3:53 PM 10/20/2017 – Report: House Republicans planning to begin impeachment…

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One Month Since Maria Hit Puerto Rico, President Trump Must Commit To Long-Term Recovery

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Tweets cannot change the facts on the ground.

Report: House Republicans planning to begin impeachment once first Trump-Russia indictment lands 

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Everyone involved knows indictments are inevitable, if not imminent, in Donald Trump’s Russia scandal. Special Counsel Robert Mueller is planning to indict and prosecute Trump’s underlings in order to pressure them into flipping on Trump. It’s been far less clear how the scandal will play out in parallel on the political side once the prosecutorial side reaches the indictment stage. But now one House insider has provided what may be a big piece to the puzzle.

Political insider Scott Dworkin is the co-founder of the Democratic Coalition Against Trump, and he’s also periodically a guest commentator on MSNBC. This morning he revealed that a senior staff member for a Republican Congressman told him, “We’re bracing for an indictment, when first one hits we will impeach.” (link). With the current dysfunction in the GOP, it’s not a given that they’d all be on the same page with this. But it does offer a glimpse into how the GOP could try to preemptively oust Donald Trump ahead of the midterms, in the hope of avoiding getting wiped out themselves.

If Trump’s own Republican Party begins impeachment hearings against him, it would leave him without any remaining meaningful support in the federal government. It would also send a signal to average Republicans among the American public that it’s time to give up on Trump, which would send his approval rating hurtling even lower than it is now. The ongoing impeachment hearings and his collapsing support could leave him in a position where he’d have little choice but to resign.

The Republican Party would then try to quickly regroup behind President Mike Pence heading into the midterms, under the premise that they “fixed” the problem in their own house by ousting Donald Trump. But the Democrats would still be in a strong position to win a majority in the House and Senate. If Robert Mueller then unearths proof of Pence’s complicity in the Trump-Russia scandal or coverup, the Democrats could move forward with Pence impeachment hearings after the midterms.

The post Report: House Republicans planning to begin impeachment once first Trump-Russia indictment lands appeared first on Palmer Report.

1:21 PM 10/20/2017 – Fake Melania shows our real anxiety

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Selected and Saved News Stories – Trump  Fake Melania shows our real anxiety – Washington Post Saved Stories – 1. Trump Anthony Atamanuik’s Trump Takes a Psychological Fitness Test on ‘The President Show’ – Splitsider SitRep: FBI Steps in to Aid Niger Probe, Pompeo Breaks Ranks – Foreign Policy (blog) Number of US adults without … Continue reading “1:21 PM 10/20/2017 – Fake Melania shows our real anxiety”

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Trump Voters Believe Sex Allegations Against Weinstein, But Not Against Trump

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Trump’s base has no problem calling out Hollywood, but gives the president the benefit of the doubt.

Hypocrite-In-Chief : President Trump’s Crusade Against Criminal Justice Reform – HuffPost

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HuffPost
Hypocrite-In-Chief : President Trump’s Crusade Against Criminal Justice Reform
HuffPost
President Obama signed an executive order calling for a ban and review of issuing military equipment to police departments. In addition, the federal government launched an investigationinto the Ferguson Police Department and their violation of civil 

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Roles and Responsibilities for Defending the Nation from Cyber Attack — FBI

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Chairman McCain, Ranking Member Reed, and members of the committee, thank you for the invitation to provide remarks on the FBI’s role in defending the nation against cyber threats.

As the committee is well aware, the frequency and impact of cyber attacks on our nation’s private sector and government networks have increased dramatically in the past decade and are expected to continue to grow. We continue to see an increase in the scale and scope of reporting on malicious cyber activity that can be measured by the amount of corporate data stolen or deleted, personally identifiable information compromised, or remediation costs incurred by U.S. victims. Within the FBI, we are focused on the most dangerous malicious cyber activity: high-level intrusions by state-sponsored hackers and global organized crime syndicates, as well as other technically sophisticated attacks.

Cyber threats are not only increasing in scope and scale, they are also becoming increasingly difficult to investigate. Cyber criminals often operate through online forums, selling illicit goods and services, including tools that can be used to facilitate cyber attacks. These criminals have also increased the sophistication of their schemes, which are more difficult to detect and more resilient. Additionally, many cyber actors are based abroad or obfuscate their identities by using foreign infrastructure, making coordination with international law enforcement partners essential.

The FBI has worked with the rest of the intelligence and law enforcement community to address the unique set of challenges presented by the cyber threat. The information domain is an inherently different battle space, requiring government bureaucracies to shift and transform to eliminate duplicative efforts and stovepipes and move toward real-time coordination and collaboration to keep pace with the growing threat. Considerable progress has been made toward the shared goal of protecting the country from capable and unrelenting cyber adversaries, but there is still a lot to be done to ensure our government agencies have the proper resources, structure, and mission to seamlessly work together on the cyber threat. The FBI will continue to be a leader in this area, and we have taken a number of steps in the last several years to ensure we are adequately structured to respond to threats in an agile and efficient way.

The decentralized FBI field structure is intended to support the investigation of crimes across the nation. The FBI is made up of 56 field offices spanning all 50 states and U.S. territories, each with a multi-agency Cyber Task Force (CTF) modeled after the successful Joint Terrorism Task Force program. The task forces bring together cyber investigators, prosecutors, intelligence analysts, computer scientists, and digital forensic technicians from various federal, state, and local agencies present within the office’s territory. Our field-centric business model allows us to develop relationships with local companies and organizations, putting us in an ideal position to engage with potential victims of cyber attacks and crimes. Cyber-trained special agents are in each field office, providing locally available expertise to deploy to victim sites immediately upon notice of an incident. Computer scientists and intelligence analysts are also stationed in field offices to support incident response efforts and provide intelligence collection and analysis as well as technical assistance and capability.

In addition to the resources in the field, the FBI has the Cyber Action Team (CAT), Cyber Division’s elite rapid response force. On-call CAT members are prepared to deploy globally to bring their in-depth cyber intrusion expertise and specialized investigative skills to bear in response to significant cyber incidents. CAT’s management and core team are based at headquarters, supplemented by carefully selected and highly trained field personnel. CAT members are available to supplement the technical capabilities in the field, and they are typically deployed in support of significant cyber incidents that have the potential to impact public health or safety, national security, economic security, or public confidence.

Cybersecurity threats and incidents are occurring around the clock, which motivated Cyber Division in 2014 to establish a steady-state 24-hour watch capability called CyWatch. Housed at the National Cyber Investigative Joint Task Force (NCIJTF), CyWatch is responsible for coordinating domestic law enforcement response to criminal and national security cyber intrusions, tracking victim notification, and coordinating with the other federal cyber centers many times each day. CyWatch provides continuous connectivity to interagency partners to facilitate information sharing and real-time incident management and tracking as part of an effort to ensure all agencies are coordinating. CyWatch also manages FBI’s Cyber Guardian program, through which more than 5,000 victim notifications were logged and coordinated in FY 2016.

In addition to these cyber specific resources, the FBI has other technical assets that can be utilized as necessary to combat cyber threats. Our Operational Technology Division develops and maintains a wide range of sophisticated equipment, capabilities, and tools to support investigations and assist with technical operations. The FBI maintains a robust forensic capability through its Regional Computer Forensic Laboratory program, a national network of FBI-sponsored digital forensics laboratories and training centers devoted to the examination of digital evidence. The Critical Incident Response Group (CIRG) provides crisis support and incident management assistance. These resources can be leveraged throughout the FBI’s response and investigative cycle to respond to cyber threats.

Given the international nature of cyber crime and the reality that the actors who seek to harm the U.S. through cyber means are often located abroad, the FBI relies on a robust international presence to supplement its domestic footprint. Through the Cyber Assistant Legal Attaché (Cyber ALAT) program, the FBI embeds cyber agents, who are trained both at FBI Headquarters and in the field, with our international counterparts in 18 key locations across the globe where they build relationships with our international partners. These relationships are essential to working cyber cases that often involve malicious actors using computer networks worldwide.

In order to be successful in the mission of bringing cyber criminals to justice and deterring future activity in the cyber realm, the FBI relies on partnerships with the private sector. As frequent targets of malicious cyber activity, the private sector is on the front lines of defending our nation’s critical information infrastructure, safeguarding its intellectual property, and preserving its economic prosperity. By building and maintaining partnerships with industry, the FBI is better able to share information about current and future threats, provide indicators of compromise for network defense, and provide context to help companies understand the intent behind the unnamed actors targeting their systems. These relationships also provide an optic into what kinds of nefarious activity they are observing on their systems, which helps the FBI better understand the threats.

The FBI has the capability to quickly respond to cyber incidents across the country and scale its response to the specific circumstances of the incident by utilizing all resources at its disposal throughout the field, at FBI headquarters, and abroad. Utilizing dual authorities as a domestic law enforcement organization and a member of the U.S. Intelligence Community (USIC), the FBI works closely with interagency partners in a whole-of-government approach to countering cyber threats. Presidential Policy Directive 41, signed by President Obama in July 2016, designates the Department of Justice, through the FBI and NCIJTF, as the lead federal agency for threat response. Threat response is defined as activities related to the investigation of an incident and the pursuit, disruption, and attribution of the threat actor. Through evidence collection, technical analysis, disruption efforts, and related investigative tools, the FBI works to quickly identify the source of a breach, connect it with related incidents, and determine attribution, while developing courses of action.

