Palmer Report: Donald Trump just made it easier for Senate Republicans to dump him

  • 3
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3
    Shares


Donald Trump is clearly skilled enough at con artistry to cheat his way through an election and steal the presidency. But as good as he is at the whole fraud thing, he’s just as good at sabotaging himself by saying or doing the dumbest thing possible at the worst possible time for him. We just saw a prime example of that when Trump abruptly turned what had been a comparatively quiet news day into a flaming toxic waste dump.

Donald Trump’s SAT scores were so embarrassingly low that he made threats against anyone who might have been tempted to release them publicly, but we suspect that even Trump has just enough brain cells to count to twenty. That’s the number of Senate Republicans who would have to go along with impeachment, if it’s going to result in his ouster.

When it comes to the GOP we’re talking about a bunch of corrupt wishy-washy cowards, of course. But they’ve spent the past week voting against Trump in increasing numbers, because they’re getting the sense that his criminal scandals are going to take him down, and they don’t want to go down with him.

The key number is twelve, because that’s how many GOP Senators just voted against Trump on what he considers his most crucial issue, his national emergency border wall stunt. It was four last week, and now it’s twelve, so it could be even higher by the time this comes back for a veto override vote. If and when it does reach twenty, it’s time for Trump to panic. If twenty Senate Republicans are willing to vote to kill Trump’s wall fantasy, then they’re probably willing to vote to remove him from office if they conclude that it’s what’s selfishly best for their own Senate reelection chances.


In other words, with these weakling Senate Republicans now holding Donald Trump’s fate in their quivering hands, it would be really smart of Trump to try to make nice with them, and to throw them a bone. After all, they’re more likely to keep him around longer if they think they can get a bit more usefulness out of him.



So what did Donald Trump do in furtherance of this goal? He launched a vicious Twitter attack today on the late John McCain. Someone mentioned McCain on Fox News, and Trump was watching, and he just couldn’t help himself. Trump has attacked McCain before and gotten away with it, but that was back when he still had leverage over the Republican Party. These days it’s the opposite. Trump needs the GOP Senate’s help to survive, and now he’s attacking the patron saint of the GOP Senate.




It’s not that any Republican Senators are saying to themselves, “You know what? I was going to stick with Donald Trump, but now that he’s insulted John McCain, I’m too offended to stick with him.” They don’t operate that way. But they do operate this way: “I’ve been looking for an excuse to vote against Trump’s survival, and I’ve been afraid of taking too much heat for it, but now that he’s attacked GOP war hero McCain, I can opportunistically sell that to my constituents as the reason I had to finally turn against him.”


It’s not even that the GOP Senate will use this now. They’ll stick it in their back pocket, for when Robert Mueller’s report comes out and fully exposes Donald Trump for the criminal and traitor he is, and the inevitable impeachment movement begins. At whatever point these Republican Senators selfishly calculate that it’s in their best interest to throw Trump to the SDNY wolves, whether it’s weeks or months from now, they’ll start making a big deal out of the fact that Trump attacked McCain today. Trump just made it so much easier for the GOP to dunk him once it finally decides to.

Donate to the New Zealand Mosque victims and families



The post Donald Trump just made it easier for Senate Republicans to dump him appeared first on Palmer Report.

Palmer Report


  • 3
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3
    Shares
  •  
    3
    Shares
  •  
  • 3
  •  

Trump digital operations from Michael_Novakhov (2 sites): “Trump digital operations” – Google News: CISOs: You need to manage by ‘walking around’ – VentureBeat

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

CISOs: You need to manage by ‘walking around’  VentureBeat

Chief information security officers (CISOs) today have replaced chief information officers (CIOs) as the most under-valued C-level executives. In fact, according to …

“Trump digital operations” – Google News

Trump digital operations from Michael_Novakhov (2 sites)


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3
    Shares
  •  
  • 3
  •  

“trump criminal investigation” – Google News: Man will be charged in killing of reputed Gambino crime boss Francesco ‘Frank’ Cali, New York police say – CNN

  • 3
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3
    Shares

Man will be charged in killing of reputed Gambino crime boss Francesco ‘Frank’ Cali, New York police say  CNN

A 24-year-old man has been taken into custody in connection with the shooting death of reputed New York crime boss Francesco “Frank” Cali, the New York …

“trump criminal investigation” – Google News


  • 3
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3
    Shares
  •  
    3
    Shares
  •  
  • 3
  •  

Cambridge Analytica from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites): “cambridge analytica” – Google News: Monki’s Lazy Loop sustainable denim line: Why shopping ethical and eco-friendly fashion is still so hard – Buro 24/7 Singapore

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Monki’s Lazy Loop sustainable denim line: Why shopping ethical and eco-friendly fashion is still so hard  Buro 24/7 Singapore

