1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): Palmer Report: Donald Trump’s new oddly specific denial about the Mueller report gives something away

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Donald Trump went berserk today, which isn’t surprising, because he tends to do that on days that end with a “y.” But when Trump went off the deep end today about the Mueller report, he made an oddly specific denial that shouldn’t be overlooked – because he gave away something in the process.



Here’s part of what Donald Trump tweeted, and see if you can spot the big giveaway: “I have not read the Mueller Report yet, even though I have every right to do so. Only know the conclusions, and on the big one, No Collusion. Likewise, recommendations made to our great A.G. who found No Obstruction.” Yeah that’s right, even though no one has been asking Trump if he’s already read the report, he just preemptively claimed he hasn’t read it – and whenever he does this kind of thing, he’s lying.



The tricky part is figuring out precisely what Trump is lying about here. Do we think he’s read the entire Mueller report, which is reported to be in the neighborhood of four hundred pages? Of course not. This is a guy who, by all accounts, can’t focus long enough to read a two page briefing memo. But because the liar-in-chief is claiming not to know the details of the report, it means that someone has told him something about the details – and that’s significant.


Does this mean that William Barr has given the entire Mueller report to Donald Trump’s handlers, who have turned around and briefed Trump on it? If so, that’s felony obstruction of justice on Barr’s part. It also raises the question of whether Trump’s handlers gave him the ugly truth about how screwed he is, or misleadingly told him that he was off the hook so he wouldn’t completely fall to pieces. In any case, thanks to Trump’s mouth, we now know that Trump and Barr are conspiring in some way when it comes to the contents of the report – and that could be an even bigger criminal scandal than what’s in the report.



The post Donald Trump’s new oddly specific denial about the Mueller report gives something away appeared first on Palmer Report.

Palmer Report

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites)


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1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): “analysis of trump electorate” – Google News: Democrats Lining Up To Try To Take On President Donald Trump – OpEd – Eurasia Review

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Democrats Lining Up To Try To Take On President Donald Trump – OpEd  Eurasia Review

By Radwan Jakeem. After months of speculation about who might run for president in 2020, the Democratic field appears to be set. That doesn’t mean there …

“analysis of trump electorate” – Google News

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites)


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“Mueller Report” – Google News: Cass R. Sunstein: Here’s a guide to releasing the Mueller report – Akron Beacon Journal

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Cass R. Sunstein: Here’s a guide to releasing the Mueller report  Akron Beacon Journal

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — The controversy over the delayed release of Robert Mueller’s report, including the nature and extent of the redactions, raises large …

“Mueller Report” – Google News


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Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠: Political Criminology – The Outline

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Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
from The Trump Investigations Blog by Michael Novakhov – Review Of News And Opinions.

Political Criminology – The Outline


Image result for Michael Novakhov on Political Criminology
FBI News Review

Global Security News | The World News and Times – Information Management Service: Current World News | Reviews of media reports | Selected reading lists …

Political Criminology is based on the case study approach rather than the statistical studies. It is essentially the InterpretativeHermeneuticPsychodynamicPsychoanalytic Criminology and its working fields are the Psychoanalysis (broadly: all and any school) of History, Culture, and of Historical Personalities, in their Political and Historical rather than Clinical or Forensic context. It is closely related to the fields of: Political Science, Psychology, Psychiatry, General Criminology, Political Psychology, Psychohistory, Detective Work, and Law.  

Michael Novakhov – 2:33 PM 4/6/2019

Links
Approaches in Political Criminology

Personology Studies in Political Criminology 
  • Political Personology 
  • Historical Personology 
  • Clinical  Personology 
  • Forensic Personology 
as the historical case  study in Political Criminology 
  • The New Abwehr (German Military Intelligence) Hypothetical Operations after WW2 
  • “Dusseldorf Karnival Cycle”
  • Trump 
  • 9/11 
  • Other previous operations
  • Red Scare of the early 1950-s 
  • Cuban Missile Crisis and the Kennedy Assassination of 1963 
  • Nixon and the Deep Throat, etc., etc. 
  • As the historical case  studies in Political Criminology 
  • Other cases
________________________________ 

Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠


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1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): Palmer Report: Donald Trump is hiding behind Door #36

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Just for kicks, take a moment to read this particularly deranged passage written by Charles Manson: “And it’s a wall — not a good-looking wall. It’s a wall. It’s got 36 doors in it. Big doors. Very big doors. And they never put the doors on. So it’s 38 miles with 36 doors that you can drive a truck through. There’s only one problem: They never put the doors on it. So we’re putting the doors on it. Or, even better, maybe not putting any doors. I said, ‘Maybe you do it without the doors.’ Because putting the doors on cost most than the property is worth. I’d rather give the money for the property and just say, “Bye-bye,” or sell it to somebody on the other side.”