The FBI is able to collect domestic intelligence on cyber threats, consistent with our authorities, to help us understand and prioritize identified threats, reveal intelligence gaps, and fill those gaps. By combining this intelligence with information from our interagency partners, the FBI contributes to painting a collective picture of cyber threats facing the nation. This threat intelligence is critical to getting ahead of the threat and providing potential victims with information to assist them in better protecting their networks from compromise. The FBI liaises with the other intelligence community components through standing coordination calls among the various watch centers; participation in standing interagency groups as well as incident- and threat-based working groups; through embeds and liaison officers at other agencies and within the FBI; and through memoranda of understanding allowing close coordination on topics of high importance.

The FBI along with the rest of the intelligence community understands the need to share information both within and outside the government with the potential victims of cyber attacks. The FBI disseminates information regarding specific threats to the private sector through various methods, including Private Industry Notifications (PINs) and FBI Liaison Alert System (FLASH) reports. PINs provide unclassified information that will enhance the private sector’s awareness of a threat, and FLASH reports contain unclassified technical information collected by the FBI for use by specific private sector partners. These communication methods facilitate the sharing of information with a broad audience or specific sector. The FBI also works with industry partners in forums such as InfraGard and industry-based Information Sharing and Analysis Centers (ISACs) to relay critical information. The FBI also works closely with its government partners to put out joint notifications and reports to help the private sector guard against potential cyber threats.

In some cases, the FBI receives indicators of potential compromise from various sources, including USIC partners and foreign governments, that are used in notification to victims of cyber attacks. Victim notification is critical in preventing continued cyber intrusion activity and mitigating the damages associated with the theft of sensitive data, intellectual property, and proprietary information. The goal of notification is to provide timely and meaningful notification to the victim while protecting sensitive sources and methods and balancing investigative and operational equities of the FBI and other USIC agencies. FBI and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) have well defined policies and procedures which guide how victims are identified and how notification should be made; typically, the FBI, in coordination with DHS, will notify the individuals responsible for handling network security for the victim organization to discuss the necessary information related to the intrusion. The FBI will also provide open source information that may assist in the detection and identification of the intrusion. After the initial notification, some victims will contact the FBI to provide an update regarding the compromise of their network, while others will not. Typically, any post-notification engagement between the FBI and the victim is voluntary and its scope is determined by the company.

The FBI conducts its cyber mission with the goal of imposing costs on the adversary, and though we would like to arrest every cyber criminal who commits an offense against a U.S. person, company, or organization, we recognize indictments are just one tool in a suite of options available to the U.S. government when deciding how best to approach complex cyber threats. Working with the rest of the USIC, the FBI is able to share intelligence, better understand the threat picture, identify additional victims or potential victims of cyber intrusions, and help inform U.S. policymakers. The FBI and the intelligence community must work closely on cyber threats to provide leaders with the information necessary to decide what tools are appropriate to respond to, mitigate, and counter cyber attacks, as well as deter cyber actors and reinforce peacetime norms of state behavior in cyberspace.

Using unique resources, capabilities, and authorities, the FBI is able to impose costs on adversaries, deter illicit cyber activity, and help prevent future cyber attacks. While much progress has been made toward leveraging the FBI’s unique authorities and resources in real-time coordination with the interagency to combat cyber threats, there is still work to be done, specifically in ensuring agile and efficient incident response, seamless information sharing, and elimination of duplicative efforts. Although the resources of the FBI and of the federal government are not growing in proportion to the rapidly evolving threat, we remain steadfast in our resolve to finds ways to work together better as a government, so that we may respond to cyber threats with agility, efficiency, persistence, and ferocity.

The FBI recognizes other agencies have technical expertise, tools, and capabilities to leverage as we work together against cyber adversaries, and is committed to working through challenges associated with sharing sensitive law enforcement information and intelligence with interagency partners. The FBI understands the importance of whole-of-government collaboration, and will continue to find ways to work with the interagency in responding to cyber incidents in a coordinated manner. Given the recent developments in structuring the Department of Defense to defend the nation against cyber adversaries, the FBI is committed to finding ways to partner more closely with U.S. Cyber Command in its newly elevated role as a Unified Combatant Command and its Cyber Mission Force teams.

We at the FBI appreciate this committee’s efforts in making cyber threats a focus and committing to improving how we can work together to better defend our nation against our increasingly capable and persistent adversaries. We look forward to discussing these issues in greater detail and answering any questions you may have.

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Roles and Responsibilities for Defending the Nation from Cyber Attack – Federal Bureau of Investigation (press release) (blog)

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Roles and Responsibilities for Defending the Nation from Cyber Attack
Federal Bureau of Investigation (press release) (blog)
Within the FBI, we are focused on the most dangerous malicious cyber activity: high-level intrusions by state-sponsored hackers and global organized crime syndicates, as well as other technically sophisticated attacks. Cyber threats are not only 

1:41 PM 10/20/2017 – POSTS ON G+ | Hypocrite-In-Chief : President Trump’s Crusade Against Criminal Justice Reform

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Hypocrite-In-Chief : President Trump’s Crusade Against Criminal Justice Reform Friday October 20th, 2017 at 1:37 PM Donald Trump 1 Share The Trump administration’s views on “law and order” are designed to protect only a few. Donald Trump’s handpicked CIA Director Mike Pompeo is looking guilty as hell in the Russia scandalby Bill Palmer Friday October 20th, … Continue reading “1:41 PM 10/20/2017 – POSTS ON G+ | Hypocrite-In-Chief : President Trump’s Crusade Against Criminal Justice Reform”

Criminal Justice Reform – Google Search

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Story image for Criminal Justice Reform from Washington Examiner

Washington Examiner

Criminal Justice Reform bill will hit Senate floor next week

MetroWest Daily News16 hours ago
Legislation calling for sweeping changes to the criminal justice system – including eliminating mandatory minimum sentences for many drug …
Push for criminal justice reform grows in Senate
Washington Examiner19 hours ago

Hypocrite-In-Chief : President Trump’s Crusade Against Criminal Justice Reform

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The Trump administration’s views on “law and order” are designed to protect only a few.

Donald Trump’s handpicked CIA Director Mike Pompeo is looking guilty as hell in the Russia scandal 

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Since he’s taken office, we’ve seen Donald Trump consistently try to backstop key positions in his administration with people who were willing to protect him in his Russia scandal – because they were in on it themselves. He’s done it with everyone from Attorney General Jeff Sessions on down. Based on the increasingly suspicious behavior of Trump’s hand picked CIA Director Mike Pompeo, it’s time to ask if he was guilty in the Russia scandal as well.

Back in June, it was revealed that Pompeo kept giving classified briefings to National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, even after he definitively learned that Flynn was a traitor on the payroll of multiple foreign nations including Russia (link). Now Pompeo is at it again, falsely claiming that it’s been proven Russian meddling didn’t influence the outcome of the election (link), even though his own intelligence community is telling him the opposite.

The tricky part is that Trump has surrounded himself with a number of fellow traitors who are guilty in the Russia scandal, as well as a number of mere sycophants who were not involved in the scandal but are willing to destroy their own reputations by covering for him. Mike Pompeo was a U.S. Congressman from Kansas during the 2016 election, and it’s difficult to pin down any potential role he might have played in the Trump campaign’s coordination with Russia to rig the election. Yet he just keeps finding ways to make himself look more guilty.

It needs be pointed out that making oneself look guilty is not the same as being guilty. While we have proof that Jeff Sessions was knee deep in that coordination, and strong evidence that plenty of other Trump White House advisers were co-conspirators, there is no specific evidence linking Mike Pompeo to the treasonous scandal. But it does raise the question: if Pompeo isn’t guilty, why is he throwing his career, reputation, and future away by bending over backward to make himself look guilty?

The post Donald Trump’s handpicked CIA Director Mike Pompeo is looking guilty as hell in the Russia scandal appeared first on Palmer Report.