Monki’s Lazy Loop sustainable denim program, introduced late last year, is a comprehensive effort to make fast fashion sustainable. The H&M-owned brand’s …

“cambridge analytica” – Google News

Cambridge Analytica from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites)


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3
    Shares
  •  
  • 3
  •  

“Putin and American political process” – Google News: It’s Time to Attack White Nationalism for the Terror Group it Is – The Daily Beast

  • 3
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3
    Shares

It’s Time to Attack White Nationalism for the Terror Group it Is  The Daily Beast

Nobody can claim as the George W. Bush did that ‘we’re going to fight them over there so we don’t have to fight them here’ because they’re already ‘here’ with a …

“Putin and American political process” – Google News


  • 3
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3
    Shares
  •  
    3
    Shares
  •  
  • 3
  •  

1. Trump Circles: Elections from Michael_Novakhov (16 sites): “roger stone” – Google News: Some Say Randy Credicio Helped Steal the Presidency. I Stole His Book. – Daily Beast

  • 3
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3
    Shares

Some Say Randy Credicio Helped Steal the Presidency. I Stole His Book.  Daily Beast

Whether you’re stealing Larry David’s cigars or Randy Credico’s book, or taking shady jobs on behalf in *service* of of Roger Stone, we all have things to be …

“roger stone” – Google News

1. Trump Circles: Elections from Michael_Novakhov (16 sites)


  • 3
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3
    Shares
  •  
    3
    Shares
  •  
  • 3
  •  

Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠: Academic in Cambridge Analytica data mining sues Facebook for defamation

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  


Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
.

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.

By Anna Schecter

Aleksandr Kogan, the academic who mined Facebook for the data firm linked to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, Cambridge Analytica, filed a defamation suit against the social network Friday before the statute of limitations would have run out.

It was a Friday night exactly one year ago when Facebook “tried to get ahead of the Cambridge Analytica story,” in Kogan’s words, and issued a statement accusing him of deceiving the company when he developed his app in 2014, allowing him to collect Facebook data for Cambridge Analytica, the U.K.-based data firm that worked on Trump’s campaign.

Kogan told NBC News that he had been waiting on investigations by the Department of Justice, the Security and Exchange Commission and the Federal Election Commission of the Cambridge Analytica scandal to wrap up before filing, but the statute of limitations “forced our hand.” News of the lawsuit was first reported by the New York Times.

“Certainly my preference was to not file before the government investigations had concluded. That’s why we didn’t file this thing six months ago. We had no choice but to file Friday,” Kogan said Saturday in a phone interview.

Kogan, who currently works at a tech firm in Buffalo, New York, has maintained for months that his app that mined Facebook user profile data and the data of friends who downloaded his app was standard operating procedure for hundreds if not thousands of apps.

He has told NBC News that he had a working relationship with Facebook until the Cambridge Analytica scandal brought bad press to the company.

“This is a frivolous lawsuit from someone who recklessly violated our policies and put people’s data at risk,” Facebook spokesman Andy Stone said Saturday.

Kogan’s lawyer, Steven Cohen, said Facebook found “a convenient scapegoat” in Kogan.

“They accused him of being a liar and a fraud and they knew that wasn’t the truth and that’s the standard for defamation for a public person,” Cohen said. “Alex Kogan was clearly not a public figure, rather he was thrust into the limelight by Facebook’s defamation.”

Cohen said Facebook strategically referred to Kogan as a “Russian American” in its statement.

“They were reacting to all the negative publicity they posed for allowing Russian trolls to post fake news on Facebook and they found a convenient scapegoat in Alex Kogan.”

Kogan says he gave Facebook the terms of service of his app, and he gave every user the terms of service, and he has acknowledged in past interviews that few people read the fine print, and terms of service should be more user friendly.

“He did not deceive Facebook. He complied with what they told him to comply with,” Cohen said. “In the meantime, he has lost jobs, investors, consulting agreements and his good name. We want nothing more than to put this in front of a jury.”

Anna Schecter is a producer for the investigations unit of NBC News.

Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3
    Shares
  •  
  • 3
  •  

Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠: Facebook Accused Of Cambridge Analytica ‘Cover-up’ As Criminal Prosecutors Investigate

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  


Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
.

The worst week in Facebook’s history showed no signs of letting up this weekend, with fresh accusations in the Observer of an executive-level cover-up of the company’s involvement in Cambridge Analytica’s data harvesting as well as news that the academic behind the scheme, Aleksandr Kogan, is suing the social media giant for defamation, for faking ignorance and for using him as a scapegoat when they were aware of events all along.

In the last week, the company has suffered its largest technical outage, endured revelations of a grand jury investigation in New York into the trading of should-be private user data with other technology companies, witnessed the tragic right-wing shooting in New Zealand live-streamed on its network, overseen the departures of chief product officer Chris Cox and head of WhatsApp Chris Daniels and caused a major own-goal by removing presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren’s campaign ads after she announced a proposal to break up the company.

