, in Bentonville, has attracted so many newcomers. The mountainous west owes much to its neighbors in Texas and Oklahoma; the plains of the east and the south, with their cotton fields and rice farms, are conspicuously Southern. “You can tell from the music,” Mark Pryor, a former Democratic senator from Arkansas, told me. “In the mountains, it’s bluegrass and folk music, but in the east and south it’s blues. Memphis is just across the Mississippi. Half of those people at Sun Records were originally from Arkansas.”

Pryor, more than anyone, has lived the recent political evolution of his state. His father, David (governor from 1975 to 1979, and senator from 1979 to 1997), along with Dale Bumpers (governor from 1971 to 1975, and senator from 1975 to 1999), and Bill Clinton (governor from 1979 to 1981 and 1983 to 1992), constitute the gifted political triumvirate that kept the Democratic Party alive in Arkansas after it had faded in nearby states. Clinton, of course, parlayed his moderate liberalism into two terms as President. Mark Pryor was elected state attorney general in 1998, and then won his Senate seat in 2002. Six years later, Republicans didn’t even field an opponent against him. But just six years after that, in 2014, Pryor lost in a landslide to the thirty-seven-year-old Tom Cotton.

“For a long time, Arkansas Democratic politics was kept separate from national Democratic politics,” John Brummett, a political columnist at the Democrat-Gazette, the leading newspaper in the state, told me. “That continued in Arkansas through the nineties and into the two-thousands, because of Clinton. White rural conservatives here could look on the national Democratic Party and see the same guy as President that they were happy enough with in Arkansas.” But the trends that were altering the politics of neighboring states were percolating in Arkansas as well. “ ‘God, guns, and gays’—social issues—were driving white conservatives to the Republicans all along,” Brummett said. “It just exploded when Obama became President.” Before the Obama years, Republicans had won the occasional race in Arkansas; Mike Huckabee was first elected governor in the nineties. But in the past decade the state’s six-person congressional delegation and seven statewide elected officials have gone from nearly all Democrats to all Republicans.

Toxic racial politics contributed to this shift. Max Brantley, a longtime local journalist, now with the Arkansas Times, said, “It is impossible not to see race as a central element in the fall of the Democratic Party here.” After the crisis over the integration of Little Rock Central High School, in 1957, racial politics in the state calmed for a time. This was in part because of the relatively small number of African-Americans; they make up roughly fifteen per cent of the population, as opposed to thirty per cent in the Deep South. “Discrimination was not as evident in Arkansas as it was in other Southern states,” Joyce Elliott, a veteran state senator, said. “It took a black President to bring out the threat.” She added, “I would always say to my liberal white friends, ‘Oh, come on, surely it’s gotten better.’ And they’d say to me, ‘Oh, no, it hasn’t. You can’t believe what white people say about Obama in private—he’s Kenyanhe’s Muslim, they’d call him unprintable racial epithets.’ ” Brantley told me, “You needed to be here to see how quickly the politics changed after Obama came in. He is so deeply disliked here. I think a lot of people in Arkansas thought he was ‘uppity,’ to use the old smear.”

Obama’s Presidency certainly coincided with, if it didn’t directly cause, the decimation of the Democratic Party in Arkansas. Republicans thrived by targeting Obama even in contests that had nothing to do with him. Republican candidates for justice of the peace inveighed against Obamacare, which they never referred to as the Affordable Care Act. When Cotton challenged Pryor, in 2014, he put Obama at the center of his campaign. In one television advertisement, featuring a grainy black-and-white video of Obama, Cotton vowed, “We need a senator who will hold the President accountable.” Another showed Obama saying that he wasn’t on the ballot but his policies were. “President Obama is finally right about something,” Cotton said, in response. A third ad ended with the tagline “Mark Pryor—voting with Obama, voting against Arkansans like you.” Cotton also benefitted from enormous outside spending by conservative groups, including some affiliated with the Koch brothers, who have substantial holdings in Arkansas. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, outside groups spent twenty-three million dollars for Cotton, compared with fourteen million for Pryor.

Cotton rejects the notion that race had anything to do with his victory, or with the rise of the Republican Party in Arkansas. “I don’t think that’s all that different from the intense unpopularity of George Bush in 2006 and 2008,” he told me, in a conversation in his Senate office. “The President’s the head of the Party, he takes up most of the attention in American politics, and when he’s very unpopular opponents in the other party tend to run against him, whether they’re running for the United States Senate or whether they’re running for justice of the peace.” Besides, he said, Democrats in Arkansas had a special reason to disdain Obama: “It wasn’t because Barack Obama was black, it was because Barack Obama stopped the Clinton restoration.”

As reviled as President Obama was in Arkansas, the Affordable Care Act has proved successful and popular in the state. About three hundred thousand people, which amounts to more than ten per cent of the state’s population, have taken advantage of the law to obtain health insurance. The state’s governor, Asa Hutchinson, is a conservative Republican, but he’s urged Congress to protect the money that the state receives under the program. He has, however, made a change. The program is not called Obamacare but, rather, Arkansas Works. It apparently took the removal of the President’s name to make the law palatable to Arkansans.

On the day after I visited Cotton’s family’s home, I told him that I had driven the scenic route back to Little Rock. “That’s because you drove along the Ouachita Mountains, which is the only range in Arkansas that goes west to east,” he said. “It provides more attractive views of the sunset than the north-south ranges.” This was an accurate, if rather bloodless, assessment of the aesthetics of the countryside, one that might be made by “Star Trek” ’s Mr. Spock, whom Cotton, with his air of icy certainty, somewhat resembles.

“I remember the first time I met Tommy,” Trey Gowdy, a South Carolina congressman, told me. “We were debating a medical-malpractice bill on the floor of the House, and he comes up and starts talking about the details of the bill. And I said, ‘First of all, who are you?’ He said he was the new congressman from Arkansas. And I said, ‘You can’t be from Arkansas, because you’re wearing shoes.’ And then he starts telling me to read some law-review article about malpractice by Robert Bork or someone. And I said, ‘Dude, the chess club meets around the corner.’ ” (Gowdy later became a close friend of Cotton and his wife, Anna, a lawyer and former prosecutor.)

Shortly after Cotton was elected to the House, the Senate passed a comprehensive immigration-reform bill, which offered a path to citizenship for some undocumented aliens. Cotton was among the leaders of the successful effort to persuade John Boehner, then the Speaker, to block the bill from even coming up for a vote in the House. When we chatted at the kitchen table of his boyhood home, Cotton explained his opposition. “It was the élite, bipartisan consensus—‘It’s the only possible solution’—another idea which the great and the good in Washington love, but wrongheaded in almost every particular,” he said. “If you live in a big city and you work in an office building, immigration is almost an unalloyed good for you. . . . It makes the price of services that you pay for a little bit more affordable—whether it’s your nanny to take care of your kids for you, or landscaping your yard, or pedicures, manicures, that sort of thing. And you get a lot of exciting new fusion restaurants as well.

“But if you live and work in a community where they have a large illegal-immigrant population that’s straining the public school, that’s clogging up the emergency room when you’re trying to get care, that makes it more dangerous to drive in the roads because people don’t have driver’s licenses or they don’t have insurance, or if they are bidding down the wages or even taking jobs away from you, then it doesn’t look nearly so good,” Cotton said. He endorses Trump’s plan to build a wall on the Mexican border—“Walls work,” he often says—and is a lead sponsor of a bill, strongly supported by the White House, that would cut legal immigration roughly in half. (Cotton’s views on immigration are debatable in every particular. It’s far from clear that a border wall with Mexico would “work” to stop illegal immigration in any meaningful way. Most economists believe that immigrants, legal and otherwise, add more to the economy than they take from it, and that their presence in the labor force does not lead to lower wages over all.)

As a legislator, Cotton has shown little deference to his elders. John Cornyn, the senior senator from Texas, told me that new senators used to sit back for a while. “But Tom proved right away that he was very engaged and knowledgeable,” Cornyn said. “He probably knows more about geopolitics than most senators.” In March of his first year in the Senate, Cotton wrote an open letter to the “Leaders of the Islamic Republic of Iran,” which was co-signed by forty-six other Republican senators, warning the mullahs that Congress might undo any agreement they reached with Obama. The letter was denounced by Executive Branch officials as an attempt to interfere in a diplomatic initiative, but Cotton regards it as a triumph. In his recent speech at the Council on Foreign Relations, he boasted about the letter: “Didn’t I warn the ayatollahs that this deal might not survive if it wasn’t a treaty? I think I did.”

When I asked Cotton what he learned during the Iraq War, he replied, “Security comes first.” He continued, “In 2003, there were a lot of grand ambitions of what a postwar Iraq would look like, and all the different things that needed to happen. And we neglected the most basic thing, which is physical security for the people there and for our troops. You see that now in Afghanistan as well. You see it in so many places around the world. You simply cannot neglect security, and without security there cannot be political compromise and reconciliation, there cannot be good governance, there cannot be economic development, there can’t be anything.”

If Rand Paul is the leading Republican isolationist in the Senate, Cotton, in short order, has become heir to the opposing wing of the Party, the one associated with Senator John McCain, whose efforts to increase the defense budget Cotton has championed. “Tom is a veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan. He’s got mud on his boots,” McCain told me. “That means he has special credibility on those issues, just like the World War Two generation did around here for a long time. We need Tom and people like him.” But Cotton has gone well past McCain in his swaggering belligerence. In a February, 2015, hearing of the Armed Services Committee, Cotton announced that he favored keeping open the detention facility at Guantánamo Bay. “In my opinion, the only problem with Guantánamo Bay is there are too many empty beds and cells there right now,” Cotton said. “We should be sending more terrorists there for further interrogation to keep this country safe. As far as I’m concerned, every last one of them can rot in hell, but as long as they don’t do that they can rot in Guantánamo Bay.” (Even McCain favors closing Guantánamo, which he believes stains the reputation of the United States and serves as a recruitment tool for terrorists.)

During the last days of the Obama Administration, Cotton also helped to sabotage a criminal-justice-reform bill, which had a meaningful chance of passage. Senator Cornyn, the second-ranking Republican, was pushing the bill, which would have ended mandatory minimum sentences for some narcotics offenders. Cotton took the public lead in making statements about the proposal which, as with his comments on Guantánamo, skirted the edge of demagoguery. “I don’t think any Republicans want legislation that is going to let out violent felons, which this bill would do,” Cotton said. His rhetoric helped turn a difficult political challenge into an impossible one, and the Republican leadership in the Senate never even brought the bill up for a vote. Cotton told me, “I think most Arkansans believe they elected me to help keep dangerous people in prison.” Jeff Sessions, Trump’s Attorney General, shares Cotton’s disdain for criminal-justice reform, and the move toward shorter sentences at the federal level has halted.

For some Democrats, however, Cotton made his name in the Senate in a more personally poisonous way. In his first year, Cotton placed a hold on Obama’s nominations for the Ambassadors to Sweden, Norway, and the Bahamas, because of an unrelated dispute regarding the Secret Service. As months passed, Cotton released the holds on the Sweden and Norway envoys—because, he said, those countries were NATO allies—but he prevented a vote on Cassandra Butts, an old friend of the President’s, as the Ambassador to the Bahamas. Butts had been waiting for a Senate vote for eight hundred and thirty-five days when, in May, 2016, she died suddenly, of an undiagnosed cancer. Cotton said, “I feel very badly about her death and the timing of it. I wish the White House had just addressed this much earlier.” Still, Cotton’s actions left a bitter aftertaste for some of his colleagues. “I thought what he did was outrageous,” Richard Durbin, an Illinois Democrat and the assistant minority leader, said. “There is a point where winning a political battle isn’t worth it.”

For the moment, at least, Cotton appears to be a hybrid of insurgent and old guard, who can play successfully to the warring constituencies of the Republican Party. As Bannon put it, “How many guys in town can give a speech at the Council on Foreign Relations and also get kudos in the pages of Breitbart? The answer is, one guy.”

Cotton has carved out a clear Trumpism-without-Trump agenda: limits on immigration throughlegislation, deportations, and a wall; longer prison sentences for American convicts and suspected terrorists abroad; a bigger budget for the Department of Defense. The question is whether he has the charisma to sell that agenda to a broader public. Recently, at his Little Rock office, Cotton presented several medals to the family of George Anderson, a Second World War veteran who had died in 2006. Cotton began with a solemn introduction, but then, unexpectedly, Anderson’s family members, most of whom were elderly, took over the proceedings and began telling stories about George, who had made his living running car washes and coin-operated laundries. Cotton’s staff members and the assembled local reporters began chuckling at the rambling accounts of how George stacked his coins. A more deft politician might have joined in the fun, but Cotton just stood there, seemingly paralyzed by the deviations from good order. The ceremony came to a close when George Anderson’s surviving sister turned to Cotton and said, “As for you—you keep standing up for our President.” ♦

An earlier version of this article included an erroneous anecdote about a dorm-room discussion during Cotton’s freshman year.

10 Horrifying Facts About GOP Senator Tom Cotton
 

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Hailing from Arkansas, 37-year-old Senator Cotton boasts the title of being the youngest member of the Senate, but he spouts the old warmongering rhetoric of 78-year-old Senator John McCain. From Guantanamo to Iran, food stamps to women’s rights, here are ten reasons why Tom Cotton is a dangerous dude.

1. He penned an underhanded letter to the leaders of Iran that sparked the trending hashtag #47Traitors. On March 9th, Cotton and 46 of his Republican colleagues went behind President Obama’s back by signing an “informative” letter to Iran, saying that a nuclear deal would not last because the next president could reverse it. Secretary John Kerry, one of the lead negotiators in the talks, called the letter “utterly disgusting” and “irresponsible.” Two dozen editorial boards slammed the letter and over 200,000 people signed a petition asking the senators to be charged for violating the Logan Act, a law which forbids unauthorized citizens from negotiating with foreign governments.

2. Senator Cotton said the only problem he has with Guantanamo Bay prison is that “there are too many empty beds.” Ignoring waterboarding, indefinite detention, forced feeding and other torturous acts, Tom Cotton insists that the US should be “proud” of how it treats the “savages” detained in Gitmo. As far as Cotton is concerned, “[the prisoners] can rot in hell. But as long as they don’t do that, then they can rot in Guantanamo Bay.” This is counter to the position of many other Senators and President Obama, who has promised time and time again to close the prison. There are still dozens of men held at Gitmo who have been cleared for release, but that doesn’t seem to bother Senator They-Can-Rot-in-Hell.

3. He has compared the negotiations of the UN Security Council (P5+1) with Iran to the “appeasement of Nazi Germany.”This accusation is ridiculous. Rouhani’s Iran is not Hitler’s Germany. Despite Cotton’s claims that “there are nothing but hardliners in Tehran,” Rouhani is a reformist, someone we need to work with to defeat ISIL. And the ongoing nuclear negotiations with Iran are a far better ––and safer–– approach than pushing Iran to the brink of war with the US (and Israel). For once, there is actually hope for a peaceful solution, something that certainly was not an option with Nazi Germany.

4. He thinks the use of killer drones should be expanded. Killer drones have resulted in thousands of civilian deaths in countries we’re not even at war with, like Pakistan and Yemen, and have led to an expansion of extremist groups. Senator Cotton makes the argument of many other pro-droners: that drone pilots are safer than air pilots, and casualties are reduced. Unfortunately, it’s not that simple. Drone pilots still suffer the psychological trauma associated with attacks, and the “collateral damage” of drone strikes means that families and children lose their lives along with the targeted terrorists. (Note: only 2% of all people killed by drone strikes have been confirmed “high-value” targets.) The last thing we need is the expansion of drone warfare, Tom.

5. He claims that “bombing makes us safer.” While in some masochistic, twisted logic that might make sense in the short term, historically speaking US military intervention has led to more extremism–– as with the formation of ISIS after the invasion of Iraq ––and turned local populations against the United States. Ultimately, bombing other countries just fosters more hate and anti-American sentiment. Bombing might not make us safer, but it certainly makes Tom Cotton’s friends in the defense industry a whole lot richer. Just 24 hours after his notorious letter to Iran became public, Cotton was the guest of honor at an event hosted by the National Defense Industrial Association, a lobbying and professional group for defense contractors.

6. He uses fear-mongering to call for a crackdown on immigrants and a clampdown on the Mexican border. Senator Cotton says drug cartels in Mexico are ready to expand into human trafficking and even terrorism, and could infiltrate our southern border and “attack it right here in places like Arkansas.” He’s made the wild accusation that Hezbollah is collaborating with locals in Mexico to “cross our borders and attack us here.” Ignoring the fences, drones, cameras and patrols that constantly survey the border, he maintains that the border is wide open. “As long as our border is open and it’s defenseless, then it’s not just an immigration issue, it’s a national security issue.” Be afraid, says Cotton, very afraid–so I can keep feeding the national security state!

7. He received $700,000 for his senate campaign from the Emergency Committee for Israel.That’s correct — $700,000! Such an exorbitant amount of money ensures that Cotton is one of the most pro-Israel senators in Congress. During the 2014 Israeli invasion of Gaza, when over 500 Palestinian were killed, Cotton called the Israeli defense force “the most moral, humanitarian fighting force in the world.” In December he said Congressshould consider supplying Israel with B-52s and so-called “bunker-buster” bombs for a possible strike against Iran.

8. As an Army Lieutenant in 2006, Cotton called for the prosecution of two New York Times journalists for espionage.From his early days, Cotton has not been a fan of expository journalism. When the New York Times published an article about how the government was tracking terrorist financing, Cotton called for the journalists to be imprisoned. This news story got a lot of heat from various conservative outlets, but before he was even running for office, Cotton took it upon himself to publicize his grievances in a sarcastic letter to journalists Eric Lichtblau and James Risen. It seems that Cotton’s letter to Iran a few days ago was not the first of its kind.

9. He thinks food-stamp recipients are “addicts.”Senator Cotton hates food stamps. In his own words, he thinks the system is “riddled with fraud and abuse” and “has resulted in long-term dependency.” This is coming from the senator of Arkansas, which ranked number one in the number of residents who suffer from food insecurity. If Cotton had his way, there would be much harsher restrictions on food stamps, and the overall budget for welfare would be cut severely. Considering the high level of poverty in Arkansas, Cotton is actually voting against the interests of the people he is supposed to represent. If he’s concerned that the system is “riddled with fraud and abuse,” an audit of the Pentagon should be at the top of his to-do list.

10.  He has opposed legislation to expand women’s rights.Senator Cotton voted against equal pay legislation and the Violence Against Women Act. While Senator Cotton’s website will say that the vote was taken out of context, and that the Senator supports harsh punishment for sexual assault, a vote is a vote. If that’s the case, then why would he vote against an act that would give women more resources in the case of abuse or assault? And why would he vote against legislation that would push for equivalent pay? No matter what defense Cotton’s team comes up with, there’s really no logic or excuse to vote against women’s rights.

****

Rep. Alan Grayson says Sen. Cotton is “already on his way to marking himself as the premiere warmonger of the 114th Congress.” Heather Digby Parton from Salon called him“Ted Cruz with a war record, Sarah Palin with a Harvard degree, Chris Christie with a Southern accent.” Whatever your characterization, this much is clear: this freshman senator is an arrogant bully and needs a time out.

Medea Benjamin is cofounder of the peace group CodePink. Her latest book is Kingdom of the Unjust: Behind the U.S.-Saudi Connection (OR Books, September 2016).

Nalini Ramachandran is a student at Northeastern University studying International Affairs and Middle East Studies. She’s currently working in the CODEPINK Washington, DC office.

Mike Flynn Wasn’t Robert Mueller’s ‘Big Fish.’ Why The Trump Team Should Be Worried.
 

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The Huffington PostMike Flynn Wasn’t Robert Mueller’s ‘Big Fish.’ Why The Trump Team Should Be Worried.

Obama issues a warning in India: ‘Think before you tweet’ – Washington Post
 

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Obama issues a warning in India: ‘Think before you tweet’
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Former president Barack Obama made a few pointed jibes without actually naming President Trump in remarks in New Delhi on Friday, taking on social media, climate-change deniers and religious intolerance. In a discussion period at a leadership 
Obama meets with Dalai Lama in New DelhiCNN
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Hey, birds: do you think before you tweet? – Google Search
 

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Obama on social media: You’ve got to ‘think before you tweet’ | TheHill

thehill.com/…/362729-obama-on-social-media-youve-got-to-think-before-you-tweet

11 hours ago – Former President Obama offered advice on how to use social media on Friday, saying users should think before they post on platforms like Twitter. “Michelle was giving the general idea … that don’t say the first thing that pops in your head. Have a little bit of an edit function … think before youspeak, think …

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Obama’s sage advice: Think before you tweet | New York Post

<a href=”https://nypost.com/2017/12/01/obamas-sage-advice-think-before-you-tweet/” rel=”nofollow”>https://nypost.com/2017/12/01/obamas-sage-advice-think-before-you-tweet/</a>

9 hours ago – “Have a little bit of an edit function, think before you speak, think before you tweet,” Obama said at the Hindustan Times Leadership Summit in New Delhi, … “I can have a debate with someone about climate change and about what we need to do, but if you call climate change a hoax, I don’t know what to do …

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Flynn enters guilty plea, will cooperate with Mueller – The Hill
 

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Flynn enters guilty plea, will cooperate with Mueller
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President Trump’s short-lived first national security adviser, Michael Flynn, on Friday morning pleaded guilty to lying to FBI agents in one of the most dramatic developments yet in special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian 
Michael Flynn’s guilty plea: A comprehensive timelineWashington Post
Michael Flynn, ex-Trump aide, pleads guilty to lying to FBI, pledges to cooperateUSA TODAY
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Work orders from the White House include requests to take care of mice, ants and cockroaches. (iStock). There’s a mouse in the White House. Maintenance workers were requested to take care of mice in the Situation Room and the White House Navy mess food 
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11:52 AM 12/1/2017 – The Operation Silk Road – The World News and Times
 

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The Operation “Silk Road”: Please, meet (for now) the CIA Director, and our Designated Future President…
 

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The Operation “Silk Road”: Please, meet (for now) the CIA Director, and our Designated Future President, Mr. Silk (codename Cotton). Yea-yeah, the same one who six years ago was just a kid looking for a job…
8:10 AM 12/1/2017 – Sen. Cotton or Dir. Silk, you still gotta serve somebody – Trump Investigations …
 

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8:10 AM 12/1/2017 – Sen. Cotton or Dir. Silk, you still gotta serve somebody – Trump Investigations Report
2:33 PM 11/30/2017 – Michael Flynn, Trump’s ex-National Security Adviser, focus of Russia investigation…
 

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2:33 PM 11/30/2017 – Michael Flynn, Trump’s ex-National Security Adviser, focus of Russia investigation…
2:19 PM 11/30/2017 – NYPD cop charged with trying to traffic three kilos of heroin
 

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2:19 PM 11/30/2017 – NYPD cop charged with trying to traffic three kilos of heroin
1:51 PM 11/30/2017 – Michael Flynn, Trump’s ex-National Security Adviser, focus of Russia investigation…
 

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1:51 PM 11/30/2017 – Michael Flynn, Trump’s ex-National Security Adviser, focus of Russia investigation: What to know – Fox News
1:45 PM 11/30/2017 – Trump Wants to Install a Reliable Mouthpiece on Russia at the CIA – Mother Jones…
 

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1:45 PM 11/30/2017 – Trump Wants to Install a Reliable Mouthpiece on Russia at the CIA – Mother Jones
12:05 PM 11/30/2017 – Donald Trump Attacks China For Having ‘No Impact On Little Rocket Man’
 

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12:05 PM 11/30/2017 – Donald Trump Attacks China For Having ‘No Impact On Little Rocket Man’
10:49 AM 11/30/2017 – Pompeo has also chafed at the restrictions inherent in running the C.I.A., where…
 

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10:49 AM 11/30/2017 – Pompeo has also chafed at the restrictions inherent in running the C.I.A., where he has been expected to be neither seen nor heard.