Donald Trump’s low-road presidency – CNN

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CNN
Donald Trump’s low-road presidency
CNN
Washington (CNN) On Thursday night, following a day of back-and-forth over who said what in a phone call between the President of the United States and a military widow, President DonaldTrump tweeted this: “The Fake News is going crazy with wacky …
Why Trump Can’t Handle the Cost of WarThe Atlantic
Trump makes himself, John Kelly and everyone around them look rotten yet againWashington Post
Grief and GrievanceSlate Magazine
Fox News –NPR –BBC News –Local 10
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9:49 AM 10/20/2017 – Russia, the Blizzard of Lies – New York Times | Russia Is a Bigger Threat to US Than North Korea or ISIS: Ex-NATO Commander 

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Selected and Saved News Stories – Trump  Saved Stories – 1. Trump Russia Is a Bigger Threat to US Than North Korea or ISIS: Ex-NATO Commander – Newsweek CIA director gets fact-checked on his assessment of Russia’s 2016 election meddling – The Week Magazine Wake Up Call: Paul Weiss Partner is Trump Pick to Head … Continue reading “9:49 AM 10/20/2017 – Russia, the Blizzard of Lies – New York Times | Russia Is a Bigger Threat to US Than North Korea or ISIS: Ex-NATO Commander”

Does the House Intel Committee Have Enough Staff to Investigate the Trump-Russia Scandal? – Mother Jones

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Mother Jones
Does the House Intel Committee Have Enough Staff to Investigate the Trump-Russia Scandal?
Mother Jones
And committee Democrats say that the Republicans were eager to interview Paul Manafort,Trump’s campaign chief who had ties to a Russian oligarch and a former Ukrainian president allied with Vladimir Putin, before Manafort had turned over all the …
Senate Investigators Want To Meet With A Trump Adviser Who Reportedly Tried To Set Up A Meeting With RussiaBuzzFeed News
Congress is spending millions on Russia investigations — but you’ll probably never know exactly how muchUSA TODAY

all 61 news articles »

Trump’s war on leakers has neutered the intelligence community’s whistleblower program, which diverts leakers – Boing Boing

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Boing Boing
Trump’s war on leakers has neutered the intelligence community’s whistleblower program, which diverts leakers
Boing Boing
The Intelligence Community Inspector General office is the place where spies and spook contractors who discover wrongdoing are supposed to be able to confidentially report their suspicions and know that they’ll be investigated and acted upon. Dan Meyer …
Seeking To Root Out Leakers, The Intelligence Community Is Destroying Official Routes For WhistleblowersTechdirt

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Anger over Donald Trump’s UK crime tweet – BBC News

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BBC News
Anger over Donald Trump’s UK crime tweet
BBC News
The US President, Donald Trump, has been accused of fuelling hate crime with a tweet linking a rise in the UK crime rate to “radical Islamic terror”. He said: “Just out report: ‘United Kingdom crime rises 13% annually amid spread of Radical Islamic terror.
The UK agency that compiled the data in Trump’s terrorism tweet disagrees with his assessmentWashington Post
Trump weighs in on UK crime rates and gets it all wrongUSA TODAY
Brits Tell Trump to Mind His Own Business After Crime TweetBloomberg
Politico –The Guardian –The Independent (blog)
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10:01 AM 10/20/2017 – TRUMP-RUSSIA: “When a country can come interfere in another country’s elections, that is warfare,” the U.S. ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley said yesterday 

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TRUMP-RUSSIA “The intelligence community’s assessment is that the Russian meddling that took place did not affect the outcome of the assessment,” C.I.A. Director Mike Pompeo said yesterday, his comments distorting the findings of a report compiled by the C.I.A. and other intelligence agencies and released in January saying that Moscow sought to undermine public faith in … Continue reading “10:01 AM 10/20/2017 – TRUMP-RUSSIA: “When a country can come interfere in another country’s elections, that is warfare,” the U.S. ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley said yesterday”

Trump turns George W. Bush into Cicero – WHYY

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WHYY
Trump turns George W. Bush into Cicero
WHYY
Think about what just happened: A former president took it upon himself to warn Americans of a clear and present danger to our national security, at a time when a successor from his own party steadfastly refuses to do it. Bush publicly rebuked Trump 
Russia, the Blizzard of LiesNew York Times

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Americans Agree That Trump Is a Liar. Do They Realize He Is also a Sociopath? – The American Prospect

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The American Prospect
Americans Agree That Trump Is a Liar. Do They Realize He Is also a Sociopath?
The American Prospect
Unlike the word “moron” (which Secretary of State Rex Tillerson allegedly called Trump), the words “lie” and “liar” are statements of fact, not opinion. Some argue that stating a falsehood is only a “lie” if you know that what you’re saying is untrue 

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Grassley won’t force Sessions to answer Trump-Comey questions – Politico

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Politico
Grassley won’t force Sessions to answer Trump-Comey questions
Politico
Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) does not plan to force Attorney General Jeff Sessions to answer questions about his private conversations with President Donald Trump concerning the firing of FBI Director James Comey, …
Sessions defends Comey firing, dodges questions on TrumpYahoo News

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10:48 AM 10/20/2017 – Thoughts as Tweets: Donald, it is not the “Radical Islamic terror”, but Germany, Russia, China, and Israel behind this convenient front and false flag. Kapish?! | ALL POSTS ON G+ 

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Donald, it is not the “Radical Islamic terror”, but Germany, Russia, China, and Israel behind this convenient front and false flag. Kapish?! pic.twitter.com/P6KlFYnHPc — Mike Nova (@mikenov) October 20, 2017 Trump Blames ‘Radical Islam’ for Uptick in Crime in Britain U.S. News & World Report WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is misrepresenting a report on British crime statistics … Continue reading “10:48 AM 10/20/2017 – Thoughts as Tweets: Donald, it is not the “Radical Islamic terror”, but Germany, Russia, China, and Israel behind this convenient front and false flag. Kapish?! | ALL POSTS ON G+”

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Today’s Headlines and Commentary 

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The U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) raised the banner of a Kurdish revolutionary leader in the captured city of Raqqa, the Wall Street Journal reported. Kurdish-led SDF members held a press conference where they hoisted a banner showing Abdullah Ocalan, a Kurdish separatist leader Turkey has jailed as a terrorist. The move provoked condemnation from the mostly Arab residents of the city. The SDF pledged to incorporate Raqqa into a planned autonomous region under a decentralized Syrian federal system, Reuters reported. The militia said it would include Raqqa in the autonomous zones it is setting up in northern Syria, outside of the control of Bashar Assad’s Syrian government. Elsewhere in Syria, Russian-backed forces moved to capture strategic towns before U.S. proxies could seize them from the retreating Islamic State, according to the Washington Post. Russian airstrikes, which apparently violated a U.S.-Russia deconfliction line, aided the swift fall of the town of Mayadeen to the Syrian government.

Spain’s government plans to dissolve Catalonia’s parliament and hold new elections to thwart the autonomous region’s push for independence, Reuters reported. Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy secured opposition support for the measures heading into an emergency Cabinet meeting on Saturday. Catalonia’s president has refused to renounce independence. The emergency measures could take advantage of an unused clause in the Spanish constitution that would allow the government to assume direct control of Catalonia’s administration, according to the New York Times.

CIA Director Mike Pompeo distorted the intelligence community’s finding that Russia interfered in the 2016 election, the Post reported. At the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, Pompeo said the intelligence assessment concluded that interference did not have an effect on the result of the election. In January, the intelligence community released an assessment that concluded Russia had interfered in the election but made no determination whether it had influenced the outcome. A CIA spokesperson said the assessment’s conclusions remained unchanged.

The FBI is involved in an investigation into the deaths of four U.S. special forces in Niger as criticism of the military’s handling of the incident mounted, the Journal reported. The FBI will gather information about the militants that ambushed the U.S. soldiers accompanying a detachment of Nigerien forces. Senator John McCain, chair of the Senate Armed Services Committee, expressed frustration at the Department of Defense’s reluctance to provide details about the incident. Secretary of Defense James Mattis said the possibility of an ambush “was considered unlikely” and pledged to get answers about the attack, Politico reported. Mattis added, “but there’s a reason we have U.S. Army soldiers there and not the Peace Corps.”

A British lawmaker called for parliament to look into Russian interference in the Brexit campaign, the New York Times reported. Ben Bradshaw, a member of the Labor Party, drew attention to possible links between financial support for the “Leave” campaign and Russian entities. Open Democracy, a civil-society organization, recently published a detailed report on the finances of one of the chief backers of Brexit and his Russian connections.

A Taliban attack completely destroyed an Afghan army unit, killing 43 soldiers, the Times reported. Using car-bombs and assault rifles, Taliban fighters wiped out nearly all the soldiers in an Afghan base in Kandahar province. The attack is the third large-scale loss for Afghan forces this week.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the U.S. would not block European trade with Iran as part of the new strategy to counter the regime, the Journal reported. Renewed European business ties with Iran were a key facet of the 2015 Iran nuclear deal. European leaders have pledged to keep sanctions suspended as long as they determine Iran complies with the agreement. Tillerson specifically declined to address whether a multi-billion dollar deal by Boeing to sell airplanes to Tehran would be allowed under the new U.S. policy.

Iran’s Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) pledged to accelerate their missile program in the face of U.S. and European opposition, Reuters reported. Last week, President Trump designated the IRGC as a terrorist organization. The IRGC’s commander said that the Trump administration’s policy shift on Iran would begin an “era of failure” for the U.S.

Foreign Policy’s Emily Tamkin wrote about a point of stability for foreign diplomats trying to connect to the White House: Mike Pence.

ICYMI: Yesterday, on Lawfare

Daniel Byman predicted how the Islamic State will respond to the fall of Raqqa.

Lee Hamilton and Thomas Kean argued that the Senate should clarify its oversight authority over the Department of Homeland Security by passing an authorization bill for the department.

Elsa Kania analyzed the policy choices involved in developing advanced artificial intelligence.

Michael Bahar, David Cook, Varun Shingari and Curtis Arnold discussed how the Supreme Court’s ruling in Carpenter v. U.S. and the FISA Amendments Act reauthorization could affect the future of third party doctrine.

Peter Swire and Richard Clarke argued that FISA Amendments Act Section 702 should be reformed to protect Fourth Amendment principles.

Benjamin Wittes shared the “Decertified” edition of Rational Security.