Nah, just kidding, that word salad didn’t come from Charles Manson. Instead, the above words were spoken yesterday by the President of the United States. These are actual words spoken by Donald Trump. This is the kind of quote that’s so far over the top, so far removed from reality, and so revealing about the mental state of the person who spoke it, we’d almost be inclined to believe it was made-up, if not for the fact that the Trump regime posted a transcript of it on the official White House website.



Does anyone even care to try to guess what this bloviating buffoon might be talking about here? First of all, there is no wall. Donald Trump is still pretending that existing stretches of fence are a wall, or that he’s building a wall, or that the wall has already been built, or some other fantasy depending on what his mood might be. Second, doors? Doors? Really? What?


Donald Trump just finished telling us three times in the span of a minute that he wanted to know the “oranges” of the Mueller probe. He thinks the CEO of Apple is Tim Apple. And now he thinks there’s an imaginary wall that’s been ruined by thirty-six doors, but the doors don’t exist so he’s going to put the doors on, or he’s going to sell some property on the other side of his imaginary wall so he doesn’t have to put the doors on. In Trump’s fully broken brain, these doors both exist and do not exist. When he said “Bye-bye,” he was surely talking about his own mental competence, because it’s gone.



The post Donald Trump is hiding behind Door #36 appeared first on Palmer Report.

Palmer Report

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites)


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“trump putin” – Google News: Meet Alexander Ovechkin, the ice hockey star loved by Washington, Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin – ABC News

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Meet Alexander Ovechkin, the ice hockey star loved by Washington, Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin  ABC News

Is it weird that the best ice hockey player in the US capital is a close ally and supporter of Russia’s President Vladimir Putin? Washington DC doesn’t seem to …

“trump putin” – Google News


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1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): Just Security: Barr the Redactor?

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In his March 29 letter, Attorney General William Barr informed the Chairs of the congressional Judiciary Committees that the report Special Counsel Robert Mueller delivered to Barr last month “is nearly 400 pages long (exclusive of tables and appendices) and sets forth the Special Counsel’s findings, his analysis, and the reasons for his conclusions.”  Barr also promised that “[e]veryone will soon be able to read [the Mueller report] on their own,“ because he will provide it to Congress by mid-April, if not earlier — in other words, probably by the end of this coming week.

In each of his recent letters regarding the Mueller report Barr has made reference to a DOJ process of making redactions before the report can be shared with Congress. (In the March 29 letter, for instance, Barr stressed that “we” are “preparing the report for release, making the redactions that are required.”)  This has led many observers to worry that the version of the report Barr delivers to Congress in the next few days will be woefully incomplete, and won’t adequately convey Mueller’s findings and analysis.

Perhaps.  But there are at least three reasons to believe — or at least to hope — that the version of the report Barr gives Congress will not include many material redactions, and that those Barr does make will not significantly affect Congress’s and the public’s ability to fully understand and assess the results of Mueller’s investigation.

First, Barr has repeatedly committed himself to the greatest possible degree of transparency — which is as it should be, because the whole point of the AG notification requirement in the DOJ regulations is to address “[t]he interests of the public in being informed of and understanding the reasons for the actions of the Special Counsel,” and “[t]o help ensure congressional and public confidence in the integrity of the process.”

In his initial letter notifying Congress of Special Counsel Mueller’s report, Barr stated that he is “committed to as much transparency as possible” with respect to that report.  This was in keeping with Barr’s promise to senators in connection with his confirmation hearing that because “it is very important that the public and Congress be informed of the results of the Special Counsel’s work … my goal will be to provide as much transparency as I can consistent with the law, including the [Special Counsel] regulations, and the Department’s longstanding practices and policies.”  Barr repeated this promise in his March 24 letter to the Judiciary Committees:  Because of “the public interest in this matter,” Barr wrote,” “my goal and intent is to release as much of the Special Counsel’s report as I can consistent with applicable law, regulations, and Departmental policies.”  And in his opening statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee in January, Barr offered the unequivocal statement that “I can assure you that, where judgments are to be made by me [about how to release the Mueller report], I will make those judgments based solely on the law and will let no personal, political, or other improper interests influence my decision.”  Barr has thus established a very demanding standard for his decisions here, one that presumably he’d be loath to disregard.