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The Operation “Silk Road”: Please, meet (for now) the CIA Director, and our Designated Future President…

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The Operation “Silk Road”: Please, meet (for now) the CIA Director, and our Designated Future President, Mr. Silk (codename Cotton). Yea-yeah, the same one who six years ago was just a kid looking for a job…

8:10 AM 12/1/2017 – Sen. Cotton or Dir. Silk, you still gotta serve somebody – Trump Investigations …

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2:33 PM 11/30/2017 – Michael Flynn, Trump’s ex-National Security Adviser, focus of Russia investigation…

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2:19 PM 11/30/2017 – NYPD cop charged with trying to traffic three kilos of heroin

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1:51 PM 11/30/2017 – Michael Flynn, Trump’s ex-National Security Adviser, focus of Russia investigation: What to know – Fox News

1:45 PM 11/30/2017 – Trump Wants to Install a Reliable Mouthpiece on Russia at the CIA – Mother Jones…

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10:49 AM 11/30/2017 – Pompeo has also chafed at the restrictions inherent in running the C.I.A., where he has been expected to be neither seen nor heard.

Today’s Headlines and Commentary 

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Michael Flynn, the former national security adviser, pleaded guilty on Friday for lying to the FBI about his conversations with the Russian ambassador, the New York Times reported. Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s office charged Flynn with one count of making false statements to the FBI about two meetings with Sergei Kislyak in which Flynn and Kislyak discussed U.S. sanctions and a U.N. Security Council resolution. The charge is an indication that Flynn is cooperating with the special counsel investigation.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This story is developing quickly and Lawfare’s coverage of current reporting is likely to be overtaken by events throughout the day.

Pope Francis said, “the presence of God today is also called Rohingya,” marking the first time the pope has used the term for Myanmar’s Muslim ethnic group during his visit to Southeast Asia, Reuters reported. The pope gave remarks after meeting Rohingya refugees in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s capital. More than 600,000 Rohingya have fled Myanmar after a campaign of military that the U.N. has termed “ethnic cleansing.” The pope did not use the word “Rohingya” when he visited Myanmar earlier this week.

Saudi Arabia’s air force intercepted a ballistic missile launched from Yemen. The attack is the second this month, CNN reported. A Saudi military spokesperson said the missile was headed towards a Saudi city near the Yemen border. Houthi rebels in Yemen said the attack was a successful test. A missile fired at the Riyadh airport on Nov. 4 prompted the Saudi-led coalition fighting Houthi rebels in Yemen to blockade all the country’s ports. The U.N. sanctions monitor said on Wednesday that Iran had designed and manufactured those missiles, according to Reuters. The U.N. report said it did not have any evidence who supplied the missile to the Houthis. Iran has denied smuggling weapons in defiance of U.N. sanctions.

Reza Zarrab, the Turkish-Iranian businessman who plead guilty to evading U.S. sanctions, testified that Turkish government officials told him that Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan approved his scheme to illegally move millions of dollars of Iranian oil sales, the Washington Post reported. Zarrab is cooperating with federal prosecutors in the trial of one of his co-conspirators. The Turkish government has castigated the trial as a plot by Erdogan’s enemies to challenge his credibility.

Over the summer, President Trump pushed top Senate Republicans to close out congressional investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 election, the New York Times reported. The president told Sen. Richard Burr, the chairman of the Senate intelligence committee, that he was hopeful the inquiry would “as quickly as possible.” Trump angrily denounced the Russia investigation to other top lawmakers, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Sen. Bob Corker. The White House denied that the president had tried to improperly influence the investigation.

Erik Prince, founder of the security firm Blackwater, confirmed to congressional investigators that he secretly met a Russian banker close to President Vladimir Putin to discuss a U.S.-Russia communications channel, according to the Post. Prince confirmed that his counterpart at the previously reported meeting was Kirill Dimitriev, head of the Russian Direct Investment Fund. Prince denied that he was acting on behalf of the Trump campaign.

Attorney General Jeff Session refused to answer questions from congressional investigators in a closed hearing about whether Trump had ever attempted to interfere with the Justice Department’s Russia investigation, Reuters reported. Rep. Adam Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the House intelligence committee, said Sessions declined to answer questions about President Trump’s interactions with Sessions regarding the investigation.

The Defense Department disclosed that it has not yet provided a lawyer to the American citizen believed to be an Islamic State fighter being detained as an enemy combatant despite the man’s request for counsel, the Times reported. Justice Department lawyers provided the information in response to an order from D.C. District Court Judge Tanya Chutkan in a habeas petition the ACLU brought on behalf of the man. The FBI has not questioned the man since he asked for a lawyer. The government has not charged the man with any crime and it is unclear whether it plans to transfer him to any other country for detention.

Israel bombed targets in Gaza in response to mortar fire from Palestinian militants, the Post reported. The Israeli military said it hit Hamas military sites. The mortar fire came after Israel destroyed a tunnel that the Islamic Jihad militant organization had built under the Israel-Gaza border.

The White House is considering a plan to relocate the U.S. embassy in Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, the Wall Street Journal reported. The move would also involve formally recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. The plan is not yet official, but it could spark strident opposition from Palestinians and cause complications with the Israel-Palestine peace process. On Friday, the president will face a deadline on whether to issue a waiver that would allow the U.S. to keep its embassy in Tel Aviv, delaying provisions of the 1995 Jerusalem Embassy Act from taking effect.

The U.S. will withdraw 400 Marines from Syria ahead of schedule after the U.S.-backed campaign against the Islamic State achieved large reductions in the group’s territory, the Journal reported. The Marine unit provided artillery support to the U.S.-backed forces that captured Raqqa, the Islamic State’s former capital, last month. A coalition spokesperson said the move was part of a larger reduction in military commitments as the campaign winds down.

The Syrian government‘s negotiators left U.N. peace talks in Geneva and said they may not return, Reuters reported. The Syrian representatives said the opposition’s collective statement that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad cannot play a role in the country’s political transition made negotiations impossible. The government team said they would consult with political leadership in Damascus on whether to return to the table next week.

Niger’s government gave its approval for armed U.S. drone flights over its territory, the Times reported. The U.S. and Niger signed a memorandum of understanding allowing armed drone flights out of Niamey, the capital, and an expanded military presence in the country. The U.S. is targeting extremist groups across West Africa. Deploying drones in Niger would significantly enlarge the range U.S. drones can cover over West Africa.

Taliban gunmen disguised in burqas attacked a university dormitory in Peshawar, Pakistan, the Times reported. Gunfire killed at least nine people and wounded thirty others. The Pakistani Taliban said its militants had attacked a Pakistani intelligence safe house. Pakistani authorities said there was no intelligence activity at the university.

The Pentagon delayed indefinitely a planned phase-out of certain types of cluster munitions, according to the AP. The Department of Defense said it was unable to fulfill a pledge by President George W. Bush to use cluster munitions that have high safety standards by 2019 and would continue to use its existing stockpile. The U.S. has not signed the 2010 treaty banning the use of cluster bombs.

 

ICYMI: Yesterday on Lawfare

Hayley Evans and Shannon Togawa Mercer discussed Brexit’s implications for data protection regulations.

Evans summarized the UK’s new data protection bill.

Madiha Afzal explained why the Trump’s administration’s strategy in Pakistan is likely doomed to failure.

Curtis Bradley and Jack Goldsmith discussed whether Congress cares that the president has an enormous amount of discretion to interpret international law.

Goldsmith and Robert Williams argued that the recent indictment of three Chinese hackers shows the 2015 U.S.-China cybersecurity agreement is weakening.

Scott Anderson and Yishai Schwartz explained the potential consequences if the president waives the Jerusalem Embassy Act.

Benjamin Wittes posted the “Power of Delusion Thinking” edition of Rational Security.

Susan Hennessey shared her testimony from a congressional hearing on the cybersecurity of voting machines.

 

Email the Roundup Team noteworthy law and security-related articles to include, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook for additional commentary on these issues. Sign up to receive Lawfare in your inbox. Visit our Events Calendar to learn about upcoming national security events, and check out relevant job openings on our Job Board.

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The Early Edition: December 1, 2017 

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Before the start of business, Just Security provides a curated summary of up-to-the-minute developments at home and abroad. Here’s today’s news.

The TRUMP ADMINISTRATION

A plan to replace Secretary of State Rex Tillerson with C.I.A. Director Mike Pompeo has been devised by the White House, senior administration officials said yesterday, with Pompeo to be replaced by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) – who has signaled an intention to accept the role of C.I.A. Director if offered – however officials have said that Trump has not yet signed off on the plan which was devised by White House chief of staff John F. Kelly. Peter Baker, Maggie Haberman and Gardiner Harris report at the New York Times.

“He’s here – Rex is here,” Trump said yesterday in response to a question about Tillerson and whether he wants him to remain as secretary of state, Trump’s comments did not quell rumors about Tillerson’s departure and there have been numerous reports that the president has a poor relationship with the secretary of state. Michael C. Bender and Peter Nicholas report at the Wall Street Journal.

“He remains, as I have been told, committed to doing this job,” the State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said yesterday, making the statement as part of a series of comments by administration officials that tried to downplay the rumors of Tillerson’s departure, separately Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) told reporters that he had spoken to Tillerson in a lengthy conversation and did not believe he was soon to be sacked. Anne Gearan and Carol Morello report at the Washington Post.

Kelly called the State Department to tell them that the “rumors” about a plan to oust Tillerson “are not true,” Nauert said yesterday, the BBC reports.

Nauert pointed out that Tillerson will be going on a tour of Europe next week and had a full week of engagements when asked about the secretary of state’s position, in response to a question about Tillerson’s authority and whether it has been undermined, Nauert responded that Tillerson “is someone whose feathers don’t get ruffled very easily.” Julian Borger and David Smith report at the Guardian.

“There’s nothing to it,” the Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said yesterday in response to reports of Tillerson’s imminent departure. Ellen Mitchell reports at the Hill.

The reports of Tillerson’s departure were disclosed as part of an attempt by the White House to publicly shame the secretary of state, according to a source familiar with the matter, adding that the shaming would be followed by waiting for Tillerson to “punch out.” Michelle Kosinski and Sara Murray report at CNN.

Several senior administration officials claimed that there would be further departures of senior White House aides and Cabinet members as Trump reaches his one-year anniversary in office, the White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said yesterday that “there are no personnel announcements at this time.”  Michael C. Bender reports at the Wall Street Journal.

Diplomats frustrated with Tillerson’s leadership of the State Department have cautiously welcomed the prospect of Pompeo’s appointment, saying that despite his partisan persuasion, they hope that a better relationship with the president would be to the benefit of the department. Nahal Toosi explains at POLITICO.

Pompeo has certain qualities that Tillerson does not possess, however he would be still faced with similar problems regarding the president’s lack of regard for diplomacy and the reports of Pompeo’s potential appointment has drawn a mixed reaction from serving U.S. officials. Arshad Mohammed explains at Reuters.

Pompeo would bring a distinctly political voice to the role of secretary of state, having shown an ideological and politicized approach as C.I.A. director which has aligned with the president’s views on many issues, this would bring the benefit of a better relationship with the president, but would remove a voice of moderation on key foreign policy issues. Mark Landler writes at the New York Times.

Tillerson is arguably unsuited to his role and has presided over a chaotic and demoralizing period at the State Department, however if the personnel changes take place, it would potentially provide Trump with “two more loyal lieutenants” as Pompeo has been pointedly hawkish on key issues, such as on the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, and Cotton is “perhaps the hardest-line hawk in the Senate.” Ishaan Tharoor provides an analysis at the Washington Post.

The appointment of Cotton as C.I.A. Director “would cement his meteoric rise in Republican politics,” which has been achieved through an attempt to “co-opt and shape the president rather than rail against him.” Eliana Johnson and Ali Watkins observe at POLITICO.

Intelligence professionals have questioned Cotton’s credentials and have expressed objection to his characterization of waterboarding and torture, Spencer Ackerman explains at The Daily Beast.

Changes in personnel would “likely be seen as a signal of greater U.S. willingness to use force,” it remains unclear whether bringing in Pompeo and Cotton would lead to substantive policy changes, nevertheless “Pyongyang and Tehran should understand that Washington is recalculating its tolerance for risk.” David Ignatius writes at the Washington Post.

NORTH KOREA

“The Chinese Envoy, who just returned from North Korea, seems to have had no impact on Little Rocket Man,” Trump tweeted yesterday, referring to a recent visit by Chinese President Xi Jinping’s special envoy to Pyongyang and North Korea’s launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile (I.C.B.M.) on Wednesday. Ashley Parker reports at the Washington Post.

The U.S.’s announcement last week of joint military drills with South Korea provoked North Korean leader Kim Jong-un to take “rash action,” the Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov claimed yesterday, accusing the U.S. of escalating tensions and calling for the U.S. to “first of all explain to us what they are trying to achieve.” Nathan Hodge reports at the Wall Street Journal.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson yesterday praised China for “doing a lot” but said they could do more to “restrain” the trade of oil with North Korea, Makini Brice and Andrew Osborn reporting at Reuters.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said yesterday that the U.S. would be “unrelenting” in its pursuit of diplomacy, adding that “our diplomats will speak from a position of strength because we do have military options.” Reuters reporting.

TRUMP-RUSSIA

Trump urged Senate Republicans to try and conclude the Senate Intelligence Committee’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, according to several lawmakers and aides, including the Chairman of the committee Richard Burr (R-N.C.). The former Chairwoman of the committee Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) said that Trump’s requests were “inappropriate” and breached the separation of powers, Jonathan Martin, Maggie Haberman and Alexander Burns report at the New York Times.

During testimony to the House Intelligence Committee, the Trump associate and founder of private military company Blackwater, Erik Prince, confirmed that he had met with a member of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s inner circle in the Seychelles in a secret Jan. 11 meeting. The meeting was brokered by the U.A.E. as part of an apparent attempt to set up backchannel communications between Trump and Russia, according to sources familiar with the interview, however Prince denied that he was representing the Trump transition team during the meeting, Karoun Demirjian reporting at the Washington Post.

A transcript of Prince’s interview is expected to be made public within the next three days, Katie Bo Williams reports at the Hill.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions was evasive when testifying before the House Intelligence Committee in a closed hearing yesterday, according to Democratic lawmakers who attended, the ranking Democrat Rep. Adam Schiff (Calif.) said that he was troubled by Sessions’ refusal to answer critical questions relating to the Russia investigation. Patricia Zengerle and Sarah N. Lynch report at Reuters.

The opposition research firm Fusion G.P.S. would not run afoul of the First Amendment by revealing more of its clients and vendors, U.S. District Court Judge Richard Leon suggested yesterday, the firm commissioned the former British Intelligence officer Christopher Steele to compile a controversial dossier that alleged links between Trump and Russia. Josh Gerstein reports at POLITICO.

Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort reached a bail deal with prosecutors yesterday, Manafort and his co-defendant Rick Gates have had their movement restricted since special counsel Robert Mueller charged them as part of his investigation into Russian interference in the election. Spencer Hsu reports at the Washington Post.

ISRAEL-PALESTINE

A plan to formally recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and to move the U.S. Embassy to the city has been considered by the Trump administration, according to U.S. officials, such a move would likely provoke a strong reaction from Palestinians and potentially undermine peace negotiations. When asked about moving the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv, a White House spokesperson said that the “president has always said it is a matter of when, not if,” Felicia Schwartz, Andrew Ackerman and Rory Jones report at the Wall Street Journal.

“This is a premature report,” the White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in response to rumors of the planned U.S. Embassy move, Andrew Restuccia and Eliana Johnson reporting at POLITICO.

An Israeli soldier was stabbed to death in southern Israel yesterday, hours after Israeli forces struck the Gaza Strip in retaliation for mortar fire. Ilan Ben Zion reports at the Financial Times.

The two sides in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict should focus on incremental changes rather than a comprehensive solution, and the plan to for the division of the Jerusalem municipal area “is a good place to begin.” Peter Berkowitz writes at the Wall Street Journal.

YEMEN

Saudi Arabia intercepted a Houthi rebel missile fired toward the country from Yemen, the Saudi military said today, marking the second launch by the Houthi rebels in Yemen after they fired a ballistic missile on Nov. 4. Jamie Tarabay reports at CNN.   

The Houthi ballistic missiles that were fired into Saudi Arabia this year appear to have been designed and manufactured by Iran, according to a confidential report by U.N. sanctions monitors to the Security Council on Nov. 24, the revelation likely strengthening the Trump administration’s attempts to punish Iran. Michelle Nichols reports at Reuters.

The Saudi-led coalition must “fully” wind down its blockade on Yemen to “avoid an atrocious humanitarian tragedy,” the U.N. humanitarian chief Mark Lowcock said today, Tom Miles reporting at Reuters.

SYRIA

The U.S. is set to pull 400 Marines out of Syria following their successful support of coalition forces and the Syrian Democratic Forces (S.D.F.) in their operation to take the Islamic State-held city of Raqqa, the U.S. Central Command said in a statement yesterday.

“We’re not saying it’s not needed anymore but we’re saying it’s not needed in the volume we’ve had it,” the spokesperson for the U.S.-led coalition Col. Ryan Dillon said yesterday in relation to troop deployments in Syria and the withdrawal of the Marines. Ben Kesling reporting at the Wall Street Journal.

The U.N.-backed peace talks on Syria have been extended until mid-December, the U.N. special envoy to Syria Staffan de Mistura said yesterday, emphasizing that the talks should have “no preconditions.” The U.N. News Centre reports.

U.S.-led airstrikes continue. U.S. and coalition forces carried out 11 airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Syria and Iraq between November 24 and November 26. [Central Command]

U.S.-U.K. RELATIONS

“The fact that we work together does not mean that we are afraid to say we think the United States has got it wrong,” the British Prime Minister Theresa May said yesterday, responding to Trump’s sharing of content from the far-right, anti-Islam political group “Britain First” on his Twitter account. Jason Douglas and Jenny Gross report at the Wall Street Journal, noting the impact the president’s actions have had on the “special relationship.”

Trump’s visit is unlikely to be officially canceled, despite the outrage across the political spectrum in the U.K. at Trump’s actions, Amanda Erickson explains at the Washington Post.

The British government were “within their rights to tell the U.S. President to butt out,” and Trump should be aware that the U.K. remains the “indispensable ally to the U.S. in the political and economic affairs of the world,” the Wall Street Journal editorial board writes.

The U.K. should rescind its invitation to Trump for a state visit, Matthew D’Ancona writes at the New York Times.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

The U.S. Defense Department was granted permission by the government of Niger to deploy armed drones from its capital, Pentagon officials said yesterday, the agreement was made through a memorandum of understanding and drone operations could begin within days. Helene Cooper and Eric Schmitt report at the New York Times.

Taliban militants in Pakistan killed at least nine people and wounded at least 30 in an attack in the city of Peshawar today, according to officials, Ismail Khan reporting at the New York Times.

The American citizen who apparently fought for the Islamic State group in Iraq and was captured by the U.S. in mid-September has been informed of his right to counsel, however the Department of Justice said yesterday that “due to his current situation, it was unknown when he would be able to have an attorney.” Katie Bo Williams reports at the Hill.

Members of the Taliban in Afghanistan have defected to Islamic State group in the northern Jawzjan province, providing the Islamic State with a new foothold which has drawn the attention of U.S. forces. Matin Sahak and Girish Gupta report at Reuters.

The Defense Department has indefinitely postponed a planned policy banning the use of certain cluster bombs by 2019, the Pentagon spokesperson Tom Crossen saying in a statement yesterday that “cluster munitions remain a vital military capability.” Ellen Mitchell reports at the Hill.

A package of secret proposals that would allow for private companies to run covert operations and rendition programs has been considered by the White House and the C.I.A., Aram Roston reveals at BuzzFeed News.

The Libyan Prime Minister Fayez el-Sarraj yesterday expressed hope that the U.N.-imposed arms embargo would be partially lifted, making the comments ahead of a meeting with Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and a meeting today with President Trump. Reuters reports.

The Iranian-Turkish businessman Reza Zarrab claimed that the Turkish President Reçep Tayyip Erdoğan personally intervened in a scheme allowing Iran to avoid U.S. and U.N. sanctions, Zarrab said in court testimony in New York yesterday. Jose Pagliery reports at CNN.

