Michael Flynn – Google Search – Wednesday December 12th, 2018 at 7:27 AM

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michael flynn – Google SearchWednesday December 12th, 2018 at 7:27 AM

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michael flynn – Google SearchWednesday December 12th, 2018 at 7:26 AM

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Michael Flynn Asks Judge for Leniency for Lying to FBI

New York Times-8 hours agoWASHINGTON — Lawyers for Michael T. Flynn, President Trump’s first national security adviser, asked a federal judge late Tuesday to spare …Michael Flynn’s lawyers ask judge for no jail time
<a href=”http://NBCNews.com” rel=”nofollow”>NBCNews.com</a>-9 hours agoMichael Flynn’s lawyers request no prison time, defend cooperation …
USA TODAY-9 hours agoMichael Flynn asks judge to spare him from jail time
The Hill-10 hours agoMichael Flynn’s lawyers ask for 200 hours of community service and …
Business Insider-9 hours agoView all

Story image for michael flynn from Atlanta Journal Constitution

Mueller investigation: Michael Flynn requests no jail time in court filing …

Atlanta Journal Constitution-8 hours agoAttorneys for President Donald Trump’s former national security adviser MichaelFlynn asked a judged to spare him prison time in a memo filed …Flynn argues against prison time in Russia investigation
WSB Atlanta-10 hours agoView all

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Michael Flynn asks judge to let him avoid prison

CBS News-5 hours agoWith reporting by Robert Legare. Former National Security Adviser MichaelFlynn’s attorneys filed a sentencing recommendation Tuesday …Memo: FBI recommended Michael Flynn not have lawyer present …
Washington Examiner-8 hours agoMichael Flynn asks federal judge to spare prison sentence after …
ABC News-9 hours agoFlynn pleads with judge for no jail time
In-Depth-Politico-9 hours agoView all

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Michael Flynn asks federal judge to spare him from prison time

ABC Action News-9 hours agoFormer national security adviser to President Donald Trump Michael Flynn has asked a federal judge to spare him from prison time, according …Michael Flynn Asks For No Prison Time, Cites Help He Gave Special …
NPR-9 hours agoView all

Document: Michael Flynn Files Sentencing Memo

Lawfare (blog)-9 hours agoMichael Flynn has filed his sentencing memo in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. The memo is available here and below.

Ex-National Security Adviser Michael Flynn asks for probation …

WSOC Charlotte-10 hours agoWASHINGTON – WASHINGTON (AP) – Ex-National Security Adviser MichaelFlynn asks for probation, community service in Russia probe false …

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Michael Flynn Was a Key Cooperator and Should Serve Little Prison …

New York Times-Dec 5, 2018WASHINGTON — Michael T. Flynn, President Trump’s first national security adviser, helped substantially with the special counsel’s …Flynn has given ‘substantial assistance’ to the special counsel
In-Depth-CNN-Dec 4, 2018View all

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Why is Michael Flynn above the law?: Readers sound off

USA TODAY-Dec 9, 2018From Robert Mueller’s memo on Michael Flynn to Knickers the Australian steer to GM’s layoffs, our readers sound off on recent headlines.David Ignatius: Michael Flynn appears to have come full circle
The Spokesman-Review-Dec 9, 2018View allRead the whole story · · · ·

Robert Mueller’s case against Michael Cohen has very little to do with Trump or campaign finance violations – Washington ExaminerWednesday December 12th, 2018 at 7:19 AM

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  1. Robert Mueller’s case against Michael Cohen has very little to do with Trump or campaign finance violations  Washington Examiner
  2. Flynn sentencing memo reveals the extent of his cooperation with officials: Thousands of documents, the production of electronic devices, and over 62 hours of meetings  Business Insider
  3. Mueller Investigations Finally Begin To Worry Trump Allies  HuffPost
  4. Michael Flynn asks judge to let him avoid prison  CBS News
  5. Trump is acting very guilty for someone who has been ‘totally cleared’  Los Angeles Times
  6. View full coverage on Google News