 

Email the Roundup Team noteworthy law and security-related articles to include, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook for additional commentary on these issues. Sign up to receive Lawfare in your inbox. Visit our Events Calendar to learn about upcoming national security events, and check out relevant job openings on our Job Board.

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11:53 AM 10/20/2017 – Don’t Forget to Adjust for Russian Trolls – The Atlantic: “According to our intelligence services, the Russian government has made a project of turning Americans against each other,” Bush said. “This effort is broad, systematic, and stealthy, it’s conducted across a range of social-media platforms.” 

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Reuters Former President George W. Bush’s speech this week in New York City flagged a malign force in the world: the “sustained attempt by a hostile power” to feed and exploit America’s divisions.“According to our intelligence services, the Russian government has made a project of turning Americans against each other,” Bush said. “This effort is broad, systematic, … Continue reading “11:53 AM 10/20/2017 – Don’t Forget to Adjust for Russian Trolls – The Atlantic: “According to our intelligence services, the Russian government has made a project of turning Americans against each other,” Bush said. “This effort is broad, systematic, and stealthy, it’s conducted across a range of social-media platforms.””

Trump blindsides advisers with promised opioid plan – Politico

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Politico
Trump blindsides advisers with promised opioid plan
Politico
President Donald Trump overrode his own advisers when he promised to deliver an emergency declaration next week to combat the nation’s worsening opioid crisis. “That is a very, very big statement,” he said Monday. “It’s a very important step. … We’re 
Trump sends family $25000 after claim of broken promiseBBC News
Trump offered a grieving military father $25000 in a phone callWashington Post
Trump sends $25000 check to fallen soldier’s family on same day as Washington Post reportCNN
ABC News
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Social media’s role in Russian meddling: Focus turns to election laws – UPI.com

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UPI.com
Social media’s role in Russian meddling: Focus turns to election laws
UPI.com
Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., (L) and ranking member Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., deliver an update on the committee’s probe into Russian interference in the 2016 elections on October 4. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI.

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This Russian general fought the mob. Why does he own $38 million of Florida real estate? – Miami Herald

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Miami Herald
This Russian general fought the mob. Why does he own $38 million of Florida real estate?
Miami Herald
A former cop with the Midas touch hardly shocks Russian insiders. “It’s typical for an anti-corruption official,” said Andrei Kozyrev, Russia’s foreign minister from 1990 to 1996 and a frequent critic of President Vladimir Putin who now lives in South 

Seeking To Root Out Leakers, The Intelligence Community Is Destroying Official Routes For Whistleblowers – Techdirt

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Seeking To Root Out Leakers, The Intelligence Community Is Destroying Official Routes For Whistleblowers
Techdirt
The Trump Administration is continuing its war on leakers. It’s probably meant to keep whistleblowers at bay as well. This isn’t necessarily a trait unique to Trump’s White House. … But it’s going to come to a head at the national security level. The 

Trump Rips ‘Wacky’ Congresswoman For Criticizing His Phone Call To Combat Widow

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And he claims Rep. Frederica Wilson “secretly” listened to a call she heard on speakerphone.

Don’t Forget to Adjust for Russian Trolls

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  • So fixated are we now on the divisions between the two major parties that we forget how often internal divisions within one party or the other shape political outcomes. A rich history could be written of the conflicts that have sundered presidents and congressional leaders of the same party, in some cases friends who turned into bitter foes. The Texan Lyndon B. Johnson, who probably had closer ties with the Senate than any other president before or since, tangled with Dixiecrats on civil rights and then with northern liberals, including his former ally Eugene McCarthy, on Vietnam. In 1990, House Republicans, led by Newt Gingrich, attacked George H. W. Bush for cutting a budget deal with Democrats and helped doom his reelection bid in 1992. It was Republican legislators who stopped George W. Bush’s attempt to reform immigration, helping wreck his second term.David A. Nichols’s Ike and McCarthy is a well-researched and sturdily written account of what may be the most important such conflict in modern history: the two years, 1953 and 1954, when Dwight D. Eisenhower, the first Republican president elected since Herbert Hoover, found himself under assault from the demagogic senator who perfected the politics of ideological slander. Joseph McCarthy had begun his rampage against “subversives” in the federal government, some real but most of them imagined, during the Truman years, amid the high anxieties of the Cold War. Hostilities had broken out in Korea, and threatened to draw in “Red China” (which had been “lost” to the Communists in 1949) or escalate into a doomsday showdown with the Soviets, newly armed with the atomic bomb. Meanwhile, billions were being doled out in foreign aid to left-wing governments in Western Europe, and homegrown spies like Alger Hiss and Julius Rosenberg had been uncovered and exposed.McCarthy was dangerous—“no bolder seditionist ever moved among us,” Richard H. Rovere wrote in his classic Senator Joe McCarthy—but much of the country was with him because he embodied, however boorishly, the forces of change. The Democrats had won every presidential election since 1932, and for much of that time had also enjoyed lopsided majorities in Congress. One party alone seemed responsible for the new postwar order, its failures as well as its successes, at a time of grand transformation for the country—from hemispheric giant to global superpower with commitments on every continent, and from land of rugged individualists to welfare state. For the new regime to flourish, Republicans had to make at least part of the agenda their own. Thus emerged the hope for a lasting bipartisan consensus.Eisenhower seemed a savior from central casting. He had guided 5 million Allied troops to victory in World War II and transcended grubby partisanship. He could have run on either party’s ticket and won; in fact, the Democrats courted him in 1948. But he was a Republican, and his victory in 1952 was smashing: 55 percent of the popular vote and 442 electoral votes. The trouble was his coattails. They were just wide enough to give the Republicans a one-vote advantage in the Senate—their second majority since the Herbert Hoover years, but not really a majority at all, Nichols explains, “because the conservative wing of the party numbered eight to twelve senators.” They were the aboriginal right—Old Guard isolationists and enemies of the New Deal. Many of them remained loyal to the incoming Senate majority leader, Robert Taft, who had lost the nomination to Eisenhower in a brutal contest, complete with allegations of delegate-stealing.At first McCarthy, who had cleverly sidestepped Taft’s plea for an endorsement, said he was finished with his hunt for Communists in the government. In Eisenhower, “we now have a President who doesn’t want party-line thinkers or fellow travelers,” he told reporters. Henceforth his mission would be to root out “graft and corruption.” But this cause didn’t promise the attention he craved, the excitement and headlines that came with Red-hunting, the “permanent floating press conference,” as one writer has put it. Soon after Eisenhower took office, McCarthy reverted to his true self and began holding up high-profile foreign appointments—including Eisenhower’s choice for ambassador to Moscow, the Soviet expert Charles Bohlen. The delay was dangerous. Stalin died in early March, and no one knew who was in charge or where things would lead. The previous ambassador, George Kennan, had been recalled in October 1952, at the Soviets’ demand, leaving no one in his place to interpret Kremlin moves from the same close-up position. After a month-long delay, in late March Bohlen was confirmed.It seemed to be reckless lone-wolfing, McCarthy defying his Senate masters. In fact, 10 other Senate Republicans had backed him. Eisenhower’s tight circle of advisers got the message. “The crowd that supported Senator Taft at the convention in 1952 are all now revolving around Joe,” said one of them, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. Taft was quick to praise McCarthy’s “very helpful and constructive” attack on the Voice of America; soon McCarthy’s snarling adjutant, Roy Cohn, and Cohn’s sidekick, G. David Schine, went on a madcap European junket. The mission involved, among other things, inspecting America’s overseas libraries for subversive material, and the triumphant yield included work by Henry David Thoreau and Herman Melville. Visits to countries on their route typically culminated in a Marx Brothers–style press conference, the babbling pair’s literary and cultural ignorance on display. And then, when Taft died, in July 1953, McCarthy was on his own. In February 1954, he announced a major speaking tour, paid for by the Republican National Committee. The party looked as if it was his as much as Eisenhower’s.McCarthy had a second constituency—the media. To Eisenhower it seemed that the press, at once credulous and cynical, was building up McCarthy. In a speech to newspaper publishers, he accused journalists of cheap sensationalism, of presenting “clichés and slogans” instead of facts. Walter Lippmann, the most respected columnist of the time, was indignant: How could a responsible press not report what McCarthy said? The same quandary attends the media today, as they figure out how to handle “fake news” and the president’s intemperate tweets. Now, as then, no good solution exists. Implying that actual news is synonymous with truth is bound to be erroneous: In reality, journalism is the first, not final, draft of history—provisional, revisable, susceptible to mistakes and at times falsehoods, despite the efforts of even the most scrupulous reporters. The problems don’t end there. Those who covered McCarthy’s every move inevitably became his “co-conspirators,” as one of them, Murray Kempton, later said. “In the end, I did not feel any cleaner than he was … I pretended once again now and then that McCarthy was not a serious man; but I always knew that the devil in me and the larger devil in him were very consequential figures indeed.” It is a mistake journalists repeated in 2016.