Trump has not nominated a single member to work on the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board which reviews the intelligence community, demonstrating the president’s ambivalence toward the intelligence community, Jenna McLaughlin writes at Foreign Policy.

The Trump administration and Saudi Arabia’s goal to curb Iran’s influence in the Middle East has been undermined by a lack of commonality on key issues, particularly how far they are willing to risk a civil war in Lebanon to clamp down on the Iran-backed Lebanese Shi’ite Hezbollah group. Yaroslav Trofimov writes at the Wall Street Journal.

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Group Of Republicans Warn Against Plans To Drill In Fragile Arctic Wildlife Refuge

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“Any development footprint in the refuge stands to disrupt this fragile, critically important landscape,” the 12 House GOP lawmakers wrote.

Robert Mueller expertly used Michael Flynn to lay a no-win trap for Jared Kushner 

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Two days ago we learned that Special Counsel Robert Mueller recently met with Jared Kushner to discuss Michael Flynn’s role in the Trump-Russia scandal. It stood out as bizarre, considering that we had already learned Mueller was in the process of cutting a deal with Flynn, meaning that Mueller wouldn’t need any more testimony against Flynn. This morning Flynn did indeed cut that deal. Now that the details are leaking out, it’s become clear why Mueller went back and met with Kushner: it was a trap.

Flynn has testified that while he was illegally communicating with the Russian Ambassador about sanctions on December 29th, he was relaying those conversations in real time to Jared Kushner at Mar-a-Lago (link). In other words, Flynn just sent Kushner up the river by pegging him as the ringleader of the Trump-Russia conspiracy. Of course Flynn will have to provide evidence of this beyond merely his own word, but Mueller has given him a sweetheart deal, suggesting that Flynn does indeed have overwhelming evidence. The key here, however, is Mueller’s last minute meeting with Kushner.

Based on the timeline as we now know it, Mueller went back and met with Kushner after Flynn had begun negotiating a deal, but before word of that deal became public. In other words, Kushner didn’t know at the time that Flynn had already ratted him out. Mueller met with Kushner in order to lay a perjury trap by asking him about the events that Flynn had already spelled out.

We don’t yet know whether Jared Kushner fell into that perjury trap, or if he told Robert Mueller the truth. But either way he’s facing trouble. If he admitted to being Flynn’s point man for the Russian sanctions conspiracy, then he just confessed to a serious crime. And if he lied about it, then Mueller has him nailed for lying to a federal investigator, which is an imprisonable felony. If Flynn’s evidence against Kushner is as good as Mueller seems to think it is, then Kushner is screwed one way or the other.

The post Robert Mueller expertly used Michael Flynn to lay a no-win trap for Jared Kushner appeared first on Palmer Report.

erdogan trump – Google Search

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Trump speaks with Erdogan about crisis in Syria

PoliticoNov 24, 2017
President Donald Trump and his Turkish counterpart on Friday discussed by phone the crisis in Syria and other issues, including ties between the United States and Turkey, according to a White House readout of the call. “President Trump and President Erdogan underscored the need to end the …
ErdoğanTrump vow to fight against ‘all’ terror groups
InternationalYeni Şafak EnglishNov 25, 2017
Trump tells Turkey’s leader: US to stop arming Syrian Kurds
In-DepthWashington PostNov 24, 2017
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USA TODAY

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Washington Examiner

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The Independent

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Reuters

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Business Insider

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Daily Sabah
Story image for erdogan trump from Business Insider

Trump and Turkey’s Erdogan ‘on the same wavelength’ for the first …

Business InsiderNov 28, 2017
ANKARA (Reuters) – Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan said on Tuesday his talks with U.S. President Donald Trump last week were the first occasion in a long time the two NATO allies were “on the same wavelength” and they would speak against this week. Diplomatic ties between Ankara and Washington …
Erdoğan says he will talk to Trump again amid YPG dispute
InternationalHurriyet Daily NewsNov 28, 2017
Turkey Demands Trump Honor Purported Pledge to Cut Off …
In-DepthVoice of AmericaNov 27, 2017
ErdoganTrump to talk again in coming days
InternationalAnadolu AgencyNov 28, 2017
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Reuters

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Hurriyet Daily News

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Anadolu Agency

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Daily Sabah

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Haaretz

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Al-Monitor
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giuliani and trump – Google Search

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Turkish Gold Trader Suggests That Rudy Giuliani Negotiated …

The Daily CallerNov 29, 2017
A month after Giuliani and Mukasey’s meeting with Erdogan, Trump fired Preet Bharara, the U.S. attorney who was initially handling the Zarrab case. The move caught Bharara by surprise. Though an Obama appointee, Trump had told him just after the election that he would keep his position during the new …
Reza Zarrab takes the stand in trial straining US-Turkish ties
<a href=”http://NBCNews.com” rel=”nofollow”>NBCNews.com</a>Nov 29, 2017
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Daily Beast

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New York Times

Trump taps golf club members for posts

Long Island Business News1 hour ago
Callista Gngrich, named envoy to the Vatican, and her husband, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, have both been members of Trump’s Northern Virginia golf club, according to USA Today. Andrew Giuliani, Rudy Giuliani’s son and a member of Trump National Golf Club in Westchester, is the White …

Is It Giuliani’s Turn in the Flynn/Trump/Turkey Barrel?

TPM (blog)Nov 29, 2017
GOP Senators Criticize Trump Retweets Of Anti-Muslim Videos about 10 hours ago. After President Donald Trump on Wednesday morning retweeted several anti-Muslim videos from a far-right.
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rudy giuliani russia – Google Search

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Rudy Giuliani turns up in Ukraine with pro-Russia official linked to …

Raw StoryNov 20, 2017
Former Trump campaign surrogate Rudy Giuliani was seen this week in the Ukraine with a pro-Russiaofficial who is linked to Ukrainian political clients of former Trump campaign chief Paul Manafort. The Palmer Report was first to note on Monday that a news publication in the Ukraine had published …
Story image for rudy giuliani russia from Daily Beast

Crook Claims Rudy Giuliani and Michael Mukasey Tried to Broker …

Daily BeastNov 29, 2017
Giuliani and Mukasey avoided mentioning the “central role” of Iran in the charges against Zarrab on filings submitted to the court about their work and said the case had no serious implications for U.S. national security. Judge Richard Berman slammed the omissions as “disingenuous” earlier this year.
Story image for rudy giuliani russia from Slate Magazine (blog)

Why a Gold Trader’s Plea Deal Is a Big Deal for US Foreign Policy …

Slate Magazine (blog)Nov 28, 2017
The Zarrab case itself is complicated to begin with, and is also tied to a dizzying number of ongoing geopolitical stories—from Turkey’s political crackdown to the investigation of the Trump campaign’s connections to Russia—and involves figures including Rudy Giuliani, Michael Flynn, and Turkish President …
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Rudy Giuliani – Google Search

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Crook Claims Rudy Giuliani and Michael Mukasey Tried to Broker …

Daily BeastNov 29, 2017
Giuliani and Mukasey avoided mentioning the “central role” of Iran in the charges against Zarrab on filings submitted to the court about their work and said the case had no serious implications for U.S. national security. Judge Richard Berman slammed the omissions as “disingenuous” earlier this year.
Media image for Rudy Giuliani from The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller

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New York Magazine

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New York Daily News

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The News Tribune

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Bloomberg

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Voice of America
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Turkish gold trader linked to Flynn and Giuliani could start testifying …

Raw StoryNov 28, 2017
A Turkish-Iranian gold trader linked to both Mike Flynn and Rudy Giuliani has agreed to cooperate with U.S. prosecutors. Reza Zarrab was scheduled to stand trial earlier this month in New York, where the U.S. attorney had filed charges in an international corruption case, but his lawyer confirmed an …
Turkish Gold Trader Confirmed as Witness in Sanctions Case
Courthouse News ServiceNov 28, 2017
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Rudy Giuliani Could Be Facing Felony Charges In Reza Zarrab Case

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Rudy Giuliani May Be Going to Prison

Rudy Giuliani is famous for being the former mayor of New York City during the terrorist attacks in 2001. He helped the city get back on its feet and made the city even stronger than before. For those efforts, he deserves a ton of respect.

Nevertheless, there’s a possibility that he will be heading to jail. The reason is that Giuliani may have played a critical role in rigging the 2016 presidential election in order to help his friend Donald Trump see victory. If this is true, that could mean he broke the law.

The Background Story

Before getting into politics, Giuliani practiced law in New York City. After getting out of politics, Giuliani got back to practicing law again.

This led Giuliani to work alongside Michael Mukasey (who was appointed Attorney General by George W. Bush) in order to try to broker a prisoner exchange with Turkey. Giuliani and Mukasey were representing Reza Zarrab, who is from Turkey and has links to Turkish government officials. In the end, there was no exchange of prisoners between the United States and Turkey. (Source: “Crook Claims Rudy Giuliani and Michael Mukasey Tried to Broker U.S.-Turkey Prisoner Swap,” The Daily Beast, November 29,2017.)

Reza Zarrab<a href=”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6F5L6pV2w0″ rel=”nofollow”>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6F5L6pV2w0</a>

Zarrab needed to be represented by lawyers because he was a gold trader who was allegedly involved in a multi-million-dollar cash-for-gold scheme to help Turkey buy oil from Iran and get around the sanctions against Iran. There was no success in the case, and Zarrab remain in America.

Zarrab feels that Giuliani was trying to sabotage the trial for his own personal interest. Things then took another turn, with Giuliani just disappearing. Now Zarrab is co-operating with U.S. officials and informing them of all the details he knows about Rudy Giuliani.

Zarrab has told his side of the story, including more than €45.0 million that he used to bribe a former Turkish minister of economy. He did that so he would be allowed to trade gold with Iran even though there are sanctions in place. The plan was to split the profit margins of the transactions 50-50. Zarrab disclosed how a gold trade would work from the start to the end. He also explained how the parties involved would conduct their business. (Source: Ibid.)

In terms of client-lawyer confidentially there were no laws being broken by Zarrab. Since there is a possibility that Giuliani broke the law, Zarrab was allowed to speak about his interactions with Giuliani.

Did Rudy Giuliani Take on Representing Reza Zarrab to Protect Himself?

A lawyer always has a decision of not representing a client if they choose to do so. When looking at all the facts, it seems that Giuliani took on the Zarrab case in order to protect himself.

First off, Giuliani is good friends with Donald Trump. This was even before Trump got into the political world. This, of course, is no indication that there was any wrongdoing.

However, one suspicious move by President Trump is that he did not give Giuliani a high-ranking role in his administration. There had been many rumors that Giuliani was going to be named vice president; instead, Giuliani only took an informal role as a cybersecurity advisor. This is quite surprising, due to vast amount of experience that Giuliani has in politics.

A major reason for not being appointed to a high-ranking position is because Giuliani most likely would have not been approved by the senate committee. This is due to the fact of possible rigging of votes in the 2016 presidential campaign. In addition, there is the possibility that he worked with the FBI by gaining information about Hillary Clinton.  Giuliani told Fox News that he had information about the Clinton e-mail scandal  before it was public knowledge.  (Source: “FBI Investigating Possible Leaks To Rudy Giuliani About Hillary Clinton Email Investigation,” Huffington Post, May 3, 2017.)

By being involved in the case, it gave Giuliani a first-hand look at all the information in the matter. In addition, it gave Giuliani the possibility of helping his friend Trump if his name were to come up in the manner.

Therefore, by Giuliani having an “informal” role in Trump’s administration, it still gave the two a working relationship.

Bill Palmer Claims that Giuliani Is Going to Prison

Bill Palmer is the senior editor and founder of The Palmer Report, said,

Whatever extra-legal antics Rudy Giuliani was carrying out to try to sabotage the trial of Reza Zarrab earlier this year, Zarrab surely knows the ugly details. Now that Zarrab has flipped, he must and will give up Giuliani. Because Giuliani was breaking the law to try to help Zarrab, attorney-client privilege doesn’t apply. It means Giuliani is going to prison – and he might have to cut a deal against Trump just to avoid a particularly long sentence.

(Source: “Key Witness Flips, Rudy Giuliani Now Implicated…But He’s Suddenly Disappeared,” Bluedot Daily, November 30, 2017.)

Can the Former Mayor Really Go to Prison?

There is a long list of political figures who have gone to jail for their actions. So, regardless of what they did for the country, breaking the law is a serious matter. Interference in the 2016 presidential election is not a joking matter. The time that Giuliani could spend in jail would be determined by a judge.

Giuliani could see jail time, but it will be related to events that have occurred relating to the 2016 presidential election. It seems that he used his previous contacts as a political figure to gain access to FBI confidential information regarding Hillary Clinton’s e-mail case. Since he has a relationship to Donald Trump, the information could have been shared and used during the campaign, which would be breaking the law.

Also, it could be possible that there was interference from Turkey and Russia in the 2016 election, with Giuliani working with these foreign governments. Again, this would be breaking the law. If any of this is tru,e than it could lead to Giuliani going to jail.

Of course, no one is guilty until it is proven. This is where Reza Zarrab comes into play. Zarrab seems to have information related to Giuliani interfering in the election; this is where charges could be laid. This would then result in the former mayor seeing possible jail time.

Robert Mueller and his special investigation team will investigate Rudy Giuliani for any interference in the 2016 presidential election. It is quite possible that Mueller interviews Reza Zarrab as part of this investigation.

It does not help Giuliani’s case that he seems to be hiding from the public. Some may think it means he has done something wrong. With Giuliani being a public figure, it’s possible that someone will find and broadcast his current hiding position on social media .

If Giuliani is guilty, it may be best to come out of hiding and attempt to make a deal in order to see fewer charges.

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Rudy Giuliani – Google News: Is Rudy Giuliani Facing Serious Felony Charges in the Reza Zarrab Case? – Lombardi Letter

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Is Rudy Giuliani Facing Serious Felony Charges in the Reza Zarrab Case?
Lombardi Letter
Rudy Giuliani is famous for being the former mayor of New York City during the terrorist attacks in 2001. He helped the city get back on its feet and made the city even stronger than before. For those efforts, he deserves a ton of respect. Nevertheless 

 Rudy Giuliani – Google News

Is Rudy Giuliani Facing Serious Felony Charges in the Reza Zarrab Case? – Lombardi Letter

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Is Rudy Giuliani Facing Serious Felony Charges in the Reza Zarrab Case?
Lombardi Letter
Rudy Giuliani is famous for being the former mayor of New York City during the terrorist attacks in 2001. He helped the city get back on its feet and made the city even stronger than before. For those efforts, he deserves a ton of respect. Nevertheless 

Criminologists Are Asking Jeff Sessions To Release FBI Crime Data … – FiveThirtyEight

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FiveThirtyEight
Criminologists Are Asking Jeff Sessions To Release FBI Crime Data …
FiveThirtyEight
As Trump tweets, government acts. Welcome to Meanwhile, our recurring look at what federal agencies are up to and how their work affects people’s lives. When da…

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It’s a Gay, Gay, Gay Government

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In many places and at many moments, we still do. But not in Palm Springs. While the names of streets and structures here commemorate its Rat Pack and Republican pasts — there’s Frank Sinatra Drive and, at the airport, the Sonny Bono Concourse — its present is progressive and very, very gay. Democrats handily outnumber Republicans. The local officials I spoke with guessed that anywhere from 20 percent to 40 percent of the city’s residents are gay or lesbian.

The old City Council had just one straight person on it. Moon, a 68-year-old former Navy officer, is the city’s third openly gay mayor. When we chatted, he went through the government’s gay roll call. The city manager: gay. The assistant city manager: gay. The newly hired city clerk: gay.

“You see why having an all-gay City Council is no big deal?” he told me. “Nobody cares anymore.”

Palm Springs so thoroughly embraces L.G.B.T. people that Holstege, who is married to a man, faced questions about whether she was inventing her bisexuality for political gain.

“Social media started to trash her,” said Roberts, 57, who supported her candidacy. “They were saying she’s not really bi, maybe she had an experience in college, and now she wants to sweep up gay dollars and gay votes. So I called her up one day and said: ‘Christy, I’m making the weirdest call I’ve ever made in my entire life. You’re being accused of being fake gay, fake bi. This is a whole new world for me. This is a parallel universe.’ ”

He was backing her, he said, because of her erudition — she has a law degree from Stanford — and her expertise regarding homelessness and affordable housing. But he did care about her truthfulness and wanted her assurance that her critics were off base. She gave that to him.

She gave it to me, too, and said that during her campaign, she in fact shied away from talk about sexual orientation. When I asked her what the new Council’s first order of business should be, she mentioned making it easier for people at the airport to summon Uber or Lyft.

In general the City Council race included little talk about identity politics. Middleton told me that she was seldom asked about being a transgender woman but routinely fielded questions about downtown development and the city’s budget, subjects she knew well because of her extensive involvement in civic organizations. High on her wish list for the city is six more police officers and four more firefighters. That was among her campaign promises.

I asked the police chief, Bryan Reyes, about her victory. He was jubilant. “I just believe — I reallybelieve — in her,” he said. “I’m a straight male. I have no problem doing photo ops, giving her hugs, because of the person she is, what she represents, her work ethic, her character.”

When she and I had lunch, servers and others rushed over to congratulate her. “Do we refer to you as ‘City Councilwoman’ or just plain Lisa?” asked one of the restaurant’s owners, John Paschal.

“Her Exalted,” Middleton suggested, and they both laughed. Then she went back to bending my ear about spurring entrepreneurship in Palm Springs.

She sees the city, which has a population of just under 50,000 people, as a beacon of inclusion. But she also sees it as an example of how Americans “have been sorting ourselves,” with liberals and conservatives in separate enclaves. (The new Council is entirely Democratic.) And she has mixed feelings about that. “We get our information from different newspapers,” she said. “We live in different communities. We’re becoming not just polarized but isolated.”

Roberts echoed that over dinner at that tropical-themed restaurant with his fellow councilman Kors, 56, a lawyer and longtime gay rights advocate. “Isn’t our goal not to be separated out?” he said. He confessed to some worry that after the election, “The straight community might wake up and say, ‘Do we matter?’ ”

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Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI, is cooperating with Mueller – CNN
Fox guest blames Obama for Michael Flynn’s indictment on charges of lying to the FBI – Media Matters for America
Full text: Here is what Michael Flynn is pleading guilty to – USA TODAY

Is Mike Flynn Going to Nuke Jared? – Vanity Fair

Today’s Headlines and Commentary
The Early Edition: December 1, 2017
Group Of Republicans Warn Against Plans To Drill In Fragile Arctic Wildlife Refuge
Russian investigation reaches White House – theday.com
Donald Trump posts bizarre tweet after Michael Flynn finalizes plea deal against him
Michael Flynns Guilty Plea Pulls Vice President Pence Closer To Russia Spotlight
Robert Mueller expertly used Michael Flynn to lay a no-win trap for Jared Kushner
Rudy Giuliani – Google News: Is Rudy Giuliani Facing Serious Felony Charges in the Reza Zarrab Case? – Lombardi Letter
Is Rudy Giuliani Facing Serious Felony Charges in the Reza Zarrab Case? – Lombardi Letter
Putin Trump – Google News: Did Trump Ask Flynn To Befriend Russia? The President Has Been Praising Putin For Years – Newsweek
Masha Gessen: Trump and Putin ‘a new generation of monsters’ – Channel 4 News
The coming American explosion – Macleans.ca
After Michael Flynn deal is finalized, James Comey taunts Donald Trump religiously on Twitter
FBI trying to ‘get in front’ of future threats of Russian interference … – The Hill
Criminologists Are Asking Jeff Sessions To Release FBI Crime Data … – FiveThirtyEight
Flynn is front and center – and that’s bad news for Trump and his relatives – SFGate
Keeping America Secure in the New Age of Terror – Federal Bureau of Investigation (press release) (blog)
Air Force failed to report dozens of violent service members to FBI gun databases – The Keene Sentinel
FBI investigating people animated by ‘Antifa ideology’ – Washington Examiner
FBI, DHS Warn of Hacker Mercenaries Funded by Nation-States – Nextgov
Black Lawmakers Question FBI Director About ‘Black Identity Extremists’ Report – News One

 

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Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI, is cooperating with Mueller – CNN
 


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Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI, is cooperating with Mueller
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Washington (CNN) Former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn pleaded guilty Friday to lying to the FBI about conversations with Russia’s ambassador and disclosed that he is cooperating with the special counsel’s office. Flynn is the first
Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Lying to the FBINew York Times
Former national security adviser Mike Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBIUSA TODAY
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Fox guest blames Obama for Michael Flynn’s indictment on charges of lying to the FBI – Media Matters for America
 


Media Matters for America
Fox guest blames Obama for Michael Flynn’s indictment on charges of lying to the FBI
Media Matters for America
MATT SCHLAPP: I think what’s really important for people to know, which is, what ended up happening, what we’ve been reading about, is that the Obama administration was surveilling team Trump and unmasking on hundreds of occasions to see who these  

Full text: Here is what Michael Flynn is pleading guilty to – USA TODAY
 


USA TODAY
Full text: Here is what Michael Flynn is pleading guilty to
USA TODAY
Full text: Here is what Michael Flynn is pleading guilty to. USA TODAY Published 12:41 p.m. ET Dec. 1, 2017 | Updated 2:00 p.m. ET Dec. 1, 2017. XXX MIKE FLYNN IS HAVING A PLEA HEARING IN FEDERAL COURT_JMG_3573.JPG USA DC. President Trump’s former  

national security adviser Mike Flynn  

Is Mike Flynn Going to Nuke Jared? – Vanity Fair
 


Vanity Fair
Is Mike Flynn Going to Nuke Jared?
Vanity Fair
Is Mike Flynn’s cooperating going to turn Jared Kushner’s world upside down? Will Mitch McConnell’s tax plan screw everyone besides the filthy rich and donor class? And is Evan Spiegel’s latest pivot enough to sooth Wall Street’s erogenous fantasies  

Today’s Headlines and Commentary

Michael Flynn, the former national security adviser, pleaded guilty on Friday for lying to the FBI about his conversations with the Russian ambassador, the New York Times reported. Special Counsel Robert Muellers office charged Flynn with one count of making false statements to the FBI about two meetings with Sergei Kislyak in which Flynn and Kislyak discussed U.S. sanctions and a U.N. Security Council resolution. The charge is an indication that Flynn is cooperating with the special counsel investigation.EDITORS NOTE: This story is developing quickly and Lawfares coverage of current reporting is likely to be overtaken by events throughout the day.