Strasbourg shooting: Gunman at large after two killed and 11 injured – BBC NewsWednesday December 12th, 2018 at 7:16 AM

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Strasbourg shooting: Gunman at large after two killed and 11 injured  BBC News

Two people have been killed and 11 others wounded in a shooting in the eastern French city of Strasbourg. The gunman, known to security services, is on the …View full coverage on Google News

Flynn sentencing memo reveals the extent of his cooperation with officials: Thousands of documents, the production of electronic devices, and over 62 hours of meetings – Business InsiderWednesday December 12th, 2018 at 6:41 AM

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Flynn sentencing memo reveals the extent of his cooperation with officials: Thousands of documents, the production of electronic devices, and over 62 hours of meetings  Business Insider

Attorneys for Michael Flynn released a sentencing memo suggesting 200 hours of community service and no prison time, in return for his cooperation with the …

6:18 AM 12/12/2018 – sundar pichai: a goat or the scapegoat? – Google Search | Google: The New Global Censor or the Greedy Gatekeeper? Or both? – The News and TimesWednesday December 12th, 2018 at 6:24 AM

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6:18 AM 12/12/2018 – sundar pichai: a goat or the scapegoat? – Google Search | Google: The New Global Censor or the Greedy Gatekeeper? Or both?

sundar pichai: a goat or the scapegoat? – Google Search

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sundar pichai: a goat or the scapegoat? – Google Search

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sundar pichai: a goat or the scapegoat? – Google Search

Wednesday December 12th, 2018 at 6:09 AM1 Share

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Opinion | Sundar Pichai Should Resign as Google’s C.E.O.

Wednesday December 12th, 2018 at 6:07 AM

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There are many actors in the whole Google/diversity drama, but I’d say the one who’s behaved the worst is the C.E.O., Sundar Pichai.

The first actor is James Damore, who wrote the memo. In it, he was trying to explain why 80 percent of Google’s tech employees are male. He agreed that there are large cultural biases but also pointed to a genetic component. Then he described some of the ways the distribution of qualities differs across male and female populations.

Damore was tapping into the long and contentious debate about genes and behavior. On one side are those who believe that humans come out as blank slates and are formed by social structures. On the other are the evolutionary psychologists who argue that genes interact with environment and play a large role in shaping who we are. In general the evolutionary psychologists have been winning this debate.

When it comes to the genetic differences between male and female brains, I’d say the mainstream view is that male and female abilities are the same across the vast majority of domains — I.Q., the ability to do math, etc. But there are some ways that male and female brains are, on average, different. There seems to be more connectivity between the hemispheres, on average, in female brains. Prenatal exposure to different levels of androgen does seem to produce different effects throughout the life span.

In his memo, Damore cites a series of studies, making the case, for example, that men tend to be more interested in things and women more interested in people. (Interest is not the same as ability.) Several scientists in the field have backed up his summary of the data. “Despite how it’s been portrayed, the memo was fair and factually accurate,” Debra Soh wrote in The Globe and Mail in Toronto.

Geoffrey Miller, a prominent evolutionary psychologist, wrote in Quillette, “For what it’s worth, I think that almost all of the Google memo’s empirical claims are scientifically accurate.”

Damore was especially careful to say this research applies only to populations, not individuals: “Many of these differences are small and there’s significant overlap between men and women, so you can’t say anything about an individual given these population-level distributions.”

That’s the crucial point. But of course we don’t live as populations; we live our individual lives.

We should all have a lot of sympathy for the second group of actors in this drama, the women in tech who felt the memo made their lives harder. Picture yourself in a hostile male-dominated environment, getting interrupted at meetings, being ignored, having your abilities doubted, and along comes some guy arguing that women are on average less status hungry and more vulnerable to stress. Of course you’d object.

What we have is a legitimate tension. Damore is describing a truth on one level; his sensible critics are describing a different truth, one that exists on another level. He is championing scientific research; they are championing gender equality. It takes a little subtlety to harmonize these strands, but it’s doable.