Second, in his March 29 letter Barr disclosed that Mueller himself “is assisting us in this process” of preparing the report for disclosure.  I think it’s fair to assume that Mueller wrote the report with an eye to allowing the greatest possible transparency to Congress and the public.  If that’s right, then Mueller presumably is urging DOJ to redact as little as possible, and internally arguing, where appropriate, that major redactions are not necessary.  Barr is unlikely to reject Mueller’s recommendations and legal views absent very compelling counterarguments.

Third, when it comes to the “merits,” neither the law nor DOJ “policies and practices” ought to require extensive redactions of the Mueller report, particularly not with respect to those aspects of the report discussing President Trump and other government officials.  To be sure, it’s possible that some citations to particular evidence might have to be excluded — at least in any version of the report that is released to the public — but it’s not obvious that such citations would preclude Barr from retaining all or virtually all of Mueller’s conclusions and analysis, at least in the version of the report that he submits to Congress.

In the remainder of this post, I’ll offer some tentative thoughts on the four categories of materials Barr has identified as possibly warranting redactions. The first two of those categories — grand jury matters and classified information — arguably implicate certain legal constraints, whereas the latter two — “[m]aterial that could affect other ongoing matters, including those that the Special Counsel has referred to other Department offices” and “[i]nformation that would unduly infringe on the personal privacy and reputational interests of peripheral third parties” — arguably implicate DOJ policies and practices.

Legal Constraints

The law shouldn’t be much of a barrier to robust disclosure to Congress, with two possible, but probably fairly minor, exceptions.

1.  “Matters occurring before the grand jury”

The Justice Department has announced that each of the pages of Mueller’s report contains the warning “May Contain Material Protected Under Fed. R. Crim. P.6(e),” and Barr informed Congress that Mueller “issued more than 2,800 subpoenas,” presumably most if not all of which were formally issued by a grand jury.  Therefore it’s not surprising that in his letters to Congress, Barr has repeatedly referred to grand jury information as the primary category of information that he’s busy redacting from the Mueller report.

Rule 6(e)(2)(B) of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure prohibits a government attorney, such as Barr or Mueller, from “disclos[ing]” “a matter occurring before the grand jury,” unless the Rules of Criminal Procedure provide otherwise.

Therefore Barr — with Mueller’s assistance — must now be asking two questions: (i) which portions of the Mueller report, if any, would “disclose a matter occurring before the grand jury”? and (ii) whether there are any exceptions that might nevertheless permit such disclosure, at least to members of certain congressional committees.

a.  Coverage of “matters occurring before the grand jury” under Rule 6(e)

How much of the Mueller report might “disclose a matter occurring before the grand jury”?  Probably much less than many people are assuming.

For starters, as Ryan Goodman and Andy Wright wrote here back in February, it’s entirely possible that significant parts of Mueller’s investigation — including perhaps the part focused on President Trump’s potential “obstruction of justice” and other actions undertaken while he’s been in office — occurred outside the aegis of the grand jury, in which case Rule 6(e) would not affect the portions of the report discussing those aspects of the investigation.

OK, but what about evidence that was presented to the grand jury, or that Mueller obtained pursuant to a grand jury subpoena?

Rule 6 does not itself define the phrase “a matter occurring before the grand jury,” nor explain what it means to “disclose” such a matter.  Generally speaking, courts have read Rule 6(e) to prohibit any discussion or revelation by a covered attorney that would reveal to the audience what actually took place in the grand jury room.  Obviously, then, an attorney generally may not disseminate transcripts of grand jury proceedings; documents marked as “summaries” of such proceedings; descriptions of the grand jurors’ deliberations or questions; or information that expressly identifies the grand jurors or that specifies persons as having been grand jury witnesses or “targets.”