Pope Francis said, the presence of God today is also called Rohingya, marking the first time the pope has used the term for Myanmars Muslim ethnic group during his visit to Southeast Asia, Reuters reported. The pope gave remarks after meeting Rohingya refugees in Dhaka, Bangladeshs capital. More than 600,000 Rohingya have fled Myanmar after a campaign of military that the U.N. has termed ethnic cleansing. The pope did not use the word Rohingya when he visited Myanmar earlier this week.

Saudi Arabias air force intercepted a ballistic missile launched from Yemen. The attack is the second this month, CNN reported. A Saudi military spokesperson said the missile was headed towards a Saudi city near the Yemen border. Houthi rebels in Yemen said the attack was a successful test. A missile fired at the Riyadh airport on Nov. 4 prompted the Saudi-led coalition fighting Houthi rebels in Yemen to blockade all the countrys ports. The U.N. sanctions monitor said on Wednesday that Iran had designed and manufactured those missiles, according to Reuters. The U.N. report said it did not have any evidence who supplied the missile to the Houthis. Iran has denied smuggling weapons in defiance of U.N. sanctions.

Reza Zarrab, the Turkish-Iranian businessman who plead guilty to evading U.S. sanctions, testified that Turkish government officials told him that Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan approved his scheme to illegally move millions of dollars of Iranian oil sales, the Washington Post reported. Zarrab is cooperating with federal prosecutors in the trial of one of his co-conspirators. The Turkish government has castigated the trial as a plot by Erdogans enemies to challenge his credibility.

Over the summer, President Trump pushed top Senate Republicans to close out congressional investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 election, the New York Times reported. The president told Sen. Richard Burr, the chairman of the Senate intelligence committee, that he was hopeful the inquiry would as quickly as possible. Trump angrily denounced the Russia investigation to other top lawmakers, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Sen. Bob Corker. The White House denied that the president had tried to improperly influence the investigation.

Erik Prince, founder of the security firm Blackwater, confirmed to congressional investigators that he secretly met a Russian banker close to President Vladimir Putin to discuss a U.S.-Russia communications channel, according to the Post. Prince confirmed that his counterpart at the previously reported meeting was Kirill Dimitriev, head of the Russian Direct Investment Fund. Prince denied that he was acting on behalf of the Trump campaign.

Attorney General Jeff Session refused to answer questions from congressional investigators in a closed hearing about whether Trump had ever attempted to interfere with the Justice Departments Russia investigation, Reuters reported. Rep. Adam Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the House intelligence committee, said Sessions declined to answer questions about President Trumps interactions with Sessions regarding the investigation.

The Defense Department disclosed that it has not yet provided a lawyer to the American citizen believed to be an Islamic State fighter being detained as an enemy combatant despite the mans request for counsel, the Times reported. Justice Department lawyers provided the information in response to an order from D.C. District Court Judge Tanya Chutkan in a habeas petition the ACLU brought on behalf of the man. The FBI has not questioned the man since he asked for a lawyer. The government has not charged the man with any crime and it is unclear whether it plans to transfer him to any other country for detention.

Israel bombed targets in Gaza in response to mortar fire from Palestinian militants, the Post reported. The Israeli military said it hit Hamas military sites. The mortar fire came after Israel destroyed a tunnel that the Islamic Jihad militant organization had built under the Israel-Gaza border.

The White House is considering a plan to relocate the U.S. embassy in Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, the Wall Street Journal reported. The move would also involve formally recognizing Jerusalem as Israels capital. The plan is not yet official, but it could spark strident opposition from Palestinians and cause complications with the Israel-Palestine peace process. On Friday, the president will face a deadline on whether to issue a waiver that would allow the U.S. to keep its embassy in Tel Aviv, delaying provisions of the 1995 Jerusalem Embassy Act from taking effect.

The U.S. will withdraw 400 Marines from Syria ahead of schedule after the U.S.-backed campaign against the Islamic State achieved large reductions in the groups territory, the Journal reported. The Marine unit provided artillery support to the U.S.-backed forces that captured Raqqa, the Islamic States former capital, last month. A coalition spokesperson said the move was part of a larger reduction in military commitments as the campaign winds down.

The Syrian governments negotiators left U.N. peace talks in Geneva and said they may not return, Reuters reported. The Syrian representatives said the oppositions collective statement that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad cannot play a role in the countrys political transition made negotiations impossible. The government team said they would consult with political leadership in Damascus on whether to return to the table next week.

Nigers government gave its approval for armed U.S. drone flights over its territory, the Times reported. The U.S. and Niger signed a memorandum of understanding allowing armed drone flights out of Niamey, the capital, and an expanded military presence in the country. The U.S. is targeting extremist groups across West Africa. Deploying drones in Niger would significantly enlarge the range U.S. drones can cover over West Africa.

Taliban gunmen disguised in burqas attacked a university dormitory in Peshawar, Pakistan, the Times reported. Gunfire killed at least nine people and wounded thirty others. The Pakistani Taliban said its militants had attacked a Pakistani intelligence safe house. Pakistani authorities said there was no intelligence activity at the university.

The Pentagon delayed indefinitely a planned phase-out of certain types of cluster munitions, according to the AP. The Department of Defense said it was unable to fulfill a pledge by President George W. Bush to use cluster munitions that have high safety standards by 2019 and would continue to use its existing stockpile. The U.S. has not signed the 2010 treaty banning the use of cluster bombs.

 

ICYMI: Yesterday on Lawfare

Hayley Evans and Shannon Togawa Mercer discussed Brexits implications for data protection regulations.

Evans summarized the UKs new data protection bill.

Madiha Afzal explained why the Trumps administrations strategy in Pakistan is likely doomed to failure.

Curtis Bradley and Jack Goldsmith discussed whether Congress cares that the president has an enormous amount of discretion to interpret international law.

Goldsmith and Robert Williams argued that the recent indictment of three Chinese hackers shows the 2015 U.S.-China cybersecurity agreement is weakening.

Scott Anderson and Yishai Schwartz explained the potential consequences if the president waives the Jerusalem Embassy Act.

Benjamin Wittes posted the Power of Delusion Thinking edition of Rational Security.

Susan Hennessey shared her testimony from a congressional hearing on the cybersecurity of voting machines.

 

Email the Roundup Team noteworthy law and security-related articles to include, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook for additional commentary on these issues. Sign up to receive Lawfare in your inbox. Visit our Events Calendar to learn about upcoming national security events, and check out relevant job openings on our Job Board.

The Early Edition: December 1, 2017
 

Before the start of business, Just Security provides a curated summary of up-to-the-minute developments at home and abroad. Heres todays news.

The TRUMP ADMINISTRATION

A plan to replace Secretary of State Rex Tillerson with C.I.A. Director Mike Pompeo has been devised by the White House, senior administration officials said yesterday, with Pompeo to be replaced by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) who has signaled an intention to accept the role of C.I.A. Director if offered however officials have said that Trump has not yet signed off on the plan which was devised by White House chief of staff John F. Kelly. Peter Baker, Maggie Haberman and Gardiner Harris report at the New York Times.

Hes here Rex is here, Trump said yesterday in response to a question about Tillerson and whether he wants him to remain as secretary of state, Trumps comments did not quell rumors about Tillersons departure and there have been numerous reports that the president has a poor relationship with the secretary of state. Michael C. Bender and Peter Nicholas report at the Wall Street Journal.

He remains, as I have been told, committed to doing this job, the State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said yesterday, making the statement as part of a series of comments by administration officials that tried to downplay the rumors of Tillersons departure, separately Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) told reporters that he had spoken to Tillerson in a lengthy conversation and did not believe he was soon to be sacked. Anne Gearan and Carol Morello report at the Washington Post.

Kelly called the State Department to tell them that the rumors about a plan to oust Tillerson are not true, Nauert said yesterday, the BBC reports.

Nauert pointed out that Tillerson will be going on a tour of Europe next week and had a full week of engagements when asked about the secretary of states position, in response to a question about Tillersons authority and whether it has been undermined, Nauert responded that Tillerson is someone whose feathers dont get ruffled very easily. Julian Borger and David Smith report at the Guardian.

Theres nothing to it, the Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said yesterday in response to reports of Tillersons imminent departure. Ellen Mitchell reports at the Hill.

The reports of Tillersons departure were disclosed as part of an attempt by the White House to publicly shame the secretary of state, according to a source familiar with the matter, adding that the shaming would be followed by waiting for Tillerson to punch out. Michelle Kosinski and Sara Murray report at CNN.

Several senior administration officials claimed that there would be further departures of senior White House aides and Cabinet members as Trump reaches his one-year anniversary in office, the White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said yesterday that there are no personnel announcements at this time.  Michael C. Bender reports at the Wall Street Journal.

Diplomats frustrated with Tillersons leadership of the State Department have cautiously welcomed the prospect of Pompeos appointment, saying that despite his partisan persuasion, they hope that a better relationship with the president would be to the benefit of the department. Nahal Toosi explains at POLITICO.

Pompeo has certain qualities that Tillerson does not possess, however he would be still faced with similar problems regarding the presidents lack of regard for diplomacy and the reports of Pompeos potential appointment has drawn a mixed reaction from serving U.S. officials. Arshad Mohammed explains at Reuters.

Pompeo would bring a distinctly political voice to the role of secretary of state, having shown an ideological and politicized approach as C.I.A. director which has aligned with the presidents views on many issues, this would bring the benefit of a better relationship with the president, but would remove a voice of moderation on key foreign policy issues. Mark Landler writes at the New York Times.

Tillerson is arguably unsuited to his role and has presided over a chaotic and demoralizing period at the State Department, however if the personnel changes take place, it would potentially provide Trump with two more loyal lieutenants as Pompeo has been pointedly hawkish on key issues, such as on the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, and Cotton is perhaps the hardest-line hawk in the Senate. Ishaan Tharoor provides an analysis at the Washington Post.

The appointment of Cotton as C.I.A. Director would cement his meteoric rise in Republican politics, which has been achieved through an attempt to co-opt and shape the president rather than rail against him. Eliana Johnson and Ali Watkins observe at POLITICO.

Intelligence professionals have questioned Cottons credentials and have expressed objection to his characterization of waterboarding and torture, Spencer Ackerman explains at The Daily Beast.

Changes in personnel would likely be seen as a signal of greater U.S. willingness to use force, it remains unclear whether bringing in Pompeo and Cotton would lead to substantive policy changes, nevertheless Pyongyang and Tehran should understand that Washington is recalculating its tolerance for risk. David Ignatius writes at the Washington Post.

NORTH KOREA

The Chinese Envoy, who just returned from North Korea, seems to have had no impact on Little Rocket Man, Trump tweeted yesterday, referring to a recent visit by Chinese President Xi Jinpings special envoy to Pyongyang and North Koreas launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile (I.C.B.M.) on Wednesday. Ashley Parker reports at the Washington Post.

The U.S.s announcement last week of joint military drills with South Korea provoked North Korean leader Kim Jong-un to take rash action, the Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov claimed yesterday, accusing the U.S. of escalating tensions and calling for the U.S. to first of all explain to us what they are trying to achieve. Nathan Hodge reports at the Wall Street Journal.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson yesterday praised China for doing a lot but said they could do more to restrain the trade of oil with North Korea, Makini Brice and Andrew Osborn reporting at Reuters.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said yesterday that the U.S. would be unrelenting in its pursuit of diplomacy, adding that our diplomats will speak from a position of strength because we do have military options. Reuters reporting.

TRUMP-RUSSIA

Trump urged Senate Republicans to try and conclude the Senate Intelligence Committees investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, according to several lawmakers and aides, including the Chairman of the committee Richard Burr (R-N.C.). The former Chairwoman of the committee Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) said that Trumps requests were inappropriate and breached the separation of powers, Jonathan Martin, Maggie Haberman and Alexander Burns report at the New York Times.

During testimony to the House Intelligence Committee, the Trump associate and founder of private military company Blackwater, Erik Prince, confirmed that he had met with a member of Russian President Vladimir Putins inner circle in the Seychelles in a secret Jan. 11 meeting. The meeting was brokered by the U.A.E. as part of an apparent attempt to set up backchannel communications between Trump and Russia, according to sources familiar with the interview, however Prince denied that he was representing the Trump transition team during the meeting, Karoun Demirjian reporting at the Washington Post.

A transcript of Princes interview is expected to be made public within the next three days, Katie Bo Williams reports at the Hill.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions was evasive when testifying before the House Intelligence Committee in a closed hearing yesterday, according to Democratic lawmakers who attended, the ranking Democrat Rep. Adam Schiff (Calif.) said that he was troubled by Sessions refusal to answer critical questions relating to the Russia investigation. Patricia Zengerle and Sarah N. Lynch report at Reuters.

The opposition research firm Fusion G.P.S. would not run afoul of the First Amendment by revealing more of its clients and vendors, U.S. District Court Judge Richard Leon suggested yesterday, the firm commissioned the former British Intelligence officer Christopher Steele to compile a controversial dossier that alleged links between Trump and Russia. Josh Gerstein reports at POLITICO.

Trumps former campaign chairman Paul Manafort reached a bail deal with prosecutors yesterday, Manafort and his co-defendant Rick Gates have had their movement restricted since special counsel Robert Mueller charged them as part of his investigation into Russian interference in the election. Spencer Hsu reports at the Washington Post.

ISRAEL-PALESTINE

A plan to formally recognize Jerusalem as Israels capital and to move the U.S. Embassy to the city has been considered by the Trump administration, according to U.S. officials, such a move would likely provoke a strong reaction from Palestinians and potentially undermine peace negotiations. When asked about moving the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv, a White House spokesperson said that the president has always said it is a matter of when, not if, Felicia Schwartz, Andrew Ackerman and Rory Jones report at the Wall Street Journal.

This is a premature report, the White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in response to rumors of the planned U.S. Embassy move, Andrew Restuccia and Eliana Johnson reporting at POLITICO.

An Israeli soldier was stabbed to death in southern Israel yesterday, hours after Israeli forces struck the Gaza Strip in retaliation for mortar fire. Ilan Ben Zion reports at the Financial Times.

The two sides in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict should focus on incremental changes rather than a comprehensive solution, and the plan to for the division of the Jerusalem municipal area is a good place to begin. Peter Berkowitz writes at the Wall Street Journal.

YEMEN

Saudi Arabia intercepted a Houthi rebel missile fired toward the country from Yemen, the Saudi military said today, marking the second launch by the Houthi rebels in Yemen after they fired a ballistic missile on Nov. 4. Jamie Tarabay reports at CNN.   

The Houthi ballistic missiles that were fired into Saudi Arabia this year appear to have been designed and manufactured by Iran, according to a confidential report by U.N. sanctions monitors to the Security Council on Nov. 24, the revelation likely strengthening the Trump administrations attempts to punish Iran. Michelle Nichols reports at Reuters.

The Saudi-led coalition must fully wind down its blockade on Yemen to avoid an atrocious humanitarian tragedy, the U.N. humanitarian chief Mark Lowcock said today, Tom Miles reporting at Reuters.

SYRIA

The U.S. is set to pull 400 Marines out of Syria following their successful support of coalition forces and the Syrian Democratic Forces (S.D.F.) in their operation to take the Islamic State-held city of Raqqa, the U.S. Central Command said in a statement yesterday.

Were not saying its not needed anymore but were saying its not needed in the volume weve had it, the spokesperson for the U.S.-led coalition Col. Ryan Dillon said yesterday in relation to troop deployments in Syria and the withdrawal of the Marines. Ben Kesling reporting at the Wall Street Journal.

The U.N.-backed peace talks on Syria have been extended until mid-December, the U.N. special envoy to Syria Staffan de Mistura said yesterday, emphasizing that the talks should have no preconditions. The U.N. News Centre reports.

U.S.-led airstrikes continue. U.S. and coalition forces carried out 11 airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Syria and Iraq between November 24 and November 26. [Central Command]

U.S.-U.K. RELATIONS

The fact that we work together does not mean that we are afraid to say we think the United States has got it wrong, the British Prime Minister Theresa May said yesterday, responding to Trumps sharing of content from the far-right, anti-Islam political group Britain First on his Twitter account. Jason Douglas and Jenny Gross report at the Wall Street Journal, noting the impact the presidents actions have had on the special relationship.

Trumps visit is unlikely to be officially canceled, despite the outrage across the political spectrum in the U.K. at Trumps actions, Amanda Erickson explains at the Washington Post.

The British government were within their rights to tell the U.S. President to butt out, and Trump should be aware that the U.K. remains the indispensable ally to the U.S. in the political and economic affairs of the world, the Wall Street Journal editorial board writes.

The U.K. should rescind its invitation to Trump for a state visit, Matthew DAncona writes at the New York Times.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

The U.S. Defense Department was granted permission by the government of Niger to deploy armed drones from its capital, Pentagon officials said yesterday, the agreement was made through a memorandum of understanding and drone operations could begin within days. Helene Cooper and Eric Schmitt report at the New York Times.

Taliban militants in Pakistan killed at least nine people and wounded at least 30 in an attack in the city of Peshawar today, according to officials, Ismail Khan reporting at the New York Times.

The American citizen who apparently fought for the Islamic State group in Iraq and was captured by the U.S. in mid-September has been informed of his right to counsel, however the Department of Justice said yesterday that due to his current situation, it was unknown when he would be able to have an attorney. Katie Bo Williams reports at the Hill.

Members of the Taliban in Afghanistan have defected to Islamic State group in the northern Jawzjan province, providing the Islamic State with a new foothold which has drawn the attention of U.S. forces. Matin Sahak and Girish Gupta report at Reuters.

The Defense Department has indefinitely postponed a planned policy banning the use of certain cluster bombs by 2019, the Pentagon spokesperson Tom Crossen saying in a statement yesterday that cluster munitions remain a vital military capability. Ellen Mitchell reports at the Hill.

A package of secret proposals that would allow for private companies to run covert operations and rendition programs has been considered by the White House and the C.I.A., Aram Roston reveals at BuzzFeed News.

The Libyan Prime Minister Fayez el-Sarraj yesterday expressed hope that the U.N.-imposed arms embargo would be partially lifted, making the comments ahead of a meeting with Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and a meeting today with President Trump. Reuters reports.

The Iranian-Turkish businessman Reza Zarrab claimed that the Turkish President Reçep Tayyip Erdoğan personally intervened in a scheme allowing Iran to avoid U.S. and U.N. sanctions, Zarrab said in court testimony in New York yesterday. Jose Pagliery reports at CNN.

Trump has not nominated a single member to work on the Presidents Intelligence Advisory Board which reviews the intelligence community, demonstrating the presidents ambivalence toward the intelligence community, Jenna McLaughlin writes at Foreign Policy.

The Trump administration and Saudi Arabias goal to curb Irans influence in the Middle East has been undermined by a lack of commonality on key issues, particularly how far they are willing to risk a civil war in Lebanon to clamp down on the Iran-backed Lebanese Shiite Hezbollah group. Yaroslav Trofimov writes at the Wall Street Journal.

Read on Just Security »

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Russian investigation reaches White House – theday.com
 

Russian investigation reaches White House
theday.com
According to court documents, Manafort sought to hide the millions he received for working to elect pro-Russian candidateViktor F. Yanukovych as Ukraine’s president. Also arrested on related charges was Manafort associate Rick Gates. Most significant and more »

Donald Trump posts bizarre tweet after Michael Flynn finalizes plea deal against him

Now that Donald Trump has officially been sold out by his former National Security Adviser and former close personal ally Michael Flynn, we’ve all been waiting to see Trump’s reaction. Would he begin tweeting maniacally about Flynn? Would he yell “fake news” at the plea deal story and insist that Flynn somehow hasn’t sold him out? Would he randomly attack yet another famous black athlete to try to create a distraction? None of the above. He’s finally tweeted something, and it’s just… bizarre.Here’s what Trump tweeted in the hours after the Michael Flynn news: “The media has been speculating that I fired Rex Tillerson or that he would be leaving soon – FAKE NEWS! Hes not leaving and while we disagree on certain subjects, (I call the final shots) we work well together and America is highly respected again!” Wait, what? Trump’s closest adviser just sold him out, his presidency just went up in a ball of flames, and he’s probably headed to prison in the end, and yet he’s tweeting about his personal feud with Tillerson instead? Is he that far gone? Actually, no, there’s something else going on here, because Trump didn’t write that tweet.

Trump’s tweet includes a link to an Instagram photo of himself and Rex Tillerson during better times. We’ve already seen that Trump’s technical skills are so pedestrian he would have absolutely no idea how to link an Instagram photo to a tweet, and in fact he would have no idea what that even means. In other words, Trump didn’t post this tweet. In the instances where one of his handlers posts a tweet on his behalf, it usually turns out that the words weren’t Trump’s to begin with, and that he had nothing to do with it.

So who’s ghost-tweeting on Donald Trump’s behalf today? Our best guess is Dan Scavino, Trump’s Director of Social Media, who retweeted Trump’s tweet from his own account immediately after it was posted. In any case, here’s the real upshot: Trump isn’t tweeting anything today. His handlers clearly believe that a distraction is necessary, so they’re posting nonsense about the Tillerson feud. But Trump doesn’t appear to be involved at all. Instead it’s more likely he’s curled up in a ball under his desk, unable to function. He’ll tweet about Flynn eventually, but for the moment, he appears to be so far gone that even his staffers are trying to cover for him.

The post Donald Trump posts bizarre tweet after Michael Flynn finalizes plea deal against him appeared first on Palmer Report.