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  • “Being a refugee … is the most pervasive kind of cruelty that can be exercised against a human being.” So says an interviewee in the Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei’s new documentary, Human Flow, bringing to life the stakes of a crisis that has displaced more than 65 million people worldwide.A displaced person himself who is living in exile in Berlin, Ai involves viewers in these stakes, implicating them by virtue of collective passivity. He also suggests that the crisis is by no means a contemporary phenomenon, and that it is endemic to the human condition: As if by osmosis, often forced by war and persecution, people have fled their homes and sought refuge across the globe since time immemorial.The film evokes this sense of perpetual migration with lyrical imagery and a discursive approach to storytelling. Children run in circles around their cramped shack in a refugee camp in Malaysia; trash swirls across another camp in Lebanon; rings of fire burn in the oil fields of Mosul. Spanning more than 23 countries and 40 of the world’s largest refugee camps, Human Flow captures victims of conflict in the difficult holding patterns that have come to define their lives. The documentary is at once an intimate, on-the-ground travelogue and a sweeping cinematic experience.

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  • You can marry for love, you can marry for money, or, in Beijing, you can marry for a license plate.As authorities try to cap the number of vehicles in China’s car-choked capital, they’ve taken to doling out new license plates via a six-time-a-year lottery. The odds are daunting. This June alone, more than 2.8 million people entered the drawing, and officials handed plates out at the lowest rate ever: one per 843 entries.Since any driver who has resided in Beijing for more than a year can register, the drawing is fair in principle. But the license-plate system has a big loophole. While private sales of license plates are banned, the rules allow transfers between spouses.Thus one solution: sham marriages. In crowded forums and chat rooms, plate owners offer to tie the knot—for the right price.“All we need is a marriage registration, and we can get you a license plate,” one middleman boasts in an online ad. “No need for the lottery—pay once and get the benefit for life!”

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  • A well-regarded Hollywood insider recently suggested that sequels can represent “a sort of creative bankruptcy.” He was discussing Pixar, the legendary animation studio, and its avowed distaste for cheap spin-offs. More pointedly, he argued that if Pixar were only to make sequels, it would “wither and die.” Now, all kinds of industry experts say all kinds of things. But it is surely relevant that these observations were made by Ed Catmull, the president of Pixar, in his best-selling 2014 business-leadership book.Yet here comes Cars 3, rolling into a theater near you this month. You may recall that the original Cars, released back in 2006, was widely judged to be the studio’s worst film to date. Cars 2, which followed five years later, was panned as even worse. And if Cars 3 isn’t disheartening enough, two of the three Pixar films in line after it are also sequels: The Incredibles 2 and (say it isn’t so!) Toy Story 4.

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  • The rate of death from opioid overdoses in the United States has more than doubled over the past decade. Amid a deluge of reports on the national crisis, it’s easy to lose sight of the fact that in much of the world many people die in preventable pain, without access to morphine for end-of-life care.This is the finding of a global commission published in The Lancet, which includes analysis of the global distribution of narcotics. The above map shows a relative distribution of how much of the need for opioids is met in various places.The focus of the report is addressing a relatively new target in global health, “serious health-related suffering” as a measure of the need for care. Palliative care, specifically, “should be focused on relieving the serious health-related suffering that is associated with life-limiting or life-threatening conditions or the end of life,” the authors write.The idea is that suffering isn’t always preventable, but a few cents’ worth of morphine can make an enormous difference. Some 45 percent of the 56.2 million people who died in 2015 experienced serious suffering, the authors found. That included 2.5 million children. More than 80 percent of the people were from developing regions, and the vast majority had no access to palliative care and pain relief.

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  • Public schools have always occupied prime space in the excitable American imagination. For decades, if not centuries, politicians have made hay of their supposed failures and extortions. In 2004, Rod Paige, then George W. Bush’s secretary of education, called the country’s leading teachers union a “terrorist organization.” In his first education speech as president, in 2009, Barack Obama lamented the fact that “despite resources that are unmatched anywhere in the world, we’ve let our grades slip, our schools crumble, our teacher quality fall short, and other nations outpace us.”President Donald Trump used the occasion of his inaugural address to bemoan the way “beautiful” students had been “deprived of all knowledge” by our nation’s cash-guzzling schools. Educators have since recoiled at the Trump administration’s budget proposal detailing more than $9 billion in education cuts, including to after-school programs that serve mostly poor children. These cuts came along with increased funding for school-privatization efforts such as vouchers. Our secretary of education, Betsy DeVos, has repeatedly signaled her support for school choice and privatization, as well as her scorn for public schools, describing them as a “dead end” and claiming that unionized teachers “care more about a system, one that was created in the 1800s, than they care about individual students.”Few people care more about individual students than public-school teachers do, but what’s really missing in this dystopian narrative is a hearty helping of reality: 21st-century public schools, with their record numbers of graduates and expanded missions, are nothing close to the cesspools portrayed by political hyperbole. This hyperbole was not invented by Trump or DeVos, but their words and proposals have brought to a boil something that’s been simmering for a while—the denigration of our public schools, and a growing neglect of their role as an incubator of citizens.

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  • Like many people, I’ve lately been preoccupied by the mayhem-makers of the radical right, and by those in power who abet their work. But even as Nazis were invading Charlottesville, Virginia, in August, I found myself worrying about a more subtle, but still substantially pernicious, manifestation of democratic decay. This is the apparently deathless attempt by certain rightist Republicans to bring Hillary Clinton to “justice,” a cause rationalized this way by one such Republican, a freshman congressman from Florida named Matt Gaetz: “Just because Hillary Clinton lost the election doesn’t mean we should forget or forgive conduct that is likely criminal.”Let us lay aside the question of whether the charges of criminality leveled against Clinton are specious (they certainly seem to be) and focus instead on the novelty of Gaetz’s mission. The idea he is endorsing—if not on behalf of Donald Trump, then in the spirit of Donald Trump—is that the political party that wins power is duty-bound to hound to the point of actual prosecution the losing party.This is un-American, and I mean that in a very specific way. I’ve spent much of my reporting career covering countries that are not ruled by law, and that do not venerate the democratic norms of restraint, moderation, forgiveness, and compromise. It is common for autocratic rulers, even those who took office through ostensibly democratic elections, to persecute the individuals and parties that they have vanquished, for reasons ranging from paranoia to simple vindictiveness. America, though, has been different. It is not uncommon in the U.S. for the losers to challenge the victories of the winners, and this is as it should be. But it is a dangerous innovation to use the instruments of state power to harass powerless, defeated political foes. The fractures that this sort of behavior causes are not easily healed.

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  • In the coming decades, artificial intelligence will replace a lot of human jobs, from driving trucks to analyzing X-rays. But it will also work with us, taking over mundane personal tasks and enhancing our cognitive capabilities. As AI continues to improve, digital assistants—often in the form of disembodied voices—will become our helpers and collaborators, managing our schedules, guiding us through decisions, and making us better at our jobs. We’ll have something akin to Samantha from the movie Her or Jarvis from Iron Man: AI “agents” that know our likes and dislikes, and that free us up to focus on what humans do best, or what we most enjoy. Here’s what to expect.Anyone who’s used Siri (on Apple products) or Alexa (on Amazon Echo) has already spoken with a digital assistant. In the future, such “conversational platforms” will be our primary means of interacting with AI, according to Kun Jing, who oversees a digital assistant called Duer for the Chinese search engine Baidu. The big tech companies are racing to create the one agent to rule them all: In addition to Siri, Alexa, and Duer, there’s Microsoft’s Cortana, Facebook’s M, and Google Assistant. Even Mattel is getting in on the action: It recently announced Aristotle, a voice-controlled AI device that can soothe babies, read bedtime stories, and tutor older kids.

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  • MERCED, California—Seccora Jaimes knows that she is not living in the land of opportunity. Her hometown has one of the highest unemployment rates in the nation, at 9.1 percent. Jaimes, 34, recently got laid off from the beauty school where she taught cosmetology, and hasn’t yet found another job. Her daughter, 17, wants the family to move to Los Angeles, so that she can attend one of the nation’s top police academies. Jaimes’s husband, who works in warehousing, would make much more money in Los Angeles, she told me. But one thing is stopping them: The cost of housing. “I don’t know if we could find a place out there that’s reasonable for us, that we could start any job and be okay,” she told me. Indeed, the average rent for a two-bedroom apartment in Merced, in California’s Central Valley, is $750. In Los Angeles, it’s $2,710.America used to be a place where moving one’s family and one’s life in search of greater opportunities was common. During the Gold Rush, the Depression, and the postwar expansion West millions of Americans left their hometowns for places where they could earn more and provide a better life for their children. But mobility has fallen in recent years. While 3.6 percent of the population moved to a different state between 1952 and 1953, that number had fallen to 2.7 percent between 1992 and 1993, and to 1.5 percent between 2015 and 2016. (The share of people who move at all, even within the same county, has fallen too, from 20 percent in 1947 to 11.2 percent today.)