Of course subtlety is in hibernation in modern America. The third player in the drama is Google’s diversity officer, Danielle Brown. She didn’t wrestle with any of the evidence behind Damore’s memo. She just wrote his views “advanced incorrect assumptions about gender.” This is ideology obliterating reason.

The fourth actor is the media. The coverage of the memo has been atrocious.

As Conor Friedersdorf wrote in The Atlantic, “I cannot remember the last time so many outlets and observers mischaracterized so many aspects of a text everyone possessed.” Various reporters and critics apparently decided that Damore opposes all things Enlightened People believe and therefore they don’t have to afford him the basic standards of intellectual fairness.

The mob that hounded Damore was like the mobs we’ve seen on a lot of college campuses. We all have our theories about why these moral crazes are suddenly so common. I’d say that radical uncertainty about morality, meaning and life in general is producing intense anxiety. Some people embrace moral absolutism in a desperate effort to find solid ground. They feel a rare and comforting sense of moral certainty when they are purging an evil person who has violated one of their sacred taboos.

Which brings us to Pichai, the supposed grown-up in the room. He could have wrestled with the tension between population-level research and individual experience. He could have stood up for the free flow of information. Instead he joined the mob. He fired Damore and wrote, “To suggest a group of our colleagues have traits that make them less biologically suited to that work is offensive and not O.K.”

That is a blatantly dishonest characterization of the memo. Damore wrote nothing like that about his Google colleagues. Either Pichai is unprepared to understand the research (unlikely), is not capable of handling complex data flows (a bad trait in a C.E.O.) or was simply too afraid to stand up to a mob.

Regardless which weakness applies, this episode suggests he should seek a nonleadership position. We are at a moment when mobs on the left and the right ignore evidence and destroy scapegoats. That’s when we need good leaders most.Read the whole story · · · · · · · · ·

Michael_Novakhov4 minutes agoREPLYEDIT1 public comment

mkalus487 days agoREPLY“Either Pichai is unprepared to understand the research (unlikely), is not capable of handling complex data flows (a bad trait in a C.E.O.) or was simply too afraid to stand up to a mob.

Regardless which weakness applies, this episode suggests he should seek a nonleadership position. We are at a moment when mobs on the left and the right ignore evidence and destroy scapegoats. That’s when we need good leaders most.”IPHONE: 49.287476,-123.142136

sundar pichai: a goat or the scapegoat? – Google Search

Wednesday December 12th, 2018 at 6:06 AM1 Share

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Sundar Pichai confirmed details about Google’s China search project

Wednesday December 12th, 2018 at 6:01 AMRead the whole story · · · · · · · · ·Next Page of StoriesLoading…Page 2

sundar pichai: a goat or the scapegoat? – Google SearchWednesday December 12th, 2018 at 6:10 AM

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sundar pichai: a goat or the scapegoat? – Google SearchWednesday December 12th, 2018 at 6:09 AM

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sundar pichai: a goat or the scapegoat? – Google SearchWednesday December 12th, 2018 at 6:09 AM

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Opinion | Sundar Pichai Should Resign as Google’s C.E.O.Wednesday December 12th, 2018 at 6:07 AM

1 Comment and 2 Shares

There are many actors in the whole Google/diversity drama, but I’d say the one who’s behaved the worst is the C.E.O., Sundar Pichai.

The first actor is James Damore, who wrote the memo. In it, he was trying to explain why 80 percent of Google’s tech employees are male. He agreed that there are large cultural biases but also pointed to a genetic component. Then he described some of the ways the distribution of qualities differs across male and female populations.

Damore was tapping into the long and contentious debate about genes and behavior. On one side are those who believe that humans come out as blank slates and are formed by social structures. On the other are the evolutionary psychologists who argue that genes interact with environment and play a large role in shaping who we are. In general the evolutionary psychologists have been winning this debate.