Michael Flynns Guilty Plea Pulls Vice President Pence Closer To Russia Spotlight

Pence has tried to distance himself, but hes supposedly the reason Trumps national security adviser got fired.
Robert Mueller expertly used Michael Flynn to lay a no-win trap for Jared Kushner

Two days ago we learned that Special Counsel Robert Mueller recently met with Jared Kushner to discuss Michael Flynn’s role in the Trump-Russia scandal. It stood out as bizarre, considering that we had already learned Mueller was in the process of cutting a deal with Flynn, meaning that Mueller wouldn’t need any more testimony against Flynn. This morning Flynn did indeed cut that deal. Now that the details are leaking out, it’s become clear why Mueller went back and met with Kushner: it was a trap.Flynn has testified that while he was illegally communicating with the Russian Ambassador about sanctions on December 29th, he was relaying those conversations in real time to Jared Kushner at Mar-a-Lago (link). In other words, Flynn just sent Kushner up the river by pegging him as the ringleader of the Trump-Russia conspiracy. Of course Flynn will have to provide evidence of this beyond merely his own word, but Mueller has given him a sweetheart deal, suggesting that Flynn does indeed have overwhelming evidence. The key here, however, is Mueller’s last minute meeting with Kushner.

Based on the timeline as we now know it, Mueller went back and met with Kushner after Flynn had begun negotiating a deal, but before word of that deal became public. In other words, Kushner didn’t know at the time that Flynn had already ratted him out. Mueller met with Kushner in order to lay a perjury trap by asking him about the events that Flynn had already spelled out.

We don’t yet know whether Jared Kushner fell into that perjury trap, or if he told Robert Mueller the truth. But either way he’s facing trouble. If he admitted to being Flynn’s point man for the Russian sanctions conspiracy, then he just confessed to a serious crime. And if he lied about it, then Mueller has him nailed for lying to a federal investigator, which is an imprisonable felony. If Flynn’s evidence against Kushner is as good as Mueller seems to think it is, then Kushner is screwed one way or the other.

The post Robert Mueller expertly used Michael Flynn to lay a no-win trap for Jared Kushner appeared first on Palmer Report.

Rudy Giuliani – Google News: Is Rudy Giuliani Facing Serious Felony Charges in the Reza Zarrab Case? – Lombardi Letter
 

Is Rudy Giuliani Facing Serious Felony Charges in the Reza Zarrab Case?
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Rudy Giuliani is famous for being the former mayor of New York City during the terrorist attacks in 2001. He helped the city get back on its feet and made the city even stronger than before. For those efforts, he deserves a ton of respect. Nevertheless 

 Rudy Giuliani – Google News

Is Rudy Giuliani Facing Serious Felony Charges in the Reza Zarrab Case? – Lombardi Letter
 

Is Rudy Giuliani Facing Serious Felony Charges in the Reza Zarrab Case?
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Putin Trump – Google News: Did Trump Ask Flynn To Befriend Russia? The President Has Been Praising Putin For Years – Newsweek
 


Newsweek
Did Trump Ask Flynn To Befriend Russia? The President Has Been Praising Putin For Years
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Masha Gessen: Trump and Putin ‘a new generation of monsters’ – Channel 4 News
 


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Masha Gessen: Trump and Putin ‘a new generation of monsters’. Krishnan Guru-Murthy Presenter. Donald Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn has admitted lying to the FBI about his contacts with Russian officials during the transition and more »

The coming American explosion – Macleans.ca
 


Macleans.ca
The coming American explosion
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In the process, a fuse has been lit that may lead to the most significant political explosion in American history. We have been expecting this moment for a long time. One of the peculiar things about the Russia scandal is that at the beginning it 
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After Michael Flynn deal is finalized, James Comey taunts Donald Trump religiously on Twitter

Donald Trump’s former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn officially sold him out this morning, cutting a plea deal and testifying that Trump ordered him to secretly communicate with the Russian government during the election. In the wake of the news, former FBI Director James Comey who was fired by Trump for trying to investigate the Russia scandal took the opportunity to religiously taunt Trump on Twitter. Literally.Comey used his Twitter account around noontime to quote the Bible of all things, focusing in on Amos 5:24: “But justice roll down like waters and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream.” This comes just two days after Comey quoted Winston Churchill by tweeting “The truth is incontrovertible. Malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is.” So what’s Comey trying to tell us?

First, he clearly feels vindicated for having pursued the Trump-Russia scandal so vigorously for so long. Now that Trump is being proven guilty of having conspired with Russia during the election, this also proves that Trump obstructed justice when he fired Comey, meaning that the firing was unjustified and should not have happened. Many will say that James Comey got what he deserved, after he misled the public eleven days before the election by releasing a letter which falsely implied Hillary Clinton was newly under investigation for her emails, when that was not the case.

James Comey and the FBI also spent the election trying to keep their Trump-Russia investigation a secret in order to preserve the sanctity of the case, which led voters to go into election day under the mistaken impression that Clinton was the criminal instead of Trump. Comey’s legacy will end up being a mixed one at best. But on this day, he clearly feels justified and vindicated or perhaps he’s just really excited to see Trump going down.

The post After Michael Flynn deal is finalized, James Comey taunts Donald Trump religiously on Twitterappeared first on Palmer Report.

FBI trying to ‘get in front’ of future threats of Russian interference … – The Hill
 


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Criminologists Are Asking Jeff Sessions To Release FBI Crime Data … – FiveThirtyEight
 


FiveThirtyEight
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Good morning Chairman McCaul, Ranking Member Thompson, and members of the committee. Thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the current threats to the homeland. Our nation continues to face a multitude of serious and  

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2:53 PM 12/1/2017 – Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to the FBI – Washington Post

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Coming in December on FRONTLINE – FRONTLINE
Who is Michael Flynn? – CNN
calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News: Who is Michael Flynn? – CNN
Kushner Is Said to Have Ordered Flynn to Contact Russia – Bloomberg
organized crime and intelligence – Google News: Flynn Pleads Guilty: Is He Singing on Trump-Russia? – The Nation.
Felix Sater – Google News: Flynn Pleads Guilty: Is He Singing on Trump-Russia? – The Nation.
Donald Trump | The Guardian: Were other Trump aides lobbying for Israel illicitly alongside Michael Flynn?
Trumpism – Google News: Jerry Earl Johnston: Is Trumpism the latest religious sect? – Deseret News
Under Pressure, Turkey’s President Slams Testimony at Sanctions Trial – Voice of America
Palmer Report: Major newspaper declares Donald Trump a madman
Russian Intelligence services and international organized crime and terrorism – Google News: Michael Flynn’s rise was rapid, his fall even faster – PBS NewsHour
donald trump russia – Google News: Donald Trump’s situation just became much, much worse now Michael Flynn is cooperating with Mueller’s Russia probe – The Independent
The Latest: Dems warn Trump not to interfere in probes – The Mercury News
Erdogan Allowed Turkish Banks to Help Iran Make Illegal Payments, Witness Says — 2nd Update – Fox Business
Cambridge Analytica Social Media Posts in Trump and Brexit campaigns – Google News: The Tech Giants Must Be Reined In – The American Interest
Our Democracy Depends on Secure Elections – WIRED
Michael Flynn charged in Russia investigation: What to know – Fox News

 

Saved Stories – None
Donald Trump is Putin’s Trojan Horse – Seacoastonline.com
 

Donald Trump is Putin’s Trojan Horse
Seacoastonline.com
We all have heard the story of the Trojan Horse, when the Greeks during the Trojan war, used a huge horse filled with soldiers as a subterfuge to take the City of Troy. Every day it is becoming clearer and clearer that Vladimir Putin used his own  

social media in trump campaign – Google News: Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to the FBI – Washington Post
 


The Daily Herald
Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to the FBI
Washington Post
Flynn’s admission to the charge Friday in federal district court in D.C. is an ominous sign for the White House, as court documents indicate Flynn is cooperating in the ongoing probe of possible coordination between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin 
Flynn Admits to Lying, Says Trump Team Knew of Russia TalksBloomberg
Former Trump adviser Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBIThe Daily Herald
Reactions To Michael Flynn’s Claims That Trump Directed Him To Contact The Russians Show People Aren’t SurprisedRomper
The Sydney Morning Herald
all 678 news articles »

 social media in trump campaign – Google News

US attorney general Sessions evasive on Russia probe: congressmen – Reuters
 


Reuters
US attorney general Sessions evasive on Russia probe: congressmen
Reuters
The panel is among several congressional committees, along with the Justice Department’s special counsel Robert Mueller,investigating allegations that Russia sought to influence the U.S. election and potential collusion by Trump’s campaign. Moscow has and more »

Russian propaganda on social media – Google News: Stalin calendar pulled from sale in Russia – euronews
 


euronews
Stalin calendar pulled from sale in Russia
euronews
“Everything that happened at that time was a savage, savage horror,” was the opinion of a man old enough to remember. The calendar, at just under eight dollars or 450 rubles, sparked an intensive discussion on social media. “Is it already sold out and more »

 Russian propaganda on social media – Google News

The Note: Reality show redux? Trump’s new normal isn’t normal – ABC News
 

The Note: Reality show redux? Trump’s new normal isn’t normal
ABC News
It’s crunch time for the Republican tax reform bill and President Trump and congressional Republicans and Democrats know it. Republicans got a procedural victory Wednesday when the Senate voted to proceed to debate on the bill. But they are stilland more »

Justice Department is expected to release Mueller expenses next week – CNN
 


CNN
Justice Department is expected to release Mueller expenses next week
CNN
DOJ is preparing to release the first expense report connected to Mueller’s probe next week, according to Justice Department spokeswoman Sarah Isgur Flores. The report will be made public and will also be provided to Congress, she said. While the  

How Much Has Mueller’s Trump-Russia Investigation Cost? – Newsweek
 


Newsweek
How Much Has Mueller’s Trump-Russia Investigation Cost?
Newsweek
Since his appointment almost seven months ago, Special Counsel Robert Mueller and his crack team have racked up a $5 million tab as they probe Russia’s meddling in last year’s presidential election and alleged collusion with Donald Trump’s campaign to 
Ex-Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn charged in Robert Mueller’s Russia investigationNew York Daily News
Special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation tops $5 millionABC News
Michael Flynn pleads guilty to false-statements charge in Russia probeFox News
Business Insider –HuffPost
all 1,870 news articles »
putin won US 2016 election – Google News: Coming in December on FRONTLINE – FRONTLINE
 


FRONTLINE
Coming in December on FRONTLINE
FRONTLINE
With revelations involving Russia’s role in the 2016 presidential election continuing to command the headlines, FRONTLINE will close out the year with an encore presentation of Putin’s Revenge our two-part investigation into how Vladimir Putin came 

 putin won US 2016 election – Google News

Coming in December on FRONTLINE – FRONTLINE
 


FRONTLINE
Coming in December on FRONTLINE
FRONTLINE
Just this morning, Michael Flynn, President Trump’s former national security adviser, pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about conversations with former Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak, the latest charge in special counsel Robert Mueller’s  

Who is Michael Flynn? – CNN
 


CNN
Who is Michael Flynn?
CNN
Flynn was forced to resign after less than a month after he misled Vice President Mike Pence and then-chief of staff Reince Priebus about his conversations with then-Russian Ambassador to the US Sergey Kislyak. Flynn had told them — and the public and more »

calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News: Who is Michael Flynn? – CNN
 


CNN
Who is Michael Flynn?
CNN
Flynn was forced to resign after less than a month after he misled Vice President Mike Pence and then-chief of staff Reince Priebus about his conversations with then-Russian Ambassador to the US Sergey Kislyak. Flynn had told them — and the public 
Key players in the Michael Flynn investigationKTAR.comall 2 news articles »

 calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News

Kushner Is Said to Have Ordered Flynn to Contact Russia – Bloomberg
 


Bloomberg
Kushner Is Said to Have Ordered Flynn to Contact Russia
Bloomberg
This was the context of Kushner’s instruction to Flynn last December. One transition official at the time said Kushner called Flynn to tell him he needed to get every foreign minister or ambassador from a country on the U.N. Security Council to delay 
Donald Trump, Jared Kushner Could Be Next After Michael Flynn Charged by Mueller With Lying to the FBINewsweekall 951 news articles »

organized crime and intelligence – Google News: Flynn Pleads Guilty: Is He Singing on Trump-Russia? – The Nation.
 


The Nation.
Flynn Pleads Guilty: Is He Singing on Trump-Russia?
The Nation.
Just as the FBI does in any routine organizedcrime takedown, Mueller is quietly going after each and every potential participant, starting from the bottom and moving to the top. And in that hierarchy, one of the people who could potentially do the 
The four people charged so far in Russia investigationUSA TODAYall 805 news articles »

 organized crime and intelligence – Google News

Felix Sater – Google News: Flynn Pleads Guilty: Is He Singing on Trump-Russia? – The Nation.
 


The Nation.
Flynn Pleads Guilty: Is He Singing on Trump-Russia?
The Nation.
Third, Flynn could say what he might know about an odd, seemingly Russia-friendly back-channel peace plan for Ukraine that was cooked up among Michael Cohen, Trump’s personal lawyer, a Trump-linked wheeler-dealer named Felix Sater, and a Ukrainian and more »

 Felix Sater – Google News

Donald Trump | The Guardian: Were other Trump aides lobbying for Israel illicitly alongside Michael Flynn?

The ex-national security adviser has admitted trying to get Russia to block a critical UN resolution and an Israeli official stated they sought Trumps helpThe guilty plea entered on Friday by Donald Trumps former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, has raised critical new questions not only about the relationship between the Trump team and Russian officials but also whether Flynn and other members of the Trump transition team were improperly lobbying on behalf of Israel.

Related: Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI as Trump-Russia inquiry takes critical step

Michael Flynn is the fourth Donald Trump aide to face criminal charges in the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 US election and any alleged collusion.

Continue reading…

 Donald Trump | The Guardian

Trumpism – Google News: Jerry Earl Johnston: Is Trumpism the latest religious sect? – Deseret News
 


Deseret News
Jerry Earl Johnston: Is Trumpism the latest religious sect?
Deseret News
Religion, like sports, produces stars. Many stars flash and fade. Others have legs, as they say. Their influence expands. Reza Aslan is a religious writer looking to last. And he’s off to a solid start. Aslan’s book Zealot (Random House, 2013  

 Trumpism – Google News

Under Pressure, Turkey’s President Slams Testimony at Sanctions Trial – Voice of America
 


Voice of America
Under Pressure, Turkey’s President Slams Testimony at Sanctions Trial
Voice of America
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is reacting angrily after testimony in a New York trial implicated him in an alleged multi-million-dollar scam to evade U.S.-imposed sanctions against Iran. His reaction is adding to concerns Ankara is on a 
Turkey PM hopes trader backtracks on sanctions testimony ‘mistake’Digital Journalall 60 news articles »

Palmer Report: Major newspaper declares Donald Trump a madman

We’ve all watched Donald Trump go completely berserk this past week, even by his already-demented standards, in the wake of the news that Michael Flynn has decided to cut a plea deal against him. Trump has publicly attacked the Prime Minister of Great Britain. He’s falsely accused MSNBC morning host Joe Scarborough of having murdered a woman. Now the editorial board of a major newspaper is flatly declaring that Trump is a “madman.”The New York Daily News, a major newspaper from Donald Trump’s hometown, has run an op-ed titled “Donald Trump is a madman: The President’s Wednesday Twitter spasm confirms what many Americans have long suspected.” It has no single author listed, which means that it’s a joint statement from the entire editorial board. It’s nothing short of devastating.

Here’s a sampling of what the NYDN is dishing out in Trump’s direction: “Some might say we are just suffering through the umpteenth canny, calculated presidential eruption designed to distract the nation from special counsel Robert Muellers investigation, or perhaps from unpopular legislation working its way through Congress. Quite possible. But Occams razor, and the sheer strangeness of Trumps behavior, leads us to conclude that we are witnessing signs of mania.” And that’s just the start of the takedown.

It’s unclear the extent to which Donald Trump is purposely trying to create demented distractions to steer media coverage away from Michael Flynn’s plea deal, and the extent to which Trump is simply losing control of what little psychological faculties he may have ever had to begin with. In any case, the net result is the kind of behavior which has set off a whole new level of alarm. The New York Times has published a letter from a psychologist who believes Trump is too mentally unbalanced to be in possession of even personal weapons, let alone nuclear weapons. You can read the New York Daily News “madman” takedown here.

The post Major newspaper declares Donald Trump a “madman” appeared first on Palmer Report.

 Palmer Report

Russian Intelligence services and international organized crime and terrorism – Google News: Michael Flynn’s rise was rapid, his fall even faster – PBS NewsHour
 


PBS NewsHour
Michael Flynn’s rise was rapid, his fall even faster
PBS NewsHour
WASHINGTON Michael Flynn was President Donald Trump’s favorite general, rapidly vaulted to prominence by his fiery speech at the 2016 Republican National Convention and Trump’s decision to reward him with a plum job as his top national security aide and more »

 Russian Intelligence services and international organized crime and terrorism – Google News

donald trump russia – Google News: Donald Trump’s situation just became much, much worse now Michael Flynn is cooperating with Mueller’s Russia probe – The Independent
 


The Independent
Donald Trump’s situation just became much, much worse now Michael Flynn is cooperating with Mueller’sRussia probe
The Independent
There is an old adage among criminal investigators that when you’re investigating something potentially huge, you don’t go for the biggest target first. Rather you work your way slowly and methodically, looking to peel away layers and trying to build 
TrumpRussia: Michael Flynn admits lying to FBIBBC News
Flynn to testify that Trump directed him to make contact with Russians: ReportsCNBC
Michael Flynn’s guilty plea is an absolutely massive problem for Donald TrumpCNN
Telegraph.co.uk –The Guardian –Reuters
all 1,786 news articles »

 donald trump russia – Google News

The Latest: Dems warn Trump not to interfere in probes – The Mercury News
 


The Mercury News
The Latest: Dems warn Trump not to interfere in probes
The Mercury News
FILE In this Feb. 1, 2017 file photo, then-National Security Adviser Michael Flynn speaks during the daily news briefing at the White House, in Washington. The few public signs emanating from special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation 
Michael Flynn charged in Russia investigation: What to knowFox News
The four people charged so far in Russia investigationUSA TODAY
Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI, is cooperating with MuellerCNN
FiveThirtyEight –NBCNews.com –The Hill
all 1,812 news articles »
Erdogan Allowed Turkish Banks to Help Iran Make Illegal Payments, Witness Says — 2nd Update – Fox Business
 


Financial Times
Erdogan Allowed Turkish Banks to Help Iran Make Illegal Payments, Witness Says — 2nd Update
Fox Business
Mr. Zarrab, 34 years old, had been a defendant in the case until he pleaded guilty to seven charges, including sanctions evasion and money laundering, and agreed to testify at trial against Mr. Atilla. The gold trader became a household name in Turkey 
Gold trader tells US court he bribed former Turkish officialFinancial Times
Turkey: trial of banker is plot schemed by US-based clericFox News
Turkish-Iranian gold trader testifies at US trialBoston Herald
Hurriyet Daily News –The Guardian –Middle East Eye
all 193 news articles »
Cambridge Analytica Social Media Posts in Trump and Brexit campaigns – Google News: The Tech Giants Must Be Reined In – The American Interest
 


The American Interest
The Tech Giants Must Be Reined In
The American Interest
But this is only the tip of the iceberg in terms of the kind of meddling the social media giants tolerated. And getting a grip on how to address these issues will be no small feat. The social media business model itself is flawed and unethical; the and more »

 Cambridge Analytica Social Media Posts in Trump and Brexit campaigns – Google News

Our Democracy Depends on Secure Elections – WIRED
 


WIRED
Our Democracy Depends on Secure Elections
WIRED
As members of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, we are helping to lead the Senate’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Each member of our committee remains committed to uncovering the full extent of and more »

Michael Flynn charged in Russia investigation: What to know – Fox News
 


Fox News
Michael Flynn charged in Russia investigation: What to know
Fox News
Aside from Russia, Mueller has also been investigating Flynn’s lobbying work particularly for a Turkish businessman. Flynn Intel Group, Inc., carried out $530,000 worth of lobbying and research work for several months, including during the end of the
The four people charged so far in Russia investigationUSA TODAY
The Latest: WH cancels Trump media event after Flynn pleaThe Mercury News
Michael Flynn’s Guilty Plea Is Bad For Trump In Lots Of WaysFiveThirtyEight
The Hill –Vanity Fair –Daily Beast
all 823 news articles »

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Saved Stories

Saved Stories – None
putin won US 2016 election – Google News: Coming in December on FRONTLINE – FRONTLINE
Coming in December on FRONTLINE – FRONTLINE
Who is Michael Flynn? – CNN
calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News: Who is Michael Flynn? – CNN
Kushner Is Said to Have Ordered Flynn to Contact Russia – Bloomberg
organized crime and intelligence – Google News: Flynn Pleads Guilty: Is He Singing on Trump-Russia? – The Nation.
Felix Sater – Google News: Flynn Pleads Guilty: Is He Singing on Trump-Russia? – The Nation.
Donald Trump | The Guardian: Were other Trump aides lobbying for Israel illicitly alongside Michael Flynn?
Trumpism – Google News: Jerry Earl Johnston: Is Trumpism the latest religious sect? – Deseret News
Under Pressure, Turkey’s President Slams Testimony at Sanctions Trial – Voice of America
Palmer Report: Major newspaper declares Donald Trump a madman
Russian Intelligence services and international organized crime and terrorism – Google News: Michael Flynn’s rise was rapid, his fall even faster – PBS NewsHour
donald trump russia – Google News: Donald Trump’s situation just became much, much worse now Michael Flynn is cooperating with Mueller’s Russia probe – The Independent
The Latest: Dems warn Trump not to interfere in probes – The Mercury News
Erdogan Allowed Turkish Banks to Help Iran Make Illegal Payments, Witness Says — 2nd Update – Fox Business
Cambridge Analytica Social Media Posts in Trump and Brexit campaigns – Google News: The Tech Giants Must Be Reined In – The American Interest
Our Democracy Depends on Secure Elections – WIRED
Michael Flynn charged in Russia investigation: What to know – Fox News
House panel wants records on harassment settlement payments – WHIO
Angus King: Trump ‘Was Inappropriate’ To Call For End To Senate Investigation – Maine Public
Trump’s Treasury Dept finds itself facing a new investigation – MSNBC
Robert Mueller just penetrated the White House gates with Michael Flynn’s guilty plea – Washington Post
6:51 AM 12/1/2017 Trump Pressed Top Republicans to End Senate Russia Inquiry New York Times
The curious case of Jared Kushner and the Israel lobby – Middle East Eye
Trump faces new obstruction allegations in Russia scandal – MSNBC

 

Saved Stories – None
putin won US 2016 election – Google News: Coming in December on FRONTLINE – FRONTLINE
 


FRONTLINE
Coming in December on FRONTLINE
FRONTLINE
With revelations involving Russia’s role in the 2016 presidential election continuing to command the headlines, FRONTLINE will close out the year with an encore presentation of Putin’s Revenge our two-part investigation into how Vladimir Putin came 

 putin won US 2016 election – Google News

Coming in December on FRONTLINE – FRONTLINE
 


FRONTLINE
Coming in December on FRONTLINE
FRONTLINE
Just this morning, Michael Flynn, President Trump’s former national security adviser, pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about conversations with former Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak, the latest charge in special counsel Robert Mueller’s  

Who is Michael Flynn? – CNN
 


CNN
Who is Michael Flynn?
CNN
Flynn was forced to resign after less than a month after he misled Vice President Mike Pence and then-chief of staff Reince Priebus about his conversations with then-Russian Ambassador to the US Sergey Kislyak. Flynn had told them — and the public and more »

calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News: Who is Michael Flynn? – CNN
 


CNN
Who is Michael Flynn?
CNN
Flynn was forced to resign after less than a month after he misled Vice President Mike Pence and then-chief of staff Reince Priebus about his conversations with then-Russian Ambassador to the US Sergey Kislyak. Flynn had told them — and the public 
Key players in the Michael Flynn investigationKTAR.comall 2 news articles »

 calls for Comey’s resignation – Google News

Kushner Is Said to Have Ordered Flynn to Contact Russia – Bloomberg
 


Bloomberg
Kushner Is Said to Have Ordered Flynn to Contact Russia
Bloomberg
This was the context of Kushner’s instruction to Flynn last December. One transition official at the time said Kushner called Flynn to tell him he needed to get every foreign minister or ambassador from a country on the U.N. Security Council to delay 
Donald Trump, Jared Kushner Could Be Next After Michael Flynn Charged by Mueller With Lying to the FBINewsweekall 951 news articles »

organized crime and intelligence – Google News: Flynn Pleads Guilty: Is He Singing on Trump-Russia? – The Nation.
 