Some week, even for Facebook. And there’s still the likelihood of that multi-billion-dollar FTC fine to come.

As I wrote on Thursday, the super-outage coinciding with headlines of a New York grand jury investigation is an unfortunate coincidence, but an apt one. The omens for regulation of social media’s apparent license to roam freely around the world and across billions of users are now there for all to see.

The Cambridge Analytica scandal, “the story of how whistleblower Christopher Wylie built media mogul Steve Bannon’s ‘psychological warfare tool’ by harvesting millions of people’s Facebook profiles”, marked a sea change for Facebook’s image. This weekend is the 12-month anniversary of that news, and it’s a year that seemingly keeps getting worse and from which Facebook and its CEO Mark Zuckerberg can’t find any respite.

The dominos begin falling

Facebook has consistently blamed Aleksandr Kogan for the Cambridge Analytica scandal, admitting their own culpability for lapse governance but not for knowing what was actually taking place. The academic used Facebook’s third-party data-sharing tools to invite 300,000 users to play games, which in turn opened up access to their 87 million friends. That is the data at the heart of the scandal. Data that was mined, allegedly with overseas (read Russian) interference to help shape electoral intentions in various campaigns, most notably Trump and Brexit.

Commenting on Aleksandr Kogan’s suit, his lawyer Steve Cohen said that “Alex did not lie, Alex was not a fraud, Alex did not deceive them, this was not a scam. Facebook knew exactly what this app was doing, or should have known. Facebook desperately needed a scapegoat, and Alex was their scapegoat.”

Kogan claims that Facebook sought to scapegoat him, despite being aware of what was going on throughout. Facebook has maintained that they were led to believe the data being harvested was for academic purposes only, and not for use as a data-driven exercise in political manipulation. When they found out the data had been passed on by Kogan, they sought its deletion and severed the relationship. This was long before the Trump campaign and its ‘Defeat Crooked Hilary’ videos on Facebook.

Responding to the latest news, a Facebook spokesperson dismissed Kogan’s lawsuit as “frivolous” and the academic as a person “who violated our policies and put people’s data at risk.”

But there’s more

On Saturday, the Observer went further than Kogan, claiming that Facebook executives had insight into what Cambridge Analytica was planning in 2016, as the firm began its work for the Trump campaign, facts that will be in evidence “as federal prosecutors investigate claims that the social media giant has covered up the extent of its relationship with the firm.”

The claims center on an alleged meeting between Facebook board member Marc Andreessen and the Cambridge Analytica whistleblower Christopher Wylie, two years before he came forward to the press. “Individuals who attended the meeting with Wylie and Andreessen claim it was set up to learn what Cambridge Analytica was doing with Facebook’s data and how technologists could work to ‘fix’ it.”

A year ago, Zuckerberg claimed in a blog post that “last week we learned from the Guardian, the New York Times and Channel 4 that Cambridge Analytica may not have deleted the data as they had certified.” The latest allegations materially refute that claim.

The Observer article quotes ‘a Silicon Valley technologist’ with knowledge of the meeting saying: “There were people who were very concerned by the reports of what Cambridge Analytica was doing with data, and the meeting was set up to try and find out as much about the exploit as possible in order to figure out possible solutions. That’s why Wylie was invited. They wanted his knowledge. He was asked a lot of questions including about the company’s contacts with Russian entities.”

If the new allegations are true, it is “a hugely embarrassing revelation for Facebook, which was revealed last week to be the subject of a criminal investigation into whether it had covered up the extent of its involvement with Cambridge Analytica.”

The Observer reports that Facebook declined to answer any questions about their claims.

Regulation looms

Before the weekend, with news of a grand jury investigation into the casual sale of users’ privacy, it was clear that the case for regulation if not the break-up of the social media giants is now uncontestable.

A year ago, before these latest allegations came to light, the Observer commented: “What the Cambridge Analytica story exposed, by accident, from Facebook’s reaction in the months that followed, is the absolute power of the tech giants. Power and unaccountability that is the foundational platform on which populist authoritarians are rising to power all across the globe. Power and unaccountability that continues unchecked.”

The hard truth is that what was known 12-months ago only scratched the surface of what we have discovered since. The honeymoon we have all enjoyed with social media is now so badly tarnished it dominates the headlines week after week. And it has become a major political issue around the world, which will undoubtedly find its way into many more campaigns and manifestos that Senator Warren’s alone.

In making her case for the break-up of Big Tech, the Senator said “today’s big tech companies have too much power — too much power over our economy, our society, and our democracy. They’ve bulldozed competition, used our private information for profit, and tilted the playing field against everyone else. And in the process, they have hurt small businesses and stifled innovation.”

It’s hard to argue.

Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3
    Shares
  •  
  • 3
  •