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  • Being a liberal in the Donald Trump era is tricky. On the one hand, you’re grateful for any conservative who denounces the president’s authoritarian lies. On the other, you can’t help but notice that many of the conservatives who condemn Trump most passionately—Bill Kristol, Bret Stephens, Michael Gerson, Jennifer Rubin—remain wedded to the foreign policy legacy of George W. Bush. And in criticizing Trump’s amoral “isolationism,” they backhandedly defend the disastrous interventionism that helped produce his presidency in the first place.The godfather of this brand of hawkish, anti-Trump conservatism is John McCain. Sure, McCain—being a Republican Senator—doesn’t condemn Trump as forthrightly as his “neoconservative” allies in the press. But the terms of his critique are similar.Look at his speech on Tuesday after being awarded the National Constitution Center’s Liberty Medal. In a clear swipe at Trump, McCain warned that, “To fear the world we have organized and led for three-quarters of a century, to abandon the ideals we have advanced around the globe, to refuse the obligations of international leadership and our duty to remain ‘the last best hope of earth’ for the sake of some half-baked, spurious nationalism cooked up by people who would rather find scapegoats than solve problems is as unpatriotic as an attachment to any other tired dogma of the past that Americans consigned to the ash heap of history. We live in a land made of ideals, not blood and soil. We are the custodians of those ideals at home, and their champion abroad.”As a man, McCain is as honorable as Trump is dishonorable. But this narrative is false. The last seventy-five years of American foreign policy are not the story of a country consistently pursuing democratic ideals, only to see them undermined now by a fearful “blood and soil” isolationism.

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Don’t Forget to Adjust for Russian Trolls – The Atlantic

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The Atlantic
Don’t Forget to Adjust for Russian Trolls
The Atlantic
“According to our intelligence services, the Russian government has made a project of turning Americans against each other,” Bush said. “This effort is broad, systematic, and stealthy, it’s conducted across a range of social-media platforms.” He urged 

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The Daily 202: Obama and Bush deliver calls to action against Trumpism – Washington Post

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Dallas News (blog)
The Daily 202: Obama and Bush deliver calls to action against Trumpism
Washington Post
‘This significantly undermines the intelligence community’s credibility.’” — Trump has personally interviewed at least two U.S. attorney candidates in New York — a move that critics say raises questions about their independence should either be 
George W. Bush condemns bullying, bigotry, nativism in age of TrumpDallas News (blog)
George W. Bush Slaps Trump in SpeechUSA Herald
George W. Bush jabs at Trump’s America: “Bigotry or white-supremacy in any form” is un-AmericanAOL

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Russian Americans divided over Trump, fear another Cold War – Washington Post

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Washington Post
Russian Americans divided over Trump, fear another Cold War
Washington Post
WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. — Anastasia Kurteeva worries about a new Cold War. She’s afraid that escalating tensions between the United States and Russia will make it harder for people to travel freely between the countries, harder for her parents in …

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The Early Edition: October 20, 2017 

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Before the start of business, Just Security provides a curated summary of up-to-the-minute developments at home and abroad. Here’s today’s news.

SYRIA

The U.S.-backed Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (S.D.F.) declared “total liberation” of the city of Raqqa today, the spokesperson for the S.D.F. claiming that the defeat of the Islamic State militants in their de facto capital in Syria was a “historic victory” and that the future of the city would be “decided by its people.” Arwa Damon, Ghazi Balkiz and Laura Smith-Spark report at CNN.

Raqqa would form part of a decentralized federal Syria, the S.D.F. said today, however plans for autonomous zones in northern Syria have faced opposition from the U.S., Turkey and the Syrian government. Reuters reports.

The S.D.F. raised a banner bearing the image of Kurdish nationalist leader Abdullah Öcalan in the city of Raqqa yesterday, the controversial Turkish Marxist leader is detained in Turkey as a terrorist and the S.D.F.’s symbolic action has raised concerns among the majority Arab population that the Kurds would take control of Raqqa. Raja Abdulrahim reports at the Wall Street Journal.

A Syrian peoples’ congress bringing Syria’s ethnic groups together is being considered by Russia and others, Moscow said today, Reuters reporting.

The defeat of the terrorists in Syria is imminent, the Russian President Vladimir Putin said yesterday, noting the progress of Russia and Syrian government forces operations in the country and saying that the Syrian peace process was developing in a positive way. Reuters reports.

The recent territorial gains by the Russia and Iran-backed Syrian government forces in eastern Syria have changed the dynamics on the battlefield, giving Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime greater leverage in any future political negotiations and forcing the U.S. military to reconsider its assumptions about the picture on the ground. Karen DeYoung and Liz Sly report at the Washington Post.

The Israeli military “targeted the source” of mortar fire from Syrian territory yesterday, according to the Israeli military. The AP reports.

Saudi Arabia’s Gulf Affairs Minister visited Raqqa yesterday to discuss reconstruction, meeting with the U.S. special envoy to the coalition against the Islamic State Brett McGurk and an adviser to the Raqqa civil council. Reuters reports.

The next phase of the Syrian war is set to include complex conflicts that redefine alliances on the ground as the common threat posed by the Islamic State group dwindles, the issue of control over the city of Raqqa leading to tension and the pro-Syrian government forces expected to turn their attention to the Syrian rebels. Anne Barnard and Hwaida Saad explain at the New York Times.

The defeat of Islamic State militants in key cities in Syria and Iraq has brought untold destruction. Megan Specia reveals the scale of the challenge to rebuild at the New York Times.

The power of the U.S. military was demonstrated in Raqqa and in the fight against the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq, however neither the Obama administration nor the Trump administration devised a clear political strategy for what should come next. David Ignatius writes at the Washington Post.

U.S.-led airstrikes continue. U.S. and coalition forces carried out five airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Syria on October 18. Separately, partner forces conducted seven strikes against targets in Iraq. [Central Command]

NORTH KOREA

“We ought to behave” as if the North Korea is on the “cusp” of being able to hit the U.S. with a nuclear missile, the C.I.A. Director Mike Pompeo said yesterday at an event organized by the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, emphasizing that the U.S. prefers diplomacy, but military options would remain a possibility. Nicole Gaouette reports at CNN.

Pompeo highlighted that there was a difference between an ability to fire a single nuclear missile and having an arsenal of nuclear missiles, also saying that China could do more to rein in North Korea. The AP reports.

National security adviser H.R. McMaster also emphasized that the U.S. was pursuing diplomatic efforts at the same event, saying that the U.S. is “not out of time, but we are running out of time.” Demetri Sevastopulo reports at the Financial Times.

North Korea urged Australia to turn away from the “heinous and reckless moves of the Trump administration” in a letter, according to Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, who said that Pyongyang had also sent the letter to other nations. The BBC reports.

Turnbull dismissed the letter as a “rant” and a sign that North Korea was “starting to feel the squeeze” from the increased sanctions against the regime. Rod McGuirk reports at the AP.

A U.S. pre-emptive strike on North Korea would be unlikely to destroy all of Pyongyang’s nuclear arsenal, Russian president Vladimir Putin said yesterday, Reuters reporting.

“North Korea should not be backed into a corner,” Putin said yesterday, warning against the possibility of conflict and stating that “problems should be solved in dialogue.” Carlo Angerer reports at NBC News.

The mountain under which North Korea tests its nuclear weapons is suffering from “tired mountain syndrome,” according to some analysts, the impact of the testing changing the geological makeup of Mount Mantap that could lead to its collapse and consequent radiation release. Anna Fifield reports at the Washington Post.

IRAN

The President does not intend to “interfere with business deals that the Europeans may have under way with Iran,” Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said yesterday, following Trump’s decision last week not to certify Iran’s compliance with the 2015 nuclear deal, Tillerson seemingly attempting to assuage concerns about the possibility of new U.S. sanctions on Iran impacting European banks and firms. Felicia Schwartz and Laurence Norman report at the Wall Street Journal.

The leaders of the 28 European Union countries affirmed their commitment to the Iran deal at a summit yesterday, according to the spokesperson for the European Council Preben Aamann. The AP reports.

The deal “remains valid despite the decision of the president of the United States not to certify its implementation,” the French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said yesterday after a meeting with the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency (I.A.E.A.) Yukiya Amano, reaffirming France’s support for the nuclear deal. The AP reports.

Iran remains “cautious” and the I.A.E.A. continues its “control and verification activities without any problems,” Amano said after his meeting with Le Drian, saying that Trump’s decision has not yet caused any problems. Reuters reports.

Leaving the fate of the Iran deal to Congress is “very dangerous” and opens the door to “party politics,” former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, who negotiated the 2015 deal, said yesterday, warning that Trump’s actions could risk worsening the crisis on the Korean Peninsula as it sent a signal to the Pyongyang regime that the U.S. does not keep its word. Stephanie Nebehay reports at Reuters.

TRUMP-RUSSIA

“The intelligence community’s assessment is that the Russian meddling that took place did not affect the outcome of the assessment,” C.I.A. Director Mike Pompeo said yesterday, his comments distorting the findings of a report compiled by the C.I.A. and other intelligence agencies and released in January saying that Moscow sought to undermine public faith in U.S. political processes and support Trump’s presidential campaign. Greg Miller reports at the Washington Post.

“The intelligence assessment with regard to Russian election meddling has not changed,” C.I.A. spokesperson Ryan Trapani said yesterday following Pompeo’s remarks. Max Greenwood reports at the Hill.

“Not true,” the former C.I.A. Deputy Director David Cohen tweeted yesterday, responding to Pompeo’s comments, clarifying that the intelligence community “made no judgment on whether Russian interference” affected the election, Cohen was joined by others who criticized Pompeo. Michael Crowley reports at POLITICO.

Trump suggested that the F.B.I. were involved in the salacious dossier alleging links between the Trump campaign and Russia in a tweet yesterday,  the F.B.I. did offer to pay former British Intelligence officer Christopher Steele who compiled the dossier in October 2016, but did not pursue further work with Steele once he became a publicly known figure. Anne Gearan and Devlin Barrett report at the Washington Post.