The Nation.
Flynn Pleads Guilty: Is He Singing on Trump-Russia?
The Nation.
Just as the FBI does in any routine organizedcrime takedown, Mueller is quietly going after each and every potential participant, starting from the bottom and moving to the top. And in that hierarchy, one of the people who could potentially do the 
The four people charged so far in Russia investigationUSA TODAYall 805 news articles »

 organized crime and intelligence – Google News

Felix Sater – Google News: Flynn Pleads Guilty: Is He Singing on Trump-Russia? – The Nation.
 


The Nation.
Flynn Pleads Guilty: Is He Singing on Trump-Russia?
The Nation.
Third, Flynn could say what he might know about an odd, seemingly Russia-friendly back-channel peace plan for Ukraine that was cooked up among Michael Cohen, Trump’s personal lawyer, a Trump-linked wheeler-dealer named Felix Sater, and a Ukrainian and more »

 Felix Sater – Google News

Donald Trump | The Guardian: Were other Trump aides lobbying for Israel illicitly alongside Michael Flynn?

The ex-national security adviser has admitted trying to get Russia to block a critical UN resolution and an Israeli official stated they sought Trumps helpThe guilty plea entered on Friday by Donald Trumps former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, has raised critical new questions not only about the relationship between the Trump team and Russian officials but also whether Flynn and other members of the Trump transition team were improperly lobbying on behalf of Israel.

Related: Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI as Trump-Russia inquiry takes critical step

Michael Flynn is the fourth Donald Trump aide to face criminal charges in the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 US election and any alleged collusion.

Continue reading…

 Donald Trump | The Guardian

Trumpism – Google News: Jerry Earl Johnston: Is Trumpism the latest religious sect? – Deseret News
 


Deseret News
Jerry Earl Johnston: Is Trumpism the latest religious sect?
Deseret News
Religion, like sports, produces stars. Many stars flash and fade. Others have legs, as they say. Their influence expands. Reza Aslan is a religious writer looking to last. And he’s off to a solid start. Aslan’s book Zealot (Random House, 2013  

 Trumpism – Google News

Under Pressure, Turkey’s President Slams Testimony at Sanctions Trial – Voice of America
 


Voice of America
Under Pressure, Turkey’s President Slams Testimony at Sanctions Trial
Voice of America
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is reacting angrily after testimony in a New York trial implicated him in an alleged multi-million-dollar scam to evade U.S.-imposed sanctions against Iran. His reaction is adding to concerns Ankara is on a 
Turkey PM hopes trader backtracks on sanctions testimony ‘mistake’Digital Journalall 60 news articles »

Palmer Report: Major newspaper declares Donald Trump a madman

We’ve all watched Donald Trump go completely berserk this past week, even by his already-demented standards, in the wake of the news that Michael Flynn has decided to cut a plea deal against him. Trump has publicly attacked the Prime Minister of Great Britain. He’s falsely accused MSNBC morning host Joe Scarborough of having murdered a woman. Now the editorial board of a major newspaper is flatly declaring that Trump is a “madman.”The New York Daily News, a major newspaper from Donald Trump’s hometown, has run an op-ed titled “Donald Trump is a madman: The President’s Wednesday Twitter spasm confirms what many Americans have long suspected.” It has no single author listed, which means that it’s a joint statement from the entire editorial board. It’s nothing short of devastating.

Here’s a sampling of what the NYDN is dishing out in Trump’s direction: “Some might say we are just suffering through the umpteenth canny, calculated presidential eruption designed to distract the nation from special counsel Robert Muellers investigation, or perhaps from unpopular legislation working its way through Congress. Quite possible. But Occams razor, and the sheer strangeness of Trumps behavior, leads us to conclude that we are witnessing signs of mania.” And that’s just the start of the takedown.

It’s unclear the extent to which Donald Trump is purposely trying to create demented distractions to steer media coverage away from Michael Flynn’s plea deal, and the extent to which Trump is simply losing control of what little psychological faculties he may have ever had to begin with. In any case, the net result is the kind of behavior which has set off a whole new level of alarm. The New York Times has published a letter from a psychologist who believes Trump is too mentally unbalanced to be in possession of even personal weapons, let alone nuclear weapons. You can read the New York Daily News “madman” takedown here.

The post Major newspaper declares Donald Trump a “madman” appeared first on Palmer Report.

 Palmer Report

Russian Intelligence services and international organized crime and terrorism – Google News: Michael Flynn’s rise was rapid, his fall even faster – PBS NewsHour
 


PBS NewsHour
Michael Flynn’s rise was rapid, his fall even faster
PBS NewsHour
WASHINGTON Michael Flynn was President Donald Trump’s favorite general, rapidly vaulted to prominence by his fiery speech at the 2016 Republican National Convention and Trump’s decision to reward him with a plum job as his top national security aide and more »

 Russian Intelligence services and international organized crime and terrorism – Google News

donald trump russia – Google News: Donald Trump’s situation just became much, much worse now Michael Flynn is cooperating with Mueller’s Russia probe – The Independent
 


The Independent
Donald Trump’s situation just became much, much worse now Michael Flynn is cooperating with Mueller’sRussia probe
The Independent
There is an old adage among criminal investigators that when you’re investigating something potentially huge, you don’t go for the biggest target first. Rather you work your way slowly and methodically, looking to peel away layers and trying to build 
TrumpRussia: Michael Flynn admits lying to FBIBBC News
Flynn to testify that Trump directed him to make contact with Russians: ReportsCNBC
Michael Flynn’s guilty plea is an absolutely massive problem for Donald TrumpCNN
Telegraph.co.uk –The Guardian –Reuters
all 1,786 news articles »

 donald trump russia – Google News

The Latest: Dems warn Trump not to interfere in probes – The Mercury News
 


The Mercury News
The Latest: Dems warn Trump not to interfere in probes
The Mercury News
FILE In this Feb. 1, 2017 file photo, then-National Security Adviser Michael Flynn speaks during the daily news briefing at the White House, in Washington. The few public signs emanating from special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation 
Michael Flynn charged in Russia investigation: What to knowFox News
The four people charged so far in Russia investigationUSA TODAY
Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI, is cooperating with MuellerCNN
FiveThirtyEight –NBCNews.com –The Hill
all 1,812 news articles »
Erdogan Allowed Turkish Banks to Help Iran Make Illegal Payments, Witness Says — 2nd Update – Fox Business
 


Financial Times
Erdogan Allowed Turkish Banks to Help Iran Make Illegal Payments, Witness Says — 2nd Update
Fox Business
Mr. Zarrab, 34 years old, had been a defendant in the case until he pleaded guilty to seven charges, including sanctions evasion and money laundering, and agreed to testify at trial against Mr. Atilla. The gold trader became a household name in Turkey 
Gold trader tells US court he bribed former Turkish officialFinancial Times
Turkey: trial of banker is plot schemed by US-based clericFox News
Turkish-Iranian gold trader testifies at US trialBoston Herald
Hurriyet Daily News –The Guardian –Middle East Eye
all 193 news articles »
Cambridge Analytica Social Media Posts in Trump and Brexit campaigns – Google News: The Tech Giants Must Be Reined In – The American Interest
 


The American Interest
The Tech Giants Must Be Reined In
The American Interest
But this is only the tip of the iceberg in terms of the kind of meddling the social media giants tolerated. And getting a grip on how to address these issues will be no small feat. The social media business model itself is flawed and unethical; the and more »

 Cambridge Analytica Social Media Posts in Trump and Brexit campaigns – Google News

Our Democracy Depends on Secure Elections – WIRED
 


WIRED
Our Democracy Depends on Secure Elections
WIRED
As members of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, we are helping to lead the Senate’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Each member of our committee remains committed to uncovering the full extent of and more »

Michael Flynn charged in Russia investigation: What to know – Fox News
 


Fox News
Michael Flynn charged in Russia investigation: What to know
Fox News
Aside from Russia, Mueller has also been investigating Flynn’s lobbying work particularly for a Turkish businessman. Flynn Intel Group, Inc., carried out $530,000 worth of lobbying and research work for several months, including during the end of the
The four people charged so far in Russia investigationUSA TODAY
The Latest: WH cancels Trump media event after Flynn pleaThe Mercury News
Michael Flynn’s Guilty Plea Is Bad For Trump In Lots Of WaysFiveThirtyEight
The Hill –Vanity Fair –Daily Beast
all 823 news articles »
House panel wants records on harassment settlement payments – WHIO
 

House panel wants records on harassment settlement payments
WHIO
WASHINGTON The House Ethics Committee is seeking records detailing taxpayer-financed payments made over the years to settle claims of sexual harassment, discrimination and other prohibited behavior by members of Congress. Such settlements go through and more »

Angus King: Trump ‘Was Inappropriate’ To Call For End To Senate Investigation – Maine Public
 


Maine Public
Angus King: Trump ‘Was Inappropriate’ To Call For End To Senate Investigation
Maine Public
According to a new report in the New York Times, Trump repeatedly asked GOP leaders, including the chairman of the committee, to complete the investigation. King responded to the report during an interview Friday on MSNBC. It was inappropriate to make and more »

Trump’s Treasury Dept finds itself facing a new investigation – MSNBC
 


MSNBC
Trump’s Treasury Dept finds itself facing a new investigation
MSNBC
The inquiry was in response to a request from Senator Elizabeth Warren, Democrat of Massachusetts, who called for the inspector general to investigate political meddling in the tax policy office after The New York Times reported on the lack of a and more »

Robert Mueller just penetrated the White House gates with Michael Flynn’s guilty plea – Washington Post
 


Washington Post
Robert Mueller just penetrated the White House gates with Michael Flynn’s guilty plea
Washington Post
But they’re not going to work now that former White House national security adviser Michael Flynn has pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. In Flynn, we have someone who not only actually served in the White House, but someone for whom Trump clearly
Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI, is cooperating with …CNN
Michael Flynn pleads guilty to making false statements to FBI about conversations with Russian ambassadorBusiness Insider
Flynn Says Trump’s Team Directed Talks With Russian EnvoyBloomberg
Daily Beast –National Review –PRI
all 822 news articles »
6:51 AM 12/1/2017 Trump Pressed Top Republicans to End Senate Russia Inquiry New York Times

Saved Stories Saved Stories – None Trump Pressed Top Republicans to End Senate Russia Inquiry – New York Times Donald Trumps petty antics are caving in on him For California attorney general, suing Trump again and again is a team sport – LA Daily News Major new Donald Trump-Russia bombshell breaks involving several key Republican … Continue reading“6:51 AM 12/1/2017 – Trump Pressed Top Republicans to End Senate Russia Inquiry – New York Times”
The curious case of Jared Kushner and the Israel lobby – Middle East Eye
 


Middle East Eye
The curious case of Jared Kushner and the Israel lobby
Middle East Eye
Many analysts who study the region question whether the US putting all its eggs in the Saudi basket is wise considering the unpopularity of the autocratic-theocratic regime both in the region and the world. Last week, the Wall Street Journal reported a
In First, Kushner to Speak Publicly About Trump Peace EffortsHaaretz
In rare public remarks, Kushner to discuss peace push at DC confabThe Times of Israelall 15 news articles »

Trump faces new obstruction allegations in Russia scandal – MSNBC
 


MSNBC
Trump faces new obstruction allegations in Russia scandal
MSNBC
President Trump over the summer repeatedly urged senior Senate Republicans, including the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, to end the panel’s investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election, according to a half dozen 
Trump pressured Republicans to stop Russia investigation. More proof of obstruction of justice?Salon
Trump Has Been Privately Pressuring Republicans to Shut Down Their Russia ProbesVanity Fair
‘Can You Spell Obstruction?’: GOP Senators Admit Trump Asked Them To Curb Russia ProbeCommon Dreams
PoliticusUSA
all 18 news articles »

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12:57 PM 12/1/2017 – Saved Stories: The curious case of Jared Kushner and the Israel lobby

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The curious case of Jared Kushner and the Israel lobby – Middle East Eye
Trump faces new obstruction allegations in Russia scandal – MSNBC
Jared Kushner reportedly ‘100 percent’ behind the push to get Tillerson fired – Business Insider
Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Making False Statements to the FBI
2016 Presidential Election Investigation Fast Facts – KPAX-TV
Please Enjoy This Clip of Michael Flynn Leading a Lock Her Up Chant
If Trump pressured senators to end the Russia probe, it’s not a good look – Washington Post
What Did Michael Flynn Lie About? Everything to Know About the Biggest Robert Mueller Charge Yet – Newsweek
The four people charged so far in Russia investigation – USA TODAY
Donald Trump, Jared Kushner Could Be Next After Michael Flynn Charged By Mueller With Lying To The FBI – Newsweek
Jared Kushner to speak at Saban Forum – The Jerusalem Post
Mike Flynn took part in Trump-Putin call four days after lying to FBI about Russia talks – Raw Story
Flynn Indictment Shows He Committed a More Serious Offense Than Lying to the FBI
Timeline: What Flynn copped to and what he didn’t – Washington Post
Donald Trump begins shuffling deck chairs on the Titanic
Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Lying to the FBI – New York Times
The four men charged in US probe of Trump-Russia ties – Daily Mail
No, the Mueller probe isn’t politically motivated – Washington Post
10:49 AM 11/30/2017 Pompeo has also chafed at the restrictions inherent in running the C.I.A., where he has been expected to be neither seen nor heard.
MI6 lays bare the growing Russian threat – The Times
Cotton cements his rise under Trump – Politico
“It Was Just the Two of Them: Could Obama Be Questioned About Trump and Flynn? – Vanity Fair
Randy Credico, gadfly New York candidate, drawn into Russia probe – Newsday
Jeff Sessions screws up and tells Robert Mueller exactly how to nail Donald Trump
Youre not just imagining it: psychologists say Donald Trump is even further off the deep end than ever

 

Saved Stories – None
The curious case of Jared Kushner and the Israel lobby – Middle East Eye


Middle East Eye
The curious case of Jared Kushner and the Israel lobby
Middle East Eye
Many analysts who study the region question whether the US putting all its eggs in the Saudi basket is wise considering the unpopularity of the autocratic-theocratic regime both in the region and the world. Last week, the Wall Street Journal reported a
In First, Kushner to Speak Publicly About Trump Peace EffortsHaaretz
In rare public remarks, Kushner to discuss peace push at DC confabThe Times of Israel

all 15 news articles »

Trump faces new obstruction allegations in Russia scandal – MSNBC


MSNBC
Trump faces new obstruction allegations in Russia scandal
MSNBC
President Trump over the summer repeatedly urged senior Senate Republicans, including the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, to end the panel’s investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election, according to a half dozen 
Trump pressured Republicans to stop Russia investigation. More proof of obstruction of justice?Salon
Trump Has Been Privately Pressuring Republicans to Shut Down Their Russia ProbesVanity Fair
‘Can You Spell Obstruction?’: GOP Senators Admit Trump Asked Them To Curb Russia ProbeCommon Dreams
PoliticusUSA
all 18 news articles »
Jared Kushner reportedly ‘100 percent’ behind the push to get Tillerson fired – Business Insider


Business Insider
Jared Kushner reportedly ‘100 percent’ behind the push to get Tillerson fired
Business Insider
A plan to oust Secretary of State Rex Tillerson from his Cabinet-level post was orchestrated in part by President Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner, according to multiple sources, one of whom said the two senior administration officials have “been 
Report: Jared Kushner Pushing for Rex Tillerson’s Ouster after Ivanka SnubBreitbart News
Rex Tillerson, Gary Cohn and Jared Kushner expected to leave White House as President Trump’s first year draws to …The Independent
Jared Kushner Pushing for Rex Tillerson’s Ouster after Ivanka SnubNewburgh Gazette
New York Times
all 642 news articles »
Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Making False Statements to the FBI

Michael Flynn, President Donald Trump’s former national security adviser, pleaded guilty on Friday to one count of making false statements to federal authorities and agreed to cooperate with the ongoing federal investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

In his plea, Flynn also said that Trump transition officials directed him to make contacts with the Russian government.

“My guilty plea and agreement to cooperate with the Special Counsel’s Office reflect a decision I made in the best interests of my family and of our country,” Flynn said in a statement. “I accept full responsibility for my actions.

After just 22 days as Trump’s first national security adviser, Flynn was fired from his post in February amid revelations that he had lied to federal authorities about discussing US sanctions imposed on the Russian government with then-Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak. Sally Yates, the acting attorney general at the time, warned White House counsel Don McGahn that Flynn’s misrepresentations of his Kislyak contacts could make him vulnerable to Russian blackmail. Despite Yates’ concerns, Trump did not fire Flynn until 18 days later.

Former FBI director James Comey told the Senate intelligence committee in June that Trump had asked him to drop any investigations into whether Flynn had lied to the FBI about his discussions with Kislyak. I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go,” Trump said, according to Comey. “He is a good guy. I hope you can let this go.

Comey did not drop the matter, and three months later, Trump fired him from his job leading the FBI.

The charges come on the heels of October’s indictments of Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chairman, and his longtime business associate Rick Gates on charges related to tax violations, money laundering, and a plot to conspire against the United States. In August 2016, Manafort was forced to resign from Trump’s campaign after numerous outlets reported on his previously undisclosed lobbying work on behalf of deposed Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych and his pro-Russian political party.

This post has been updated throughout.

2016 Presidential Election Investigation Fast Facts – KPAX-TV

2016 Presidential Election Investigation Fast Facts
KPAX-TV
(CNN) — Here’s a look at investigations into Russian meddling during the 2016 presidential race between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. For details about computer hacking during the campaign, visit 2016 Presidential Campaign Hacking Fast Facts

Please Enjoy This Clip of Michael Flynn Leading a Lock Her Up Chant

Michael Flynn, the former national security adviser for President Donald Trump, is expected to plead guilty on Friday to lying to federal investigators about his interactions with a Russian official after the 2016 election.

Flynn’s confession to having committed a federal crime comes with a special degree of irony, as he was one of the most prominent Trump supporters to lead a “lock her up” chant calling for Hillary Clinton’s imprisonment. “If I did a tenth of what she did, I would be in jail today,” he declared at the Republican National Convention in July 2016.