When it comes to the genetic differences between male and female brains, I’d say the mainstream view is that male and female abilities are the same across the vast majority of domains — I.Q., the ability to do math, etc. But there are some ways that male and female brains are, on average, different. There seems to be more connectivity between the hemispheres, on average, in female brains. Prenatal exposure to different levels of androgen does seem to produce different effects throughout the life span.

In his memo, Damore cites a series of studies, making the case, for example, that men tend to be more interested in things and women more interested in people. (Interest is not the same as ability.) Several scientists in the field have backed up his summary of the data. “Despite how it’s been portrayed, the memo was fair and factually accurate,” Debra Soh wrote in The Globe and Mail in Toronto.

Geoffrey Miller, a prominent evolutionary psychologist, wrote in Quillette, “For what it’s worth, I think that almost all of the Google memo’s empirical claims are scientifically accurate.”

Damore was especially careful to say this research applies only to populations, not individuals: “Many of these differences are small and there’s significant overlap between men and women, so you can’t say anything about an individual given these population-level distributions.”

That’s the crucial point. But of course we don’t live as populations; we live our individual lives.

We should all have a lot of sympathy for the second group of actors in this drama, the women in tech who felt the memo made their lives harder. Picture yourself in a hostile male-dominated environment, getting interrupted at meetings, being ignored, having your abilities doubted, and along comes some guy arguing that women are on average less status hungry and more vulnerable to stress. Of course you’d object.

What we have is a legitimate tension. Damore is describing a truth on one level; his sensible critics are describing a different truth, one that exists on another level. He is championing scientific research; they are championing gender equality. It takes a little subtlety to harmonize these strands, but it’s doable.

Of course subtlety is in hibernation in modern America. The third player in the drama is Google’s diversity officer, Danielle Brown. She didn’t wrestle with any of the evidence behind Damore’s memo. She just wrote his views “advanced incorrect assumptions about gender.” This is ideology obliterating reason.

The fourth actor is the media. The coverage of the memo has been atrocious.

As Conor Friedersdorf wrote in The Atlantic, “I cannot remember the last time so many outlets and observers mischaracterized so many aspects of a text everyone possessed.” Various reporters and critics apparently decided that Damore opposes all things Enlightened People believe and therefore they don’t have to afford him the basic standards of intellectual fairness.

The mob that hounded Damore was like the mobs we’ve seen on a lot of college campuses. We all have our theories about why these moral crazes are suddenly so common. I’d say that radical uncertainty about morality, meaning and life in general is producing intense anxiety. Some people embrace moral absolutism in a desperate effort to find solid ground. They feel a rare and comforting sense of moral certainty when they are purging an evil person who has violated one of their sacred taboos.

Which brings us to Pichai, the supposed grown-up in the room. He could have wrestled with the tension between population-level research and individual experience. He could have stood up for the free flow of information. Instead he joined the mob. He fired Damore and wrote, “To suggest a group of our colleagues have traits that make them less biologically suited to that work is offensive and not O.K.”

That is a blatantly dishonest characterization of the memo. Damore wrote nothing like that about his Google colleagues. Either Pichai is unprepared to understand the research (unlikely), is not capable of handling complex data flows (a bad trait in a C.E.O.) or was simply too afraid to stand up to a mob.

Regardless which weakness applies, this episode suggests he should seek a nonleadership position. We are at a moment when mobs on the left and the right ignore evidence and destroy scapegoats. That’s when we need good leaders most.Read the whole story · · ·

Michael_Novakhov1 hour agoREPLYEDIT1 public comment

mkalus487 days agoREPLY”Either Pichai is unprepared to understand the research (unlikely), is not capable of handling complex data flows (a bad trait in a C.E.O.) or was simply too afraid to stand up to a mob.

Regardless which weakness applies, this episode suggests he should seek a nonleadership position. We are at a moment when mobs on the left and the right ignore evidence and destroy scapegoats. That’s when we need good leaders most.”IPHONE: 49.287476,-123.142136

sundar pichai: a goat or the scapegoat? – Google SearchWednesday December 12th, 2018 at 6:06 AM

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