“When a country can come interfere in another country’s elections, that is warfare,” the U.S. ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley said yesterday, reproaching Russia for meddling in the 2016 U.S. election and in a pointed departure from Trump’s stance on Russian involvement. Joel Gehrke reports at the Washington Examiner.

A bipartisan bill expanding laws on political ads on social media platforms was unveiled yesterday in response to revelations of Russian interference in U.S. politics, the measures would include greater requirements on transparency and disclosure. Ashley Gold and Nancy Scola report at POLITICO.

Twitter’s acting general counsel Sean Edgett will testify before the House and Senate Intelligence committees on Nov. 1, Twitter said yesterday. Ali Breland reports at the Hill.

The Russian oligarch Dmitry Rybolovlev, who has been under scrutiny for his connections to the Trump campaign, is under investigation in Monaco for alleged violations of privacy. Stephanie Kirchgaessner and Luke Harding report at the Guardian.

NIGER

The F.B.I. have joined the investigation into the killing of four U.S. special forces members in Niger two weeks ago, the F.B.I. has not taken over the investigation but has made the intervention amid criticism over a lack of detail about the incident. Ben Kesling and Julian E. Barnes report at the Wall Street Journal.

The ambush in Niger “was considered unlikely,” Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said yesterday, adding that the Pentagon would release findings from the Pentagon investigation into the attack “as rapidly” as possible. Connor O’Brien and Wesley Morgan report at POLITICO.

The chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee John McCain (R-Ariz.) may issue a subpoena to understand the circumstances surrounding the Niger ambush, McCain said yesterday, saying that the White House had not been forthcoming with information needed by the committee. Idrees Ali reports at Reuters.

“We have kept them up to date. Of course we will work with Sen. McCain and his staff,” the Pentagon chief spokesperson Dana White said yesterday, insisting that the Pentagon has been communicating with Congress about the Niger attack. Ellen Mitchell reports at the Hill.

IRAQ

Iraqi federal forces and Kurdish Peshmerga forces exchanged fire today at their border in Iraq amid increased tensions between the two U.S. allies and the Iraqi federal forces’ sweeping gains in Iraqi Kurdistan and disputed territories over the past week. Balint Szlanko reports at the AP.

The semiautonomous Kurdish Regional Government (K.R.G.) in northern Iraq welcomed calls for dialogue from Iraqi Prime Minister Haidar al-Abadi, the K.R.G. saying in a statement yesterday that they have asked the international community to help negotiation efforts. Reuters reports.

News agencies and social media accounts have been amplifying tensions in Iraqi Kurdistan, sensationalizing stories and contributing to the creation of a sense of chaos. Tamer El-Ghobashy and Loveday Morris report at the Washington Post.

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION FOREIGN POLICY

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson seeks to re-orientate the U.S. relationship with China and address the imbalanced trade relationship, he said in an interview yesterday, also acknowledging in the interview that he has a different style to the president and has no intentions of leaving his post. Michael C. Bender and Felicia Schwartz report at the Wall Street Journal.

“China is dedicated to developing long-term healthy and stable relations with the United States,” China’s Foreign Ministry spokesperson Lu Kang said yesterday, responding to Tillerson’s comments on Wednesday that China’s actions have been undermining the international order. James Griffiths and Steven Jiang report at CNN.

“I do not have a lot of expectations” that the crisis in the Gulf would be “resolved any time soon,” Tillerson said yesterday, saying that Qatar has shown it is “ready to engage” and the Saudi-led bloc that isolated the country on June 5 should show that they would reciprocate. Al Jazeera reports.

RUSSIA

Russia would retaliate if the U.S. takes steps to pressure Russian media outlets, Russian President Vladimir Putin said yesterday, Reuters reports.

Russia is not concerned by the U.S. military build-up in the Baltic region, Putin also said yesterday, Reuters reporting.

Russia would respond immediately if the U.S. withdraws from the intermediate-range nuclear forces treaty, Putin said yesterday, Reuters reporting.

Russian warships arrived in the Philippines today in a sign of increasingly close relations between the two countries and the Philippines’ move away from the U.S. and China. The AP reports.

The TRAVEL BAN

The Trump administration is considering scaling up its vetting processes for refugee women and children, according to a source familiar with the matter, bringing the process closer into line with the checks taken against adult men refugees. Yeganeh Torbati and Mica Rosenberg report at Reuters.

Trump’s latest travel ban is “equally pointless” as the previous orders and the administration’s vow to appeal the Hawaii court and Maryland courts’ rulings on the revised order is misguided as the policy achieves nothing and the administration would be wise “to let the ban fade away.” The Washington Post editorial board writes.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

A top Islamic State operative was “taken” in a gunfight in the Philippine city of Marawi, the Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte announced yesterday. Felipe Villamor report at the New York Times.

A U.S. drone strike killed the leader of a militant Pakistan group yesterday, a spokesperson for the militants said yesterday, Saud Mehsud reports at Reuters.

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) suggested using a subpoena to force the Trump administration regarding cybersecurity policy yesterday, Morgan Chalfant reports at the Hill.

A Palestinian unity government offers the hope for peace talks to progress, however it could also raise more difficulties as the Islamist Hamas militants in the Gaza Strip are considered a terrorist group and the U.S. and Israel have both stated that Hamas must explicitly renounce violence and recognize the state of Israel before negotiations can take place. David M. Halbfinger sets out the obstacles to peace at the New York Times.

Lasting stability in Somalia seems elusive but the Somali President must continue the military and political strategy against the al-Qaeda-linked al-Shabaab militants as there is evidence of some success. Alex De Waal writes at Foreign Policy.

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Russia, the Blizzard of Lies

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Russia Is a Bigger Threat to US Than North Korea or ISIS: Ex-NATO Commander – Newsweek

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Newsweek
Russia Is a Bigger Threat to US Than North Korea or ISIS: Ex-NATO Commander
Newsweek
Russia remains a greater threat to U.S. security than North Korea or the Islamic State militant group (ISIS) because President Vladimir Putin still views the world in “Cold War terms,” according to an ex-NATO commander. … There are four separate 
Putin Threatens Restrictions on US Media if Washington Pressures Russian MediaVoice of America

all 5 news articles »

CIA director gets fact-checked on his assessment of Russia’s 2016 election meddling – The Week Magazine

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CIA director gets fact-checked on his assessment of Russia’s 2016 election meddling
The Week Magazine
… an assessment of the impact that Russian activities had on the outcome of the 2016 election,” describing the Moscow-linked activities as unprecedented in scope and aimed at undermining American faith in its institutions and helping elect President 

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Russia, the Blizzard of Lies – New York Times

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New York Times
Russia, the Blizzard of Lies
New York Times
He has denounced his intelligence agencies’ findings as a “hoax” and the multiple investigationsas a “witch hunt.” His White House has lied about his campaign’s contacts with Russians. He reportedly helped … Trump added to the blizzard yesterday 

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Opioid Crisis – News Review | The World News and Times

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The opioid epidemic or opioid crisis is the rapid increase in the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in the United States and Canada in the 2010s. Opioids are a diverse class of moderately strong painkillers, including oxycodone (commonly sold under the trade names OxyContin and Percocet), hydrocodone (Vicodin), and a very strong painkiller, fentanyl, which is synthesized to resemble other opiates such as opium-derived morphine and heroin. The potency and availability of these substances, despite their high risk of addiction and overdose, have made them popular both as formal medical treatments and as recreational drugs. Due to their sedative effects on the part of the brain which regulates breathing, opioids in high doses present the potential for respiratory depression, and may cause respiratory failure and death.[2] 

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Russian propaganda on social media – News Review: Russians Posing as Black Activists on Facebook | The World News and Times

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Selected Articles – 7:32 AM 10/20/2017

Russian Twitter Campaign Seeks to Divide America. theTrumpet.com–Oct 5, 2017. A network of Russia- affiliated Twitter accounts attempted to fan the flames of … to the Russian government-affiliated troll farm known as the Internet … Facebook and its … 

6:04 PM 10/19/2017 – Russia-sponsored troll networks


Daily Beast
Trump Campaign Staffers Pushed Russian Propaganda Days Before the Election
Daily Beast
The discovery of the now-unavailable tweets presents the first evidence that several members of the Trump campaign pushed covert Russian propaganda on social media in the run-up to the 2016 election. A Twitter spokesperson declined to comment, “for …
Michael Flynn, Nicki Minaj shared content from this Tennessee GOP account. But it wasn’t real. It wasRussian.Washington Post
Twitter Was Warned Repeatedly About This Fake Account Run By A Russian Troll Farm And Refused To Take It DownBuzzFeed Newsall 19 news articles »

3:32 PM 10/19/2017 – Russians Posing as Black Activists on Facebook – Google News

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3:32 PM 10/19/2017 – Russians Posing as Black Activists on Facebook – Google News 

3:42 PM 10/19/2017 – This past summer, a Facebook account called Blacktivist… – Russians Posing As Black…

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3:42 PM 10/19/2017 – This past summer, a Facebook account called Blacktivist… 

Russians Posing As Black Activists On Facebook

3:50 PM 10/19/2017 – Did Russia fake black activism on Facebook to sow division in the US? – Russians…