Clinton has never been charged with a federal crime. Here he is leading the chant:

If Trump pressured senators to end the Russia probe, it’s not a good look – Washington Post


Washington Post
If Trump pressured senators to end the Russia probe, it’s not a good look
Washington Post
Over the summer, President Trump repeatedly urged Senate Republican leaders to end their investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election, the New York Times reported Thursday. It was something along the lines of, ‘I hope you can 
Trump pressured Republicans to stop Russia investigation. More proof of obstruction of justice?Salon

all 16 news articles »

What Did Michael Flynn Lie About? Everything to Know About the Biggest Robert Mueller Charge Yet – Newsweek


USA TODAY
What Did Michael Flynn Lie About? Everything to Know About the Biggest Robert Mueller Charge Yet
Newsweek
Updated | Michael Flynn, President Donald Trump’s former national security adviser, pleaded guilty on Friday to lying to federal agents. The office of Special Counsel Robert Mueller had announced the charge against Flynn earlier on Friday. Mueller is 
Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Lying to the FBINew York Times
The four people charged so far in Russia investigationUSA TODAY
UPDATE: Judge Says ex-Trump Adviser Flynn is Cooperating With Mueller’s InvestigationHouston Public Media
Bloomberg –Atlanta Journal Constitution
all 578 news articles »
The four people charged so far in Russia investigation – USA TODAY


USA TODAY
The four people charged so far in Russia investigation
USA TODAY
Connection To Trump: Served as National Security Adviser in Trump’s White House for less than one month. The day after his Feb. 13 resignation, Flynn emerged as a central figure in yet another episode in the White House-Russia controversy. Former FBI 
Michael Flynn charged in Russia investigation: What to knowFox News
Donald Trump’s situation just became much, much worse if Michael Flynn is cooperating with Mueller’s Russia probeThe Independent
Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI, is cooperating with MuellerCNN
The Hill –Vox –ABC News
all 799 news articles »
Donald Trump, Jared Kushner Could Be Next After Michael Flynn Charged By Mueller With Lying To The FBI – Newsweek


Newsweek
Donald Trump, Jared Kushner Could Be Next After Michael Flynn Charged By Mueller With Lying To The FBI
Newsweek
He is the first member of Trump’s administration, rather than campaign workers, to face charges in Mueller’s probe. Friday’s announcement could have implications, too, for Jared Kushner. Trump’s son-in-law was present along with Flynn at a meeting with 
Michael Flynn Just Flipped on Team TrumpDaily Beast

all 686 news articles »

Jared Kushner to speak at Saban Forum – The Jerusalem Post


The Jerusalem Post
Jared Kushner to speak at Saban Forum
The Jerusalem Post
The Saban Forum is a US-Israeli dialogue, hosted by the Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization. Be the first to know – Join our Facebook page. Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked, Minister for Regional Cooperation Tzachi Hanegbi 

Mike Flynn took part in Trump-Putin call four days after lying to FBI about Russia talks – Raw Story


Raw Story
Mike Flynn took part in Trump-Putin call four days after lying to FBI about Russia talks
Raw Story
The FBI director promised Trump his honesty, but the president pressed him to assure his honest loyalty which Comey refused to grant. On Jan. 28, one week and one day into the administration, Trump and his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin 
Federal prosecutors: Senior Trump transition official directed Flynn to speak to Russian ambassadorBusiness Insider
Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Lying to the FBINew York Times
Former Trump Adviser Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty In Special Counsel’s Russia InvestigationHuffPost
VICE News –Quartz –Washington Post
all 677 news articles »
Flynn Indictment Shows He Committed a More Serious Offense Than Lying to the FBI

On Friday morning, special counsel Robert Mueller announced that he had indicted Michael Flynn, President Donald Trump’s short-lived national security adviser (who had led the “lock her up” cheers at the last Republican convention), on two counts of lying to the FBI and soon after that Flynn pleaded guilty in a federal court in Washington as part of a cooperation deal with Mueller. This means that both Trump’s top campaign official, Paul Manafort, and his top national security campaign aide now stand accused of criminal activity.

Mueller released a two-page “information” document detailing the two counts. The first was no shocker: that Flynn had lied to FBI agents about a conversation he had with Sergey Kislyak, the Russian ambassador to the United States, in December 2016, during the presidential transition. Flynn told the agents that he had not asked Kislyak to restrain Russia’s response to sanctions President Barack Obama was imposing on Moscow for its underhanded meddling in the 2016 campaign. He also told the agents that he did not recall that Kislyak had said that Moscow would indeed moderate its response as a result of his request. But according to Mueller, Flynn had made the request and knew Moscow had done what he asked.

It has been previously reported that there was evidencemost likely intelligence interceptssuggesting Flynn had lied about this interaction with Kislyak. On the day of that conversation, when it appeared Russia would indeed not be responding harshly to the Obama sanctions, Trump tweeted, “Great move on delay (by V. Putin) – I always knew he was very smart.”

The other count expands the story. It notes that on December 22, 2016, Flynn had asked Kislyak to delay or vote against a UN Security Council resolution condemning Israel’s construction of settlements in disputed territories, but that Flynn denied doing so when interviewed by the FBI. Israel was fighting hard against the resolution and requested that the Obama administration veto the measure. At the time, Trump publicly sided with the Israeli government. The resolution was approved on December 23, with the United States abstaining.

Israeli officials, it was known, had reached out to Trump transition team officials prior to the vote in an effort to delay the vote or block the resolution. Those Trump officials included Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law, and Stephen Bannon, then Trump’s chief strategist. Mueller’s indictment discloses that Flynn was part of this endeavor and took concrete steps to thwart the foreign policy of the Obama administration in its final month. (Two weeks ago, the Wall Street Journal revealed that Mueller was investigating Kushner’s conversation with Israeli officials about this matter. The newspaper noted that a 1799 law called the Logan Act prohibits Americans from communicating with foreign officials to influence an overseas governments actions related to a conflict with the United States. No one has ever been successfully prosecuted under this law.)

This part of the indictment shows that prior to Trump’s inauguration, Flynn went beyond attempting to establish a modus vivendi with Moscow. He was secretly asking Kislyak for a favor. (Moscow did not oblige him in this instance.)

That is quite a picture. On October 7, 2016, the US intelligence community released a statement declaring that Russia was behind the hack-and-dump operation that targeted Democrats in order to influence the 2016 presidential campaign. (That statement also suggested that Russia had explored penetrating US vote-counting systems.) About two months earlier, Trump and Flynn had received an intelligence briefing that included information about Russia’s clandestine efforts to subvert the election. Yet during the transition, Flynn, as Trump’s representative, was covertly trying to enlist Moscow’s assistance to undermine existing US policy.

For Moscow, this requestand Flynn’s subsequent plea for a light response to Obama’s sanctionscertainly could be read as an encouraging sign and a signal that Trump was not upset about Vladimir Putin’s intervention in the campaign. Flynn was sending a clear message to Putin’s man in Washington that he and Trump were more interested in partnering with Russia than in holding it accountableor preventing Putin from future attacks on elections in the United States or elsewhere.

That might not have been illegal. But as bad as it is to lie to the FBI, countenancing Russia’s assault on American democracy is a far graver offense.

Timeline: What Flynn copped to and what he didn’t – Washington Post


National Review
Timeline: What Flynn copped to and what he didn’t
Washington Post
This article has been updated. On Friday, another card played from special counsel Robert Mueller III’s closely held hand: An indictment against former national security adviser Michael Flynn for lying to the FBI. By itself, the indictment isn’t 
The Michael Flynn Charge: Monstrous Injustice or Prelude to Bigger Things?National Review
If Flynn Is Small Fry, Who’s the Bigger Fish in Mueller’s Net?The Atlantic
Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Lying to FBI About Russia, Appears to Be Cooperating With MuellerSlate Magazine (blog)
Fox News –Quartz –ABC Action News
all 760 news articles »
Donald Trump begins shuffling deck chairs on the Titanic

Now that even Donald Trump knows he’s hosed in the Russia scandal, the big question has been how he’s going to plot his endgame. In the month since the arrests of his associates began, and in the week since top adviser Michael Flynn decided to cut a plea deal against him, Trump has gone off the deep end on Twitter and in his public remarks. Now he’s moving beyond words and taking action, but that action looks a lot like shuffling the deck chairs as his ship sinks.

On Thursday, it leaked to the media that Trump is planning to fire Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. Once that happens, Trump will promote CIA Director Mike Pompeo, who has been on the job for less than a year, to Secretary of State. Then he’ll promote Senator Tom Cotton, who is less than halfway through his first term, to CIA Director. Then the Republican Governor of Arkansas will appoint someone to replace Tom Cotton.

What does all of this accomplish? Literally nothing. Trump will be going from one comically unqualified Secretary of State to another. On top of it, he appointed Pompeo to run the CIA in the hope that Pompeo would misuse the position to sabotage the Trump-Russia investigation, and that hasn’t worked. It’s unlikely that Cotton will have any greater success in that regard. The only thing Trump will gain here is the satisfaction of getting to fire Tillerson, who committed the crime of calling Trump a “moron” behind his back.

So this is how Donald Trump is using the limited time and dwindling political capital he has left. He’s not using it to try to save himself. Instead, as his Trump-Russia scandal prepares to completely sink him, he’s focused on settling internal scores with an ally who made an out-of-turn remark while frustrated one day. He’s sunk.

The post Donald Trump begins shuffling deck chairs on the Titanic appeared first on Palmer Report.

Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Lying to the FBI – New York Times


Chicago Tribune
Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Lying to the FBI
New York Times
WASHINGTON President Trump’s former national security adviser, Michael T. Flynn, pleaded guilty on Friday to lying to the F.B.I. about conversations with the Russian ambassador last December during the presidential transition, bringing the special
Ex-Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBIChicago Tribune
The four people charged so far in Russia investigationUSA TODAY
Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI in Mueller probeNBCNews.com
6abc.com –Bloomberg
all 474 news articles »
The four men charged in US probe of Trump-Russia ties – Daily Mail

The four men charged in US probe of Trump-Russia ties
Daily Mail
Former Trump campaign adviser George Papadopoulos. Papadopoulos, a Chicago-based international energy lawyer, pleaded guilty on Oct. 30 to lying to FBI agents about contacts with people who claimed to have ties to top Russian officials. It was the 

No, the Mueller probe isn’t politically motivated – Washington Post


Washington Post
No, the Mueller probe isn’t politically motivated
Washington Post
There has been a lot of debate recently about the criminalization of politics. Among those concerned about the issue, a prominent voice belongs to Harvard law professor emeritus Alan Dershowitz. On television, on Twitter and most recently in an op-ed 

10:49 AM 11/30/2017 Pompeo has also chafed at the restrictions inherent in running the C.I.A., where he has been expected to be neither seen nor heard.

Pompeo has also chafed at the restrictions inherent in running the C.I.A., where he has been expected to be neither seen nor heard. I think part of it is he has signaled his frustrations with his current job, which would make the transition much easier, the second State Department staffer said. He is already a … Continue reading“10:49 AM 11/30/2017 – Pompeo has also chafed at the restrictions inherent in running the C.I.A., where he has been expected to be neither seen nor heard.”
MI6 lays bare the growing Russian threat – The Times

MI6 lays bare the growing Russian threat
The Times
As Victor Madeira, a specialist in Russian spookdom, told parliament last year, the combined strength of all Britain’s defence attachés, the Intelligence and Royal Signals Corps, plus all other army, navy and air force intelligence, surveillance and 

Cotton cements his rise under Trump – Politico


Politico
Cotton cements his rise under Trump
Politico
He also embodies one of the GOP’s responses to Trump. Having already shared some of the president’s populist leanings, he has worked to co-opt and shape the president rather than rail against him. An ideological conservative from the American heartland 
Trump’s national security shake-up will make the world a much more dangerous placeWashington Post
Interrogators Blast Trump’s ‘Clueless’ CIA Pick Tom CottonDaily Beast

all 10 news articles »

“It Was Just the Two of Them: Could Obama Be Questioned About Trump and Flynn? – Vanity Fair


Christian Science Monitor
It Was Just the Two of Them: Could Obama Be Questioned About Trump and Flynn?
Vanity Fair
On November 10, 2016, two days after his stunning election victory, Donald Trump met with President Barack Obama, alone, in the Oval Office, for 90 minutes. They covered plenty of important ground, including the nuclear threat from North Korea and the 
This Is What Mueller Probably Wanted to Know From Jared Kushner About Mike FlynnNewsweek
Kushner questioned by Mueller investigation teamChristian Science Monitor
Jared Kushner’s ties to the White House, link to the Russia investigationFox News
Torrington Register Citizen –NPR
all 170 news articles »
Randy Credico, gadfly New York candidate, drawn into Russia probe – Newsday


Newsday
Randy Credico, gadfly New York candidate, drawn into Russia probe
Newsday
Asked about Credico’s role as an intermediary, Stolar said: It’s absurd to think that Randy is somehow involved in some dark stuff that is going to help Trump or hurt Hillary. That’s not his style, that’s not Randy. Stone confirmed Thursday on 
Intel committee subpoenas comedian who met with Julian Assange in Russia probeAOL

all 13 news articles »

Jeff Sessions screws up and tells Robert Mueller exactly how to nail Donald Trump

All along, Attorney General Jeff Sessions has been trying to walk a tightrope between protecting himself in the Trump-Russia scandal (so he won’t go to prison) and avoiding saying anything incriminating about Donald Trump in the scandal (so he won’t get fired). He lied to protect himself and Trump during his Senate confirmation hearings, and when that backfired, he recused himself from the investigation in order to protect himself at Trump’s expense. He’s continued to play that game all year but now he’s finally blown it.

During numerous hearings before Congress this year, Sessions has relied on a combination of saying he couldn’t recall the answer to any given question in some instances, and saying he wasn’t allowed to answer the question due to executive privilege in other instances. Whenever incriminating evidence has surfaced, he’s suddenly and conveniently remembered that specific event accordingly. Because his Republican pals control the majority on these congressional committees, Sessions has been able to slide along with this nonsense without being held in contempt of Congress, until now.

The tricky part to refusing to answer certain questions is that you end up giving yourself away when you then choose to answer other questions. Whenever Jeff Sessions has faced an accusation that he thought he could get away with steadfastly denying, he’s done so. For instance, when Democratic Congressman Adam Schiff asked Sessions today whether he “was ever instructed by the president to take any action that he believed would hinder the Russia investigation,” Sessions refused to answer the question. Oops.

Here’s the problem: Jeff Sessions just tacitly admitted that Donald Trump did ask him to hinder the Russia investigation. It tells Special Counsel Robert Mueller precisely where to dig when it comes to nailing Trump for obstruction of justice. Perhaps more importantly, it tells Mueller precisely what to ask Sessions when he inevitably interviews him and Sessions won’t be able to get away with dodging the question when Mueller asks it. Sessions may have just backed himself into eventually having to cut a deal with Mueller against Trump.

The post Jeff Sessions screws up and tells Robert Mueller exactly how to nail Donald Trump appeared first on Palmer Report.

Youre not just imagining it: psychologists say Donald Trump is even further off the deep end than ever

Over the past month in general since the arrests of his underlings began, and over the past week in particular since Michael Flynn decided to cut a plea deal against him, it’s felt like Donald Trump has gone even further off the deep end than usual. His tweets have seemed even more horrid and inappropriate. His public appearances have seemed even more grotesque. It turns out it’s not just fatigue that’s causing you to think Trump is getting psychologically worse; experts are now confirming that he is getting worse.

Dr. Bandy X. Lee of the Yale School of Medicine has written a letter to the editor of the New York Times in which she spells out that Donald Trump is in fact in rapid psychological decline. She says she represents thousands of psychologists who agree with her general assessment. Here’s the most damning portion of Dr. Lee’s view:

“We are currently witnessing more than his usual state of instability in fact, a pattern of decompensation: increasing loss of touch with reality, marked signs of volatility and unpredictable behavior, and an attraction to violence as a means of coping. These characteristics place our country and the world at extreme risk of danger. Ordinarily, we carry out a routine process for treating people who are dangerous: containment, removal from access to weapons and an urgent evaluation.”

That’s right, medical doctors now believe Donald Trump’s psychological condition has worsened to the point that they don’t even believe it’s safe for him to be around personal weapons such as handguns or knives or blunt objects. Yet because the Republican Congress is still trying to prop Trump up a bit longer in order to pass its tax scam, the clinically unstable Trump has access to nuclear weapons. You can read Dr. Lee’s full letter to the editor here.

The post You’re not just imagining it: psychologists say Donald Trump is even further off the deep end than ever appeared first on Palmer Report.


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12:23 PM 12/1/2017 – “Now that even Donald Trump knows he’s hosed in the Russia scandal, the big question has been how he’s going to plot his endgame.” – Donald Trump begins shuffling deck chairs on the Titanic

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Saved Stories

Saved Stories – None
Donald Trump begins shuffling deck chairs on the Titanic
Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Lying to the FBI – New York Times
The four men charged in US probe of Trump-Russia ties – Daily Mail
No, the Mueller probe isn’t politically motivated – Washington Post
10:49 AM 11/30/2017 Pompeo has also chafed at the restrictions inherent in running the C.I.A., where he has been expected to be neither seen nor heard.
MI6 lays bare the growing Russian threat – The Times
Cotton cements his rise under Trump – Politico
“It Was Just the Two of Them: Could Obama Be Questioned About Trump and Flynn? – Vanity Fair
Randy Credico, gadfly New York candidate, drawn into Russia probe – Newsday
Jeff Sessions screws up and tells Robert Mueller exactly how to nail Donald Trump
Youre not just imagining it: psychologists say Donald Trump is even further off the deep end than ever
Rex Tillerson’s career as secretary of state under Trump – Fox News
Immigrant deported multiple times found not guilty in fatal shooting of Kathryn Steinle – Los Angeles Times
Tillerson’s fall could turn State into a hawk’s nest – Washington Post
Mexican man found not guilty of murder in San Francisco case Trump condemned
Republican Senate gives away that it thinks Donald Trumps time is very short
Trump Pressed Top Republicans to End Senate Russia Inquiry – New York Times
Donald Trumps petty antics are caving in on him
For California attorney general, suing Trump again and again is a team sport – LA Daily News
Major new Donald Trump-Russia bombshell breaks involving several key Republican Senators
Donald Trump just lost a key defense in his Trump-Russia scandal
A ‘very forceful’ Trump pushed Republican congressional leaders to shut down the Russia investigation – Business Insider
Argentina Abandons Rescue Mission for Crew of Missing Submarine – U.S. News & World Report
White House Says Homeland Security Advisor Is ‘Keeping an Eye’ on Bitcoin – Gizmodo
White House Press Secretary: Trump Elevated the Conversation by Sharing Anti-Muslim Videos – Mother Jones

 

Saved Stories – None
Donald Trump begins shuffling deck chairs on the Titanic

Now that even Donald Trump knows he’s hosed in the Russia scandal, the big question has been how he’s going to plot his endgame. In the month since the arrests of his associates began, and in the week since top adviser Michael Flynn decided to cut a plea deal against him, Trump has gone off the deep end on Twitter and in his public remarks. Now he’s moving beyond words and taking action, but that action looks a lot like shuffling the deck chairs as his ship sinks.

On Thursday, it leaked to the media that Trump is planning to fire Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. Once that happens, Trump will promote CIA Director Mike Pompeo, who has been on the job for less than a year, to Secretary of State. Then he’ll promote Senator Tom Cotton, who is less than halfway through his first term, to CIA Director. Then the Republican Governor of Arkansas will appoint someone to replace Tom Cotton.

What does all of this accomplish? Literally nothing. Trump will be going from one comically unqualified Secretary of State to another. On top of it, he appointed Pompeo to run the CIA in the hope that Pompeo would misuse the position to sabotage the Trump-Russia investigation, and that hasn’t worked. It’s unlikely that Cotton will have any greater success in that regard. The only thing Trump will gain here is the satisfaction of getting to fire Tillerson, who committed the crime of calling Trump a “moron” behind his back.

So this is how Donald Trump is using the limited time and dwindling political capital he has left. He’s not using it to try to save himself. Instead, as his Trump-Russia scandal prepares to completely sink him, he’s focused on settling internal scores with an ally who made an out-of-turn remark while frustrated one day. He’s sunk.

The post Donald Trump begins shuffling deck chairs on the Titanic appeared first on Palmer Report.

Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Lying to the FBI – New York Times
 


Chicago Tribune
Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty to Lying to the FBI
New York Times
WASHINGTON President Trump’s former national security adviser, Michael T. Flynn, pleaded guilty on Friday to lying to the F.B.I. about conversations with the Russian ambassador last December during the presidential transition, bringing the special
Ex-Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBIChicago Tribune
The four people charged so far in Russia investigationUSA TODAY
Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to FBI in Mueller probeNBCNews.com
6abc.com –Bloomberg
all 474 news articles »
The four men charged in US probe of Trump-Russia ties – Daily Mail
 

The four men charged in US probe of Trump-Russia ties
Daily Mail
Former Trump campaign adviser George Papadopoulos. Papadopoulos, a Chicago-based international energy lawyer, pleaded guilty on Oct. 30 to lying to FBI agents about contacts with people who claimed to have ties to top Russian officials. It was the  

No, the Mueller probe isn’t politically motivated – Washington Post
 


Washington Post
No, the Mueller probe isn’t politically motivated
Washington Post
There has been a lot of debate recently about the criminalization of politics. Among those concerned about the issue, a prominent voice belongs to Harvard law professor emeritus Alan Dershowitz. On television, on Twitter and most recently in an op-ed  

10:49 AM 11/30/2017 Pompeo has also chafed at the restrictions inherent in running the C.I.A., where he has been expected to be neither seen nor heard.

Pompeo has also chafed at the restrictions inherent in running the C.I.A., where he has been expected to be neither seen nor heard. I think part of it is he has signaled his frustrations with his current job, which would make the transition much easier, the second State Department staffer said. He is already a … Continue reading“10:49 AM 11/30/2017 – Pompeo has also chafed at the restrictions inherent in running the C.I.A., where he has been expected to be neither seen nor heard.”
MI6 lays bare the growing Russian threat – The Times
 

MI6 lays bare the growing Russian threat
The Times
As Victor Madeira, a specialist in Russian spookdom, told parliament last year, the combined strength of all Britain’s defence attachés, the Intelligence and Royal Signals Corps, plus all other army, navy and air force intelligence, surveillance and  

Cotton cements his rise under Trump – Politico
 


Politico
Cotton cements his rise under Trump
Politico
He also embodies one of the GOP’s responses to Trump. Having already shared some of the president’s populist leanings, he has worked to co-opt and shape the president rather than rail against him. An ideological conservative from the American heartland 
Trump’s national security shake-up will make the world a much more dangerous placeWashington Post
Interrogators Blast Trump’s ‘Clueless’ CIA Pick Tom CottonDaily Beastall 10 news articles »

“It Was Just the Two of Them: Could Obama Be Questioned About Trump and Flynn? – Vanity Fair
 


Christian Science Monitor
It Was Just the Two of Them: Could Obama Be Questioned About Trump and Flynn?
Vanity Fair
On November 10, 2016, two days after his stunning election victory, Donald Trump met with President Barack Obama, alone, in the Oval Office, for 90 minutes. They covered plenty of important ground, including the nuclear threat from North Korea and the 
This Is What Mueller Probably Wanted to Know From Jared Kushner About Mike FlynnNewsweek
Kushner questioned by Mueller investigation teamChristian Science Monitor
Jared Kushner’s ties to the White House, link to the Russia investigationFox News
Torrington Register Citizen –NPR
all 170 news articles »
Randy Credico, gadfly New York candidate, drawn into Russia probe – Newsday
 


Newsday
Randy Credico, gadfly New York candidate, drawn into Russia probe
Newsday
Asked about Credico’s role as an intermediary, Stolar said: It’s absurd to think that Randy is somehow involved in some dark stuff that is going to help Trump or hurt Hillary. That’s not his style, that’s not Randy. Stone confirmed Thursday on 
Intel committee subpoenas comedian who met with Julian Assange in Russia probeAOLall 13 news articles »

Jeff Sessions screws up and tells Robert Mueller exactly how to nail Donald Trump

All along, Attorney General Jeff Sessions has been trying to walk a tightrope between protecting himself in the Trump-Russia scandal (so he won’t go to prison) and avoiding saying anything incriminating about Donald Trump in the scandal (so he won’t get fired). He lied to protect himself and Trump during his Senate confirmation hearings, and when that backfired, he recused himself from the investigation in order to protect himself at Trump’s expense. He’s continued to play that game all year but now he’s finally blown it.During numerous hearings before Congress this year, Sessions has relied on a combination of saying he couldn’t recall the answer to any given question in some instances, and saying he wasn’t allowed to answer the question due to executive privilege in other instances. Whenever incriminating evidence has surfaced, he’s suddenly and conveniently remembered that specific event accordingly. Because his Republican pals control the majority on these congressional committees, Sessions has been able to slide along with this nonsense without being held in contempt of Congress, until now.