However, the mere fact that information has been presented to the grand jury, or that a document has been considered or subpoenaed by a grand jury, does not in and of itself trigger Rule 6(e)’s confidentiality requirement. As the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit has repeatedly emphasized, “Rule 6(e) does not ‘draw ‘a veil of secrecy … over all matters occurring in the world that happen to be investigated by a grand jury.’”  Labow v. DOJ, 831 F.3d 523, 529 (D.C. Cir. 2016) (quoting Senate of Puerto Rico v. DOJ, 823 F.2d 574, 582 (D.C. Cir. 1987), in turn quoting SEC v. Dresser Indus. Inc., 628 F.2d 1368, 1382 (D.C. Cir. 1980) (en banc)); see also Bartko v. DOJ, 898 F.3d 51, 73 (D.C. Cir. 2018).

The “touchstone” for triggering Rule 6(e)(2)(B) is, instead, “whether the information sought would reveal something about the grand jury’s identity, investigation, or deliberation.”  Labow, 831 F.3d at 529; accord Bartko, 898 F.3d at 73.

A government attorney therefore may, for example, disclose a document subpoenaed by a grand jury, or describe or cite to such a document, as long as he or she does so in a manner that doesn’t reveal that a grand jury subpoenaed or considered that document.

It’s quite possible that most of the evidence discussed in the Mueller report can be disclosed — or can at a minimum be cited as support for Mueller’s findings — without revealing whether a grand jury subpoenaed or considered it.  And where that’s the case, Rule 6(e) does not require a redaction.

It’s important, in this regard, that Barr be careful not to redact information from the Mueller report he submits to Congress in the coming days on the mistaken ground that it was merely considered (or subpoenaed) by the grand jury, because if he does so the redactions themselves could reveal what otherwise might not have been apparent — namely, that the grand jury considered the evidence — if and when DOJ or a court later concludes that the material was not covered by Rule 6(e) and the information is “belatedly released” (Labow, 831 F.3d at 530).  Such a mistake in the first instance might not bar later disclosure as a matter of law.  See id. (“Of course, if the documents are now belatedly released, it might be apparent that they had been subpoenaed by a grand jury given that the potential connection with a grand jury is now known. That fact, however, should not bar disclosure.”)  Even so, it would result in an unnecessary breach of grand jury confidentiality — a compelling reason for Barr not to err on the side of assuming Rule 6(e)’s application in cases where it does not clearly apply.

b. The Rule 6(e)(3)(D) exception

Even if some of the information in the Mueller report is covered by Rule 6(e), and thus Barr can’t disclose it to the public, it’s possible that Barr can nevertheless disclose such information to at least the members of certain congressional committees, pursuant to one of the exceptions in Rule 6(e) itself.

The second sentence of Rule 6(e)(3)(D) — an exception Congress added in 2004 — provides that “[a]n attorney for the government may … disclose any grand-jury matter involving, within the United States or elsewhere, a threat of attack or other grave hostile acts of a foreign power or its agent, a threat of domestic or international sabotage or terrorism, or clandestine intelligence gathering activities by an intelligence service or network of a foreign power or by its agent, to any appropriate federal, state, state subdivision, Indian tribal, or foreign government official, for the purpose of preventing or responding to such threat or activities.”

As far as I know there are no judicial decisions discussing who counts as an “appropriate” federal official under this exception.  Based upon its plain words, however, the exception would appear to comfortably cover the members of the congressional intelligence committees, at a minimum (as well as the Senate and House leadership who are part of the so-called “Gang of Eight”), whose functions certainly include evaluating how the U.S. should “prevent[] or respond[] to” Russia’s “grave hostile threats.”  It might also cover, e.g., the members of the judiciary and foreign affairs committees, assuming that they, too, are working to prevent or respond to the Russian threats.

If this reading is correct, then Barr can include “matter[s] occurring before the grand jury” in the version of the Mueller report he conveys to some congressional committees, even if (perhaps) not to the rest of Congress.  If he does so, however, the members of those committees would not be free to disclose the “matter[s] occurring before the grand jury” to the public, because Rule 6 expressly provides that “[a]ny official who receives information under Rule 6(e)(3)(D) may use the information only as necessary in the conduct of that person’s official duties subject to any limitations on the unauthorized disclosure of such information.”

