1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (198 sites): Politics: After subpoena threat, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen to appear before House panel

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Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) said last week that was “outrageous” that the Trump Cabinet member had not agreed to testify.

Politics

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (198 sites)


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1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (198 sites): “2016 elections and mental health” – Google News: Meet the ‘Generation Under Fire: Guns, Safety & Rights’ panel – WKMG News 6 & ClickOrlando

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Meet the ‘Generation Under Fire: Guns, Safety & Rights’ panel  WKMG News 6 & ClickOrlando

Meet the eight experts who will take part in the panel discussion during News 6’s “Generation Under Fire: Guns, Safety & Rights” special on Feb. 11.

“2016 elections and mental health” – Google News

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (198 sites)


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1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (198 sites): “trump authoritarianism” – Google News: World to come / The world to come – newagebd.net

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World to come / The world to come  newagebd.net

THE ruling elites are painfully aware that the foundations of American power are rotting. The outsourcing of manufacturing in the United States and the plunging …

“trump authoritarianism” – Google News

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (198 sites)


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Ex-CIA head of Russian operations blasts Trump for damaging ‘morale in the US intelligence community’: His ‘actions are making us all less safe’ – Alternet.org

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Putin and Trump/Screengrab

President Donald Trump’s already-tense relationship with his own intelligence officials has deteriorated in recent weeks, with Trump going out of his way to attack their judgment. And as former CIA…

President Donald Trump’s already-tense relationship with his own intelligence officials has deteriorated in recent weeks, with Trump going out of his way to attack their judgment.

And as former CIA official Stephen Hall writes in the Washington Post, this could have serious consequences including a loss of talent in the intelligence community, erosion of credibility with foreign governments, and an increased risk to national security.

“Inside the CIA (and, I would imagine, also in other intelligence agencies), there is a well-respected tradition of encouraging the workforce to ignore politics,” says Hall. “CIA officers are not hired or fired for their political beliefs, but rather for their competence and, in the case of more junior officers, their potential. Integrity is the key factor in hiring and retention; I never saw a case where personal politics played a role in hiring or firing. Nor did I ever witness politics playing a role in operational or analytical decisions. For decades, CIA leaders as well as front-line managers have counseled patience, suggesting that officers don professional blinders when it comes to public pronouncements regarding the arcane work of intelligence.”

The problem, as Hall sees it, is that when the President of the United States calls his own CIA and FBI directors, and his own Director of National Intelligence, “passive and naive” people who should “go back to school” because their Worldwide Threat Assessment disagrees with him on the Iran nuclear deal, North Korea, and border security, that can make it hard for intelligence officers to do their work in a nonpartisan vacuum. Because, as he puts it, “the Holy Grail of intelligence professionals is knowing that the information they helped collect, analyze and disseminate went straight to the president, the commander — and intelligence consumer — in chief,” but now they know their findings could be ignored, dismissed, or publicly scorned by him if it doesn’t suit his narrative.

“I am not predicting a mass exodus of intelligence officers from federal service,” Hall continues. Intelligence work is some of the most fascinating, complex and rewarding work that our government does, and its practitioners are dedicated and thick-skinned. But they’re not used to sophomoric public criticism from an impulsive, angry president, and they may eventually decide that it’s just not worth it.”

Another consequence, Hall warns, could be that foreign intelligence services will be less willing to collaborate with ours.

“Trump’s inappropriate public criticisms will also have a chilling effect on one of the United States’ most potent intelligence force multipliers: our relationships with allied foreign intelligence agencies,” he says. “Indeed, the president’s comments are uniquely self-defeating, in that our best hope for monitoring and perhaps modifying the behavior of rogue states such as Iran, North Korea and Russia is working in unison with our partners. Many have already taken note of Trump’s cavalier attitude toward sensitive information, as well as his apparent failure to understand the basic rules of intelligence sharing. Recall when our president shared sensitive intelligence obtained from one of our foreign partners with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, for example. I would be deeply surprised if many of our best intelligence allies were not already holding back information they would normally pass to their U.S. counterparts, for fear Trump might not be able to keep a secret. (Their concerns might even be darker when they consider the possibility that our president has reportedly discussed sensitive matters with Russian President Vladimir Putin behind closed doors with no record of the conversation).”

The effect of all of this, says Hall, is that our intelligence services will not work as effectively, and our country’s ability to counter threats will suffer.

“[W]e are well past the point where we can write off the president’s public criticisms of the intelligence community as those of a political outsider, who despite his constant missteps has a heart of gold and the best of intentions,” Hall concludes. “We are now at the point where Trump’s actions are making us all less safe.”


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“Russian Intelligence services” – Google News: Ex-CIA head of Russian operations blasts Trump for damaging ‘morale in the US intelligence community’: His ‘actions are making us all less safe’ – AlterNet

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Ex-CIA head of Russian operations blasts Trump for damaging ‘morale in the US intelligence community’: His ‘actions are making us all less safe’  AlterNet

President Donald Trump’s already-tense relationship with his own intelligence officials has deteriorated in recent weeks, with Trump going out of his way to …

“Russian Intelligence services” – Google News


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Donald Trump | The Guardian: State of the Union one day away as next government shutdown looms – live

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We are eleven days away from another potential government shutdown and three days into the political crisis in Virginia

A second top Democratic candidate has thrown his hat into the ring to challenge incumbent Republican Senator Cory Gardner in 2020.

Andrew Romanoff, a former Speaker of the State House, who mounted an unsuccessful campaigns for U.S. Senate in 2010 and for Congress in 2014, is poised to announce a campaign.

Andrew Romanoff set to challenge Cory Gardner for US Senate | https://t.co/reqO62R4fJ https://t.co/L2RI8RJAZg

Former vice president Joe Biden is still on the fence about a presidential bid, telling people “I’m 70 percent there, but I’m not all the way there.”

The Atlantic reports Biden is taking many of the steps necessary to mount a campaign but is still hesitating about a run.

Top positions for a campaign have been sketched out. Donor outreach has accelerated, with Biden himself telling staff at some events to write down the names of people who say they’re eager to help. A list of potential “day-one endorsers” among elected officials has been prepared. Basic staff outreach is happening. Biden has even joked to people that he’s upped his daily workout to get in shape.

“I have been told that if it happens, I need to be ready to go with a moment’s notice,” said one person who’s been in conversations with Biden’s top aides.

Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton will publish his first book in May, another step forward for a rising star in the Republican Party.

An veteran with undergraduate and law degrees from Harvard, Cotton’s book will chronicle the Old Guard, the oldest active duty regiment in the Army which serves ceremonial functions. Cotton served in the unit for over a year.

The apolitical “Sacred Duty: A Soldier’s Tour at Arlington National Cemetery” will showcase Cotton’s service in the military, rather than the hard-edged conservatism that many Republicans believe the first-term Arkansan will eventually try to use to run for president. One of the youngest senators and someone who is close to President Donald Trump, the hawkish 41-year-old Republican is still subject to regular buzz about serving in the Cabinet or eventually running for the president. He’s also up for reelection next year, though his seat is presumably safe in red Arkansas.

Cotton received more than $500,000 in advance for the book, according to a source close to him.

Good morning,

We are one day away from the State of the Union, eleven days away from another potential government shutdown and three days into the political crisis in Virginia sparked the discovery of a racist picture on the yearbook page of the state’s Democratic governor, Ralph Northam.

Continue reading…

Donald Trump | The Guardian


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If you know yourself and if you know your enemy… – 10:54 AM 2/4/2019

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Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
from Trump Investigations.

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