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3:50 PM 10/19/2017 – Did Russia fake black activism on Facebook to sow division in the US? – Russians Posing As Black Activists On Facebook – Google News 

Russian propaganda on social media from Mike Nova – News Review 

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3:32 PM 10/19/2017 – Russians Posing as Black Activists on Facebook – Google News

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3:32 PM 10/19/2017 – Russians Posing as Black Activists on Facebook – Google News

3:42 PM 10/19/2017 – This past summer, a Facebook account called Blacktivist… – Russians Posing As Black…

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3:42 PM 10/19/2017 – This past summer, a Facebook account called Blacktivist… – Russians Posing As Black Activists On Facebook

3:50 PM 10/19/2017 – Did Russia fake black activism on Facebook to sow division in the US? – Russians…

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3:50 PM 10/19/2017 – Did Russia fake black activism on Facebook to sow division in the US? – Russians Posing As Black Activists On Facebook – Google News
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4:40 PM 10/19/2017 – Trump suggests FBI may have ‘paid for’ dossier alleging Russia ties – FBI paid …

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4:40 PM 10/19/2017 – Trump suggests FBI may have ‘paid for’ dossier alleging Russia ties – FBI paid for dossier (?) – Google Search

6:32 PM 10/19/2017 – Anonymous Online Political Ads

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6:32 PM 10/19/2017 – Anonymous Online Political Ads

6:43 PM 10/19/2017 – Russia-sponsored troll networks still operating, targeting America

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6:43 PM 10/19/2017 – Russia-sponsored troll networks still operating, targeting America

Report: Google Uncovers Russia-Paid Ads On YouTube, Gmail – RadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty

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RadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty
Report: Google Uncovers Russia-Paid Ads On YouTube, Gmail
RadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty
“Russian agents” spent tens of thousands of dollars on advertisements on YouTube, Gmail, Google search, and other products in an attempt to spread disinformation, the newspaper reported on October 9, citing anonymous sources it said were familiar with 
Russian operatives spent thousands of dollars on Google ads, source claimsThe Guardian
Google uncovers Russian-bought ads on YouTube, Gmail and other platformsWashington Post
Russia Recruited YouTubers to Bash ‘Racist B*tch’ Hillary Clinton Over Rap BeatsDaily Beast

all 219 news articles »

10 million people saw Russia sponsored Facebook ads in the US – IT PRO

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IT PRO
10 million people saw Russia sponsored Facebook ads in the US
IT PRO
10 million people saw Russia sponsored Facebook ads in the US …. Sources told the publication that the Facebook representatives traced the ad sales to a Russian “troll farm” which has published pro-Kremlin propaganda in the past. … The social 
Exclusive: Russian-linked Facebook ads targeted Michigan and WisconsinCNN

all 251 news articles »

Russian Twitter Campaign Seeks to Divide America – theTrumpet.com

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theTrumpet.com
Russian Twitter Campaign Seeks to Divide America
theTrumpet.com
network of Russia-affiliated Twitter accounts attempted to fan the flames of the ongoing National Football League controversy in the United States, the New York Times reported on September 27. These accounts tried to … “The decision to target the 
Exclusive: Russian-linked Facebook ads targeted Michigan and WisconsinCNN
Suspected Russian Facebook Ads Were Targeted to Specific StatesNBCNews.com
Facebook Cut Russia Out of April Report on Election InfluenceWall Street Journal
Tableau Public – Tableau Software
all 220 news articles »
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Russia-sponsored troll networks still operating, targeting America – McClatchy Washington Bureau

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McClatchy Washington Bureau
Russia-sponsored troll networks still operating, targeting America
McClatchy Washington Bureau
The number of networks of Russian-sponsored trolls spreading propaganda to the United States and Europe may number in the hundreds, including the one team drawing wide attention for blitzing American social media outlets last year with divisive …

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Russian Facebook Ads Targeted Muslims, Gun Owners, Black Lives Matter – Fortune

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Fortune
Russian Facebook Ads Targeted Muslims, Gun Owners, Black Lives Matter
Fortune
Other Russian-linked accounts tried hiding themselves on the left, posing as gay rightsactivists and also promoting the Black Lives Matter movement. The Times noted that the goal of these accounts was likely to create viral posts, build a social 
Facebook’s Russia-Linked Ads Came in Many DisguisesNew York Times
Facebook says estimated 10 million saw Russia-linked ads apparently designed to exploit divisions in American societyPittsburgh Post-Gazette
Russian Facebook ads showed a black woman firing a rifle, amid efforts to stoke racial strifeWashington Post

all 298 news articles »

Exclusive: Even Pokémon Go used by extensive Russian-linked meddling effort – CNNMoney

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CNNMoney
Exclusive: Even Pokémon Go used by extensive Russian-linked meddling effort
CNNMoney
One Russian-linked campaign posing as part of the Black Lives Matter movement usedFacebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr and Pokémon Go and even contacted some reporters in an effort to exploit racial tensions and sow discord among … of the 
Russians Reportedly Also Abused YouTube, Pokémon Go in 2016 ElectioneWeek
Russia Said To Have Used Pokemon Go To Divide AmericansValueWalk
CNN: ‘Pokemon Go’ was used by Russian trolls to sow discord on social mediaBGR
Forbes –New York Post –Bustle –AndroidGuys
all 129 news articles »

Even Pokémon Go used by extensive Russian-linked meddling effort – KMOV.com

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KMOV.com
Even Pokémon Go used by extensive Russian-linked meddling effort
KMOV.com
One Russian-linked campaign posing as part of the Black Lives Matter movement usedFacebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr and Pokémon Go and even contacted some reporters in an effort to exploit racial tensions and sow discord among … of the 
Exclusive: Even Pokémon Go used by extensive Russian-linked meddling effortCNNMoney

all 16 news articles »

Russian troll factory paid US activists to help fund protests during election – The Guardian

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The Guardian
Russian troll factory paid US activists to help fund protests during election
The Guardian
Russian trolls posing as Americans made payments to genuine activists in the US to help fund protest movements on socially divisive issues, according to a new investigation by a respected Russian media outlet. On Tuesday, the newspaper … RBC said it 
Russian Online Troll Farm Fooled Black Activists In Election Disruption SchemeHip-Hop Wired
Russian ‘Troll Factory’ Paid American Activists, Funded ProtestsNewsmax (blog)
Kremlin oligarch dubbed Putin’s ‘chef’ unmasked as the money behind a major Russian ‘troll factory’Daily Mail
CNN
all 35 news articles »

Russians Posing as Black Activists on Facebook Is More Than Fake News – WIRED

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WIRED
Russians Posing as Black Activists on Facebook Is More Than Fake News
WIRED
As the entrance to social activism has become that much more attuned to the innovations of contemporary life, people are eager to align their beliefs with those in similar fights, and publicFacebook accounts and groups serve as communal nerve centers, …

and more »

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Russian Twitter account pretending to be Tennessee GOP fools celebrities, politicians – The Mercury News

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The Mercury News
Russian Twitter account pretending to be Tennessee GOP fools celebrities, politicians
The Mercury News
Russian operatives used a fake Twitter account that claimed to speak for Tennessee Republicans to convince American politicians, celebrities and journalists to share select content with their own massive lists of followers, two people familiar with the 
Twitter Was Warned Repeatedly About This Fake Account Run By A Russian Troll Farm And Refused To Take It DownBuzzFeed News
Trump Campaign Staffers Pushed Russian Propaganda Days Before the ElectionDaily Beast

all 19 news articles »

Russian Propaganda Targeted US Vets And Service Members Via Social Media – Task & Purpose

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Task & Purpose
Russian Propaganda Targeted US Vets And Service Members Via Social Media
Task & Purpose
Russia has exploited social media networks to target current and former U.S. military personnel with propaganda, conspiracy theories and other misinformation, achieving “significant and persistent interactions” on Twitter during one month last spring 
Study: Russian Propaganda Targeted Engaged US Vets, Active-Duty Troops on Social MediaDaily Beast
Russia targeted US troops, vets on social media, study findsThe Hill

all 3 news articles »

Russian Propaganda Targeted Vets, Troops via Social Media: Study – Military.com

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Military.com
Russian Propaganda Targeted Vets, Troops via Social Media: Study
Military.com
WASHINGTON — Russia has exploited social media networks to target current and former U.S. military personnel with propaganda, conspiracy theories and other misinformation, achieving “significant and persistent interactions” on Twitter during one month …
How Russia’s Propaganda Campaign Exploited America’s PrejudicesTPM
Facebook, Google, Twitter: How tech giants are involved in the Russia investigationFox News
Russian SocialMedia Propaganda Targeted US Military Personnel, VetsMediaPost Communications
The Hill –TechCrunch –Markets Insider –Axios
all 409 news articles »

In attempt to sow fear, Russian trolls paid for self-defense classes for African Americans – CNNMoney

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CNNMoney
In attempt to sow fear, Russian trolls paid for self-defense classes for African Americans
CNNMoney
… ads paid personal trainers in New York, Florida, and other parts of the United States to run self-defense classes for African Americans in an apparent attempt to stoke fear and gather contact details of Americans potentially susceptible to their 

and more »

6:04 PM 