The fact that certain grand jury information might be shared with Congress but not made public is not as problematic, or as unprecedented, as it might appear at first.  After all, the so-called Jaworski “Road Map” — a document created by the Watergate grand jury that consisted exclusively of information otherwise covered by Rule 6(e) — was provided to the House Judiciary Committee and was not thereafter shared with the public for almost 45 years, until Chief Judge Howell authorized its public release late last year.  Needless to say, the Committee was able to put that road map to very effective use with respect to a sitting President even though it could not, and did not, share the document with the general public.

c.  A possible “judicial authorization” exception?

Let’s assume that Barr redacts from the Mueller report some information that is (genuinely) covered by Rule 6(e), or shares such information only with certain committees (such as the intelligence committees) pursuant to the exception in the second sentence of Rule 6(e)(3)(D).  In that case would there be any way for Barr also to share the information with other members of Congress, too?  After all, Leon Jaworski shared the grand jury “road map” with the House Judiciary Committee, notwithstanding Rule 6(e), long before Congress enacted the Rule 6(e)(3)(D) exception.

Jaworksi was able to send the grand jury’s road map to the House Judiciary Committee only because Judge John Sirica authorized him to do so, in response to a request for such disclosure from Committee Chairman Peter Rodino on behalf of the Committee.

Citing the Sirica/Rodino precedent, several commentators have recommended that if Barr redacts from the Mueller report certain information that’s properly covered by Rule 6(e), the current House Judiciary Committee should make a similar request to the Chief Judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, Beryl Howell, asking her to authorize Barr to disclose grand jury information to Congress.

Would Chief Judge Howell have the power to authorize such disclosure?  There are two possible arguments that she would, but it’s not clear that either of them would be of much use in this case, at least not in the short run.

     — “Inherent authority”

First, several courts of appeals have held that judges retain an “inherent authority” that they enjoyed before the enactment of Rule 6(e) to authorize government attorneys to disclose grand jury information to others in at least some compelling circumstances not expressly provided for in Rule 6(e).  See Carlson v. United States, 837 F.3d 753, 761-67 (7th Cir. 2016), & cases cited therein. Indeed, as Judge Srinivasan explained on Friday, Chief Judge Sirica himself authorized disclosure of the Watergate “road map” to the Judiciary Committee based upon just such an “inherent authority” theory.

The Department of Justice’s current view, however, is that courts have no such inherent authority to stray from the specific exemptions for judicial authorizations listed in Rule 6(e)(3)(E), and yesterday a divided panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit agreed with the government in its long-awaited McKeever v. Barr decision, thereby creating a circuit-split that might wind its way up to the Supreme Court.

I tend to think that the predominant view in the courts of appeals — that judges do retain such an inherent authority — is correct; and I certainly agree with Judge Srinivasan that there was governing D.C. Circuit precedent to that same effect (Haldeman v. Sirica, 501 F.2d 714 (1974), involving the Sirica/Rodino/Jaworski case itself) that ought to have controlled the court’s decision in McKeever.

Be that as it may, however, now that the McKeever panel has ruled otherwise, Chief Judge Howell is not about to authorize Barr to disclose grand jury information to the congressional judiciary committees (let alone the public) on an “inherent authority” theory unless and until McKeever is overturned — and Barr himself surely won’t make a disclosure on the basis of such a theory unless and until the Supreme Court approves it in McKeever or another case, something that almost certainly won’t happen until the summer of 2020 at the very earliest (if it happens at all).

     — “preliminarily to” impeachment proceedings

Even apart from “inherent authority,” however, Rule 6(e) itself affords a court the power to authorize disclosure of information revealing grand-jury matters “preliminarily to or in connection with a judicial proceeding” (Rule 6(e)(3)(E)(i)), and the McKeever majority yesterday implicitly approved of Judge’s MacKinnon’s view, in his concurring opinion in Haldeman, that the House’s consideration of articles of impeachment are a “judicial proceeding” for purposes of this exception.  Accord In re Grand Jury Proceedings of Grand Jury No. 81-1, 669 F. Supp. 1072, 1074-75 (S.D. Fla.) (holding that House Judiciary Committee was entitled to receive the record of grand jury proceedings in furtherance of its impeachment investigation of Judge Alcee Hastings), aff’d, 833 F.2d 1438 (11th Cir. 1987). Indeed, the McKeever court held (see page 10 n.3) that that’s the proper reading of the court of appe


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1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): “Trump anxiety” – Google News: Tension And Anxiety In Border Cities After Trump Threatens Closure – WUTC

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Tension And Anxiety In Border Cities After Trump Threatens Closure  WUTC

President Trump has backed off his threats to shut down the U.S.-Mexico border. But uncertainty and disruptions along the border have created anxiety for.