The tricky part to refusing to answer certain questions is that you end up giving yourself away when you then choose to answer other questions. Whenever Jeff Sessions has faced an accusation that he thought he could get away with steadfastly denying, he’s done so. For instance, when Democratic Congressman Adam Schiff asked Sessions today whether he “was ever instructed by the president to take any action that he believed would hinder the Russia investigation,” Sessions refused to answer the question. Oops.

Here’s the problem: Jeff Sessions just tacitly admitted that Donald Trump did ask him to hinder the Russia investigation. It tells Special Counsel Robert Mueller precisely where to dig when it comes to nailing Trump for obstruction of justice. Perhaps more importantly, it tells Mueller precisely what to ask Sessions when he inevitably interviews him and Sessions won’t be able to get away with dodging the question when Mueller asks it. Sessions may have just backed himself into eventually having to cut a deal with Mueller against Trump.

The post Jeff Sessions screws up and tells Robert Mueller exactly how to nail Donald Trump appeared first on Palmer Report.

Youre not just imagining it: psychologists say Donald Trump is even further off the deep end than ever

Over the past month in general since the arrests of his underlings began, and over the past week in particular since Michael Flynn decided to cut a plea deal against him, it’s felt like Donald Trump has gone even further off the deep end than usual. His tweets have seemed even more horrid and inappropriate. His public appearances have seemed even more grotesque. It turns out it’s not just fatigue that’s causing you to think Trump is getting psychologically worse; experts are now confirming that he is getting worse.Dr. Bandy X. Lee of the Yale School of Medicine has written a letter to the editor of the New York Times in which she spells out that Donald Trump is in fact in rapid psychological decline. She says she represents thousands of psychologists who agree with her general assessment. Here’s the most damning portion of Dr. Lee’s view:

“We are currently witnessing more than his usual state of instability in fact, a pattern of decompensation: increasing loss of touch with reality, marked signs of volatility and unpredictable behavior, and an attraction to violence as a means of coping. These characteristics place our country and the world at extreme risk of danger. Ordinarily, we carry out a routine process for treating people who are dangerous: containment, removal from access to weapons and an urgent evaluation.”

That’s right, medical doctors now believe Donald Trump’s psychological condition has worsened to the point that they don’t even believe it’s safe for him to be around personal weapons such as handguns or knives or blunt objects. Yet because the Republican Congress is still trying to prop Trump up a bit longer in order to pass its tax scam, the clinically unstable Trump has access to nuclear weapons. You can read Dr. Lee’s full letter to the editor here.

The post You’re not just imagining it: psychologists say Donald Trump is even further off the deep end than ever appeared first on Palmer Report.

Rex Tillerson’s career as secretary of state under Trump – Fox News
 


New York Post
Rex Tillerson’s career as secretary of state under Trump
Fox News
The President opened the meeting with President Putin by raising the concerns of the American people regarding Russian interference in the 2016 election, Tillerson later told reporters. They had a very robust and lengthy exchange on the subject. The 
Tillerson’s exit can only begin to fix US foreign policyNew York Post
Meet Mike Pompeo, your likely new and Trump-friendly secretary of stateVox
Do Not Let Tom Cotton Anywhere Near the CIASlate Magazineall 590 525 news articles »

Immigrant deported multiple times found not guilty in fatal shooting of Kathryn Steinle – Los Angeles Times
 


Los Angeles Times
Immigrant deported multiple times found not guilty in fatal shooting of Kathryn Steinle
Los Angeles Times
Let me start out by expressing my sincere condolences to the Steinle family, defense attorney Matt Gonzalez told news outlets after the verdict. I hope that they do not interpret this verdict as diminishing in any way the awful tragedy that and more »

Tillerson’s fall could turn State into a hawk’s nest – Washington Post
 


Washington Post
Tillerson’s fall could turn State into a hawk’s nest
Washington Post
The bad marriage of President Trump and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson seems to be nearing an end, probably to the relief of both. The question is how the new national security team that appears to be coming will change American policy. Tillerson for and more »

Mexican man found not guilty of murder in San Francisco case Trump condemned

Jose Ines Garcia Zarate said death of Kate Steinle was accidental in case that fueled debate over immigration and sanctuary citiesA jury on Thursday found a Mexican man not guilty of murder in the killing of a woman on a San Francisco pier that touched off a national immigration debate two years ago.

Jose Ines Garcia Zarate had been deported five times and was wanted for a sixth deportation when Kate Steinle was fatally shot in the back while walking with her father on the pier.

Continue reading…

Republican Senate gives away that it thinks Donald Trumps time is very short

Even as the Republican Congress has been trying to prop up a sinking Donald Trump in the hope that he’ll last long enough for them to pass their tax scam for the wealthy, an entirely different undercurrent has been brewing beneath it all. Michael Flynn has decided to cut a devastating plea deal against Trump, which will expose many of the deepest Trump-Russia secrets, suggesting that Trump’s remaining time may be short. On Thursday night, the Republican Congress gave away that it’s of the same belief.Just as the Republican Senate was preparing to hold a full vote on its tax bill, it suddenly realized that it didn’t have the votes, and canceled the vote. Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein confirmed as much via her Twitter account (link), and she urged the public to continue to call wavering Republican Senators on the phone. This means that the GOP Senate never had the votes to begin with, and that it rushed the bill out of committee this week without knowing whether it had the votes. There is only one reason to have done this.

The Republican Party clearly believes it’s in a race against time to get this bill passed while it still can. This is despite the fact that the Republicans will continue to have majority control over Congress for another year. The only possible explanation for the GOP’s reckless haste on the tax bill is that it believes Donald Trump’s presidency is about to become so untenable that the focus will have to shift to his impending ouster, thus preventing the GOP from being able to pass any of its partisan legislation.

In turn, there’s only one reason for the Republican Party to believe that Donald Trump’s time is short: it thinks something is about to publicly surface that’s going to change the entire narrative. Some Republican Senators have access to classified information that we don’t. Do they have reason to believe that something is about to hit the newswires? It could be anything from the Pee Pee Tape to the evidence that Michael Flynn has been sitting on. But the GOP sure does suddenly think that Trump’s time has grown very short.

The post Republican Senate gives away that it thinks Donald Trump’s time is very short appeared first on Palmer Report.

Trump Pressed Top Republicans to End Senate Russia Inquiry – New York Times
 


New York Times
Trump Pressed Top Republicans to End Senate Russia Inquiry
New York Times
WASHINGTON President Trump over the summer repeatedly urged senior Senate Republicans, including the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, to end the panel’s investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election, according to a half 
Top Intel Dem: Sessions refused to say whether Trump asked him to hinder Russia probeThe Hillall 118 news articles »

Donald Trumps petty antics are caving in on him

If Donald Trump wanted to give himself the best chance of surviving this new and devastating phase of his Trump-Russia scandal where Michael Flynn flips on him and exposes his darkest secrets, he’d only have to do one thing. He’d have to stop the Twitter antics and bring in a professional political operative who can coach him on how to impersonate presidential behavior. Instead, Trump has decided to sharply go the other way and it’s getting uglier by the minute.We’ve all seen the tweets this past week since it was revealed that Michael Flynn had sold Donald Trump out. Trump is either looking to create a distraction from the Russia scandal, or he’s simply dissolving into an even deeper level of psychological deterioration, or some combination of both. His antics are getting worse by the day. Now we know that he’s not merely content to go berserk on Twitter; he’s acting out in the same manner when it comes to his own administration.

On Thursday several news outlets reported that Trump is preparing to fire Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and replace him with current CIA Director Mike Pompeo. By Thursday evening, the other half of the story surfaced: Trump leaked the news on purpose because he wanted to “publicly shame” Tillerson (linknot part of Trump’s base, but are still giving him the benefit of the doubt anyway. These kinds of fence-sitters don’t know or care about partisan issues, but they despise things like incompetece, which they see as unpresidential. By airing his own dirty laundry about why he’s ousting his Secretary of State for petty personal reasons, Trump is merely telling the fence-sitters why they should give up on him. He’s making it easy for them. He’ll drive his own approval rating into the twenties and then it’s over for him.

The post Donald Trump’s petty antics are caving in on him appeared first on Palmer Report.

For California attorney general, suing Trump again and again is a team sport – LA Daily News
 


LA Daily News
For California attorney general, suing Trump again and again is a team sport
LA Daily News
But given the blue hue of California’s electorate, the question of who is best suited to take on the Trump administration is likely to dominate next year’s race. That’s a really fundamental shift in the nature of the job, said Paul Nolette, a  

Major new Donald Trump-Russia bombshell breaks involving several key Republican Senators

On Thursday evening, the Republican Senate abruptly and unexpectedly canceled its expected tax bill vote suggesting that something was afoot. Barely an hour later, the New York Times published a major bombshell story detailing a prolonged obstruction of justice effort involving Donald Trump and several key members of the Republican Senate. Moreover, it appears the story may have been timed to derail the tax vote.At 7:49pm on Thursday evening, Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein tweeted “BREAKING: Republicans just canceled tonights vote on their tax bill. They still dont have enough votes to pass this awful bill.” Shortly thereafter, the New York Times published a story titled “Trump Pressed Top Republicans to End Senate Russia Inquiry.” It details how Donald Trump spent the summer asking everyone from Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to Senator Roy Blunt to derail the Trump-Russia investigation.

This bombshell story connecting several Republican Senate leaders to obstruction of justice comes just as the Republican Senate was about to vote on a tax bill which it believed would pass. The delay of the vote on Thursday night strongly suggests that the GOP had already learned that it didn’t have the votes it thought it did. But the timing of the NY Times story (link) suggests that Senate Democrats already had this story lined up as a last ditch effort at spooking their Republican counterparts into backing down from putting themselves into the spotlight by passing the tax bill.

To be clear, the NYT story doesn’t implicate any of the Republican Senators for obstruction of justice. But it does make clear that they knew Trump was trying to commit obstruction of justice. Failure to report that kind of thing is considered to be “misprision of a felony” under the law, and is a felony in and of itself. In any case, this new bombshell marries the Republican Senate to the Trump-Russia scandal, and it changes the entire dynamic.

The post Major new Donald Trump-Russia bombshell breaks involving several key Republican Senatorsappeared first on Palmer Report.

Donald Trump just lost a key defense in his Trump-Russia scandal

As the Trump-Russia scandal and investigation have gradually marched closer to Donald Trump’s front door, he and his legal team and political allies have been floating various possible defenses. Some of them have been harebrained legal schemes, while others have been designed to influence the court of public opinion. It’s still not clear that Trump’s attorneys have any coherent plan for protecting him. We do, however, know that Trump just lost what would have been one of his key defenses.Donald Trump is eventually going to be proven guilty on everything from treason-related charges to money laundering. He’s led a lifetime of crime. His crimes during the election weren’t the beginning of his crime spree; they only served to amplify his lifelong pattern. Yet the swiftest way to prove Trump guilty on something, and thus get him out of office, is the same path that prosecutors took for forcing Richard Nixon out: obstruction of justice. Thursday night’s obstruction bombshell just changed everything.

It’s long been known that Special Counsel Robert Mueller is pursuing Donald Trump for obstruction of justice in relation to the firing of FBI Director James Comey and the attempted coverup of Donald Trump Jr’s Russia meeting. But now we may have a quicker way of proving obstruction. The New York Times just confirmed that Trump asked several key Republican Senators to end the Russia investigation (link). This is an easy case to prove, and the Senators themselves will easily decide to cooperate against Trump in an effort to avoid facing criminal charges themselves. It gets even uglier for Trump.

Former prosecutor Joyce Vance appeared on Rachel Maddow’s MSNBC show on Thursday evening and explained that when it comes to this kind of obstruction of justice, ignorance of the law is not considered a valid legal defense. In other words, Donald Trump can’t simply claim that he was too naive about politics to realize he was committing a felony by asking the GOP to scuttle the investigation. Trump just lost what would have been a key defense.

The post Donald Trump just lost a key defense in his Trump-Russia scandal appeared first on Palmer Report.

A ‘very forceful’ Trump pushed Republican congressional leaders to shut down the Russia investigation – Business Insider
 


Business Insider
A ‘very forceful’ Trump pushed Republican congressional leaders to shut down the Russia investigation
Business Insider
President Donald Trump has reportedly been lobbying Republican members of Congress to end their investigations ofRussia’s meddling in the 2016 election. Trump urged Sen. Richard Burr, who chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee, to shut down the 
Trump Pressed Top Republicans to End Senate Russia InquiryNew York Times
Report: Trump pressured Republican lawmakers to end Russia probeVox
Trump pressured Senate Intel, GOP to end Russia investigation, report saysFox News
New York Magazine –CNBC –The Hill –Senator Dianne Feinstein
all 162 news articles »
Argentina Abandons Rescue Mission for Crew of Missing Submarine – U.S. News & World Report
 


U.S. News & World Report
Argentina Abandons Rescue Mission for Crew of Missing Submarine
U.S. News & World Report
A bouquet of flowers and banners in support of the 44 crew members of the missing at sea ARA San Juan submarine are placed on a fence outside an Argentine naval base in Mar del Plata, Argentina November 25, 2017. The banner below reads “God, give 
Argentina ends missing sub rescue missionBBC News
Argentine Navy Gives Up Hope of Finding Submarine Crew AliveNew York Times
Argentina’s missing submarine: ‘No one will be rescued’The Guardian
Fox News –International Business Times –gulfnews.com –Daily Star
all 50 news articles »
White House Says Homeland Security Advisor Is ‘Keeping an Eye’ on Bitcoin – Gizmodo
 


Gizmodo
White House Says Homeland Security Advisor Is ‘Keeping an Eye’ on Bitcoin
Gizmodo
After months of explosive price jumps, Bitcoin finally had a moment at the White House press briefing on Thursday. Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders may, or may not, have said something important about it. As is often the case with Sanders, it was and more »

White House Press Secretary: Trump Elevated the Conversation by Sharing Anti-Muslim Videos – Mother Jones
 


Mother Jones
White House Press Secretary: Trump Elevated the Conversation by Sharing Anti-Muslim Videos
Mother Jones
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders on Thursday refused to back down from her defense President Donald Trump’s decision to share a string of inflammatory videos that purported to show Muslims attacking people and, in one case, destroying and more »


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8:10 AM 12/1/2017 – Sen. Cotton or Dir. Silk, you still gotta serve somebody; or: “Six years ago, he was a kid looking for a job and running for a House seat.”

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Bob Dylan – Gotta Serve Somebody

“My luck to wear cotton, my luck to wear silk”

________________________________

4.15.17 - FBI Reportedly Has 'Concrete and Corroborative Evidence' of Trump/Russia Collusion

8:10 AM 12/1/2017 – Is Sen. Cotton one of the “Russian dolls”? This is a very reasonable question to ask. Who will provide THE DEFINITIVE ANSWER?!

Another good question is: Will Sen. Cotton be able to be transformed into a “Director Silk”? “Not to be seen and not to be heard” from, just about, and strictly on as needed basis. I guess, it all depends on taste and comfort level: some like to wear silk, some – cotton, and still some – leather or furs. But never polyester. Never fakes. However, before “you shall know the truth”, it can make you very free, and in many different respects.  

By the way, Sen. Burr (probably, among the many puzzled others), is long in the thrall of Sen. Cotton’s likings for beards. Is this like some kind of a “smell test”?

(See the videotapes with his jokes on this subject at one of the Trump – Russia Investigation Senate Hearings.) 

In my humble opinion, the times and the circumstances would be more congruent with, and the interests of the country would probably be better served if the head of the CIA is a non-partisan or bi-partisan, well-respected person without any formal career concerns or considerations, and of high visibility and stature, and possibly from the military or the national security circles. The continuing tightenings of controls by these strata appear to be the most logical and beneficial response of the wounded or infected government organism, including the current Presidential Administration itself. 

Michael Novakhov

12.1.17

Quotes: 

“Cotton’s appointment would cement his meteoric rise [this type of the propulsion is always somewhat suspect – M.N.] in Republican politics, the result of qualities that have taken him, in a matter of years, from freshman congressman to the youngest serving U.S. senator to, potentially, the youngest CIA director in American history: loyalty, brains and raw ambition.

He also embodies one of the GOP’s responses to Trump. Having already shared some of the president’s populist leanings, he has worked to co-opt and shape the president rather than rail against him.

Within the intelligence community, Cotton is viewed as a political grandstander who might lack the experience to lead a workforce largely older and more experienced than he is. It’s also a post, some said, that has left many of its occupants politically bruised no matter how much experience they have brought to Langley.

Among Cotton allies, views on his possible elevation to the Trump Cabinet are mixed. Some cheer it as a promotion that offers a natural jumping off point for a man whose presidential ambitions are a poorly kept secret.

“The Senate is a horrible place, who would want to spend their life there?” said one Cotton ally.

“Six years ago, he was a kid looking for a job and running for a House seat.

People who are head of the CIA have a history of being vice-presidential nominees and going on to serve as presidents.”

__________________________________

Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks

Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks
Sen. Cotton – Google Search
Alex Younger – Google Search
MI6 lays bare the growing Russian threat – The Times – Google Search
MI6 lays bare the growing Russian threat | Comment | The Times & The Sunday Times
MI6 lays bare the growing Russian threat – The Times
Cotton cements his rise under Trump – Politico
“It Was Just the Two of Them: Could Obama Be Questioned About Trump and Flynn? – Vanity Fair
Tillerson’s fall could turn State into a hawk’s nest – Washington Post
Mexican man found not guilty of murder in San Francisco case Trump condemned
Trump Pressed Top Republicans to End Senate Russia Inquiry – New York Times
Trump’s behavior raises questions of competency – CNN
White House Plans Tillerson Ouster From State Dept., to Be Replaced by Pompeo, Within Weeks – New York Times
White House has plan to oust Tillerson, replace with Pompeo
Michael Flynn, Trump’s ex-National Security Adviser, focus of Russia investigation: What to know
Michael Flynn, Trump’s ex-National Security Adviser, focus of Russia investigation: What to know – Fox News
Trump Wants to Install a Reliable Mouthpiece on Russia at the CIA Mother Jones
Trump Wants to Install a Reliable Mouthpiece on Russia at the CIA – Mother Jones
Today’s Headlines and Commentary
Sick Puppy Kim – Google Search
White House readies plan to replace Tillerson with Pompeo at State, install Cotton at CIA – The Washington Post
Why won’t Trump stand up to Putin? – Boulder Weekly
Susan Collins: ‘No Reason To Be Concerned’ That Trump Is Unhinged
Donald Trump Makes Fun Of Asian Leaders Who Hosted Him
Factbox: Five Facts About Tom Cotton, Trump’s Likely Pick for CIA – U.S. News & World Report
White House readies plan to replace Tillerson with Pompeo at State, install Cotton at CIA

 

Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks
Sen. Cotton – Google Search
 

mikenova shared this story from Sen. Cotton – Google News.

Story image for Sen. Cotton from Arkansas Online

Seat in Senate in play if Cotton goes to CIA

Arkansas Online3 hours ago
WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is weighing whether to make U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton the next director of the Central Intelligence Agency, The New York Times and The Washington Post reported Thursday. Both stories relied on statements from unnamed administration officials. In Arkansas …
New York Times Report: Senator Tom Cotton Could Be Named CIA …
<a href=”http://5newsonline.com” rel=”nofollow”>5newsonline.com</a>20 hours ago
White House Plans Tillerson Ouster From State Dept., to Be …
Highly CitedNew York Times11 hours ago
Who is Tom Cotton?
Featured4029tv19 hours ago
Do Not Let Tom Cotton Anywhere Near the CIA
In-DepthSlate Magazine15 hours ago

Media image for Sen. Cotton from 5newsonline.com

5newsonline.com

Media image for Sen. Cotton from Washington Post

Washington Post

Media image for Sen. Cotton from Newsweek

Newsweek

Media image for Sen. Cotton from Slate Magazine

Slate Magazine

Media image for Sen. Cotton from Business Insider

Business Insider

Media image for Sen. Cotton from Power Line (blog)

Power Line (blog)
Alex Younger – Google Search
 

mikenova shared this story from Alex Younger – Google News.

MI6 lays bare the growing Russian threat

The Times12 hours ago
This speaker — recognised by many in the audience as Alex Younger, the head of MI6 — told Nato ambassadors that the Kremlin “exemplified” the modern threats faced by this country and its allies. Russia’s aim was to divide the West, sowing uncertainty and ambiguity. Familiar boundaries had become …
MI6 lays bare the growing Russian threat – The Times – Google Search
 

mikenova shared this story from MI6 lays bare the growing Russian threat – The Times – Google News.

MI6 lays bare the growing Russian threat

The Times12 hours ago
This speaker — recognised by many in the audience as Alex Younger, the head of MI6 — told Nato ambassadors that the Kremlin “exemplified” the modern threats faced by this country and its allies. Russia’s aim was to di