“Trump anxiety” – Google News

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites)


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“trump putin” – Google News: Facts Matter: Russian president wanted Trump to win election – Chicago Daily Herald

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Facts Matter: Russian president wanted Trump to win election  Chicago Daily Herald

President Donald Trump recently declared Russia wanted Hillary Clinton to win the presidency, but that contradicts what Russa President Vladimir Putin said in …

“trump putin” – Google News


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“2016 Presidential Election Investigation” – Google News: Netanyahu vows to annex West Bank settlements if re-elected Israel PM – WCTI12.com

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Netanyahu vows to annex West Bank settlements if re-elected Israel PM  WCTI12.com

JERUSALEM (AP) — Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu pledged Saturday to annex Jewish settlements in the occupied West Bank if re-elected, …

“2016 Presidential Election Investigation” – Google News


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“Jared Kushner” – Google News: Trump says he made Golan Heights decision after a quick history lesson – KFGO News

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Trump says he made Golan Heights decision after a quick history lesson  KFGO News

By Roberta Rampton LAS VEGAS (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump said on Saturday he made the controversial decision to recognize Israel’s 1981 …

“Jared Kushner” – Google News


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Trump Investigations, Middle East, and Israel from Michael_Novakhov (5 sites): “israel and germany” – Google News: Israel could face austerity under next government – Ynetnews

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Israel could face austerity under next government  Ynetnews

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has long touted the economic successes of Israel; however, he and his finance minister, Moshe Kahlon, have cut taxes …

“israel and germany” – Google News

Trump Investigations, Middle East, and Israel from Michael_Novakhov (5 sites)


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“Jared Kushner” – Google News: Authorities investigate ‘suspicious’ fires at 3 black churches in Louisiana – WCTI12.com

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Authorities investigate ‘suspicious’ fires at 3 black churches in Louisiana  WCTI12.com

OPELOUSAS, La. (AP) — Authorities in southern Louisiana are investigating a string of “suspicious” fires at three African American churches in recent days.

“Jared Kushner” – Google News


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1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): “Russian Intelligence services” – Google News: Thousands protest for power, water and an end to Maduro – Venezuela crisis – TRT World

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Thousands protest for power, water and an end to Maduro – Venezuela crisis  TRT World

US and dozens of other countries recognise opposition leader Juan Guaido as oil-rich country’s interim leader against President Nicolas Maduro, who refuses to …

“Russian Intelligence services” – Google News

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites)


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1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): “Trump” – Google News: Trump Speech: Trump to speak at Republican Jewish Coalition event in Las Vegas – CBS News

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Trump Speech: Trump to speak at Republican Jewish Coalition event in Las Vegas  CBS News

Trump’s visit to Las Vegas comes after he toured a stretch of the border in California on Friday.

“Trump” – Google News

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites)


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The Trump Investigations Blog by Michael Novakhov – Review Of News And Opinions: Political Criminology

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Political Criminology is based on the case study approach rather than the statistical studies. It is essentially the Interpretative, Hermeneutic, Psychodynamic-Psychoanalytical Criminology and its working fields are the Psychoanalysis (broadly: all and any school) of History, Culture, and the Historical Personalities (Political and Historical rather than Clinical or Forensic Personology). 
M.N. – 2:33 PM 4/6/2019

The Trump Investigations Blog by Michael Novakhov – Review Of News And Opinions


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Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠: 2:01 PM 4/6/2019 – Barr defends handling of Mueller’s Russia report – WPTV.com 06/04/19 13:17

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Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
from The Trump Investigations Blog by Michael Novakhov – Review Of News And Opinions.

2:01 PM 4/6/2019 – Barr defends handling of Mueller’s Russia report – WPTV.com 06/04/19 13:17

2:01 PM 4/6/2019 – Barr defends handling of Mueller’s Russia report – WPTV.com 06/04/19 13:17

Trump Investigations News Review In Brief

» 1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): “donald trump russia” – Google News: Barr defends handling of Mueller’s Russia report – WPTV.com
06/04/19 13:17 from Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (32 sites)
Barr defends handling of Mueller’s Russia report    WPTV.com Attorney General William Barr on Thursday defended his handling of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on the Russia investigation, saying the confidential … “d…
» “2016 Presidential Election Investigation” – Google News: US wants 2 years to ID migrant kids separated from families – NBC 15 WPMI
06/04/19 13:13 from Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (32 sites)
US wants 2 years to ID migrant kids separated from families    NBC 15 WPMI SAN DIEGO (AP) — The Trump administration wants up to two years to find potentially thousands of children who were separated from their parents at the ….
» 1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): “trump as danger to National Security” – Google News: Putting president Trump’s executive order on electromagnetic pulses (EMP) in context | TheHill – The Hill
06/04/19 13:00 from Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (32 sites)
Putting president Trump’s executive order on electromagnetic pulses (EMP) in context | TheHill    The Hill We should remain vigilant against overreaction and overregulation that does not make us safer. “trump as danger to Natio…
» 1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): Politics: Obama says he worries about ‘rigidity’ among liberal Democrats
06/04/19 12:59 from Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (32 sites)
The former president expressed concerns about the “circular firing squad” that can form over “purity on the issue,” during speech in Berlin. Politics 1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites)
» Trump News TV from Michael_Novakhov (11 sites): FoxNewsChannel’s YouTube Videos: Live: Trump addresses the Republican Jewish Coalition
06/04/19 12:59 from Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (32 sites)
From: FoxNewsChannel Duration: 00:00 Expected to happen live at 2 p.m. ET – President Trump will speak at the Republican Jewish Coalition 2019 annual leadership meeting in Las Vegas, NV. FOX News operates the FOX News Channel (FNC), FOX …
» “Jared Kushner” – Google News: Kushner or ‘Thing Addams’? Users Wild as ‘Hand’ Helps Trump Deal With Umbrella – Sputnik International
06/04/19 12:52 from Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (32 sites)
Kushner or ‘Thing Addams’? Users Wild as ‘Hand’ Helps Trump Deal With Umbrella    Sputnik International It’s been no secret that Donald Trump has a somewhat troubling relationship with umbrellas, but he has apparently found a w…
» Trump-Russia investigation | The Guardian: Trump: Mueller report a ‘total waste of time’ – but it proves no collusion
06/04/19 12:40 from Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (32 sites)
President issues Saturday morning tweet storm from Las Vegas Opinion: Trump wants to distract from Mueller. Don’t let him Donald Trump said on Saturday he has not read Robert Mueller’s report about contacts between his 2016 campaign and …
» 1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): “crime and terror” – Google News: ‘Murder for Hire’ Is an Addictive New True-Crime Series from ‘Law & Order’s’ Dick Wolf – The Cheat Sheet
06/04/19 12:33 from Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (32 sites)
‘Murder for Hire’ Is an Addictive New True-Crime Series from ‘Law & Order’s’ Dick Wolf    The Cheat Sheet The first episode of “Murder for Hire” explores the shocking story of a therapist who attempted to have her ex-husband ki…
» 1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): “trump electorate” – Google News: Live: President Trump addresses the Republican Jewish Coalition in Las Vegas – KRNV My News 4
06/04/19 12:31 from Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (32 sites)
Live: President Trump addresses the Republican Jewish Coalition in Las Vegas    KRNV My News 4 LAS VEGAS (AP) — President Donald Trump is set to make the case for Jewish voters to back his re-election as he takes a victory lap …
» 1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: D.C. Circuit’s Lockdown on Grand Jury Material May Hinder Congress and Historians
06/04/19 12:30 from Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (32 sites)
McKeever v. Barr , a ruling issued by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit on April 5, rejects the argument that federal judges can release grand jury evidence whenever they think it’s in the public interest. The holding may be…
» 1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): “trump and republican party” – Google News: US citizen arrests set to deepen divide between Trump, GOP over Saudi Arabia – CNN
06/04/19 12:30 from Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (32 sites)
US citizen arrests set to deepen divide between Trump, GOP over Saudi Arabia    CNN Saudi Arabia arrested two more American citizens Friday in a direct snub to Congress, a move sure to create even more domestic political heat f…
» 1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices: Summary: D.C. Circuit Rules on Grand Jury Secrecy in McKeever v. Barr
06/04/19 12:29 from Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (32 sites)
On April 5, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ruled in McKeever v. Barr , a case concerning the court’s power to release material protected under grand jury secrecy. Its opinion, which holds that a district court lacks inher…
» mikenov on Twitter: Modern Noir Songs youtu.be/AU_PuF59E5g via @YouTube
06/04/19 12:22 from Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (32 sites)
Modern Noir Songs youtu.be/AU_PuF59E5g via @YouTube Posted by mikenov on Saturday, April 6th, 2019 4:22pm mikenov on Twitter
» Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠: Modern Noir Songs – YouTube
06/04/19 12:22 from Trump Investigations from Michael_Novakhov (32 sites)
Michael_Novakhov shared this story . Modern Noir Songs Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠
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1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): “donald trump russia” – Google News: Barr defends handling of Mueller’s Russia report – WPTV.com

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Barr defends handling of Mueller’s Russia report  WPTV.com

Attorney General William Barr on Thursday defended his handling of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on the Russia investigation, saying the confidential …

“donald trump russia” – Google News

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites)


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“2016 Presidential Election Investigation” – Google News: US wants 2 years to ID migrant kids separated from families – NBC 15 WPMI

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US wants 2 years to ID migrant kids separated from families  NBC 15 WPMI

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The Trump administration wants up to two years to find potentially thousands of children who were separated from their parents at the …

“2016 Presidential Election Investigation” – Google News


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1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): “trump as danger to National Security” – Google News: Putting president Trump’s executive order on electromagnetic pulses (EMP) in context | TheHill – The Hill

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Putting president Trump’s executive order on electromagnetic pulses (EMP) in context | TheHill  The Hill

We should remain vigilant against overreaction and overregulation that does not make us safer.

“trump as danger to National Security” – Google News

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites)


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1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): “Trump anxiety” – Google News: Institute Insights: You don’t have to be lonely. Just volunteer – Wilkes Barre Times-Leader

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Institute Insights: You don’t have to be lonely. Just volunteer  Wilkes Barre Times-Leader

Volunteerism among college students in the region has been strong and robust over the past few years. According to a recent Institute student poll on civic …

“Trump anxiety” – Google News

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites)


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1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites): Palmer Report: Paul Ryan still sucks

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Former Speaker of the House Paul Ryan took a gratuitous swipe at Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez this week while seemingly enjoying his newfound post-congressional irrelevancy. In an interview this week in his hometown of Janesville, Wisconsin, Ryan was asked about parallels between himself and Ocasio-Cortez, given that the two were each sworn into Congress at a very young age. Ryan revealed that he met AOC shortly after her November win and that he proceeded to offer her advice: “Take it easy, just watch things for a while, don’t ruffle, you know, see how it works first.” Ryan then joined the audience in laughter as he lamented that “I don’t think she really listened to a thing I said.”



Fortunately, AOC did indeed not listen to a thing Ryan said. Instead, she chose to move forward immediately to do the job for which she was elected and fight for what she believes in. As Senate Majority Leader Mitch Connell might put it, “Nevertheless, she persisted.” The reality is that no one needs to “see how it works first” because we have already seen how the whole system has not worked under Ryan’s feckless speakership. The blue wave that came crashing ashore in November was a cry for change, demanding action, transparency, and accountability. Ryan wielded the powerful Speaker’s gavel for two years of Trump’s presidency, yet he failed to stand up to the chief executive in any meaningful way.



After retiring from Congress altogether, Ryan handed the gavel to Nancy Pelosi, who did not forget that Congress is a co-equal branch of government under the Constitution. Like AOC, Pelosi also knows better than to listen to anything Ryan says. In just a few short months, people like Pelosi and AOC have reminded us that our Constitution established a system of government that is meant to operate under the principle of checks and balances.


At another point in the interview, Paul Ryan, who ran unsuccessfully for Vice President alongside Mitt Romney in 2012, got a question about his future political aspirations. “When are you going to run for president?” the interviewer asked. After some nervous chuckling, Ryan quipped, “I’m smarter than that.” Finally, he said something worth listening to.



The post Paul Ryan still sucks appeared first on Palmer Report.

Palmer Report

1. Trump from Michael_Novakhov (196 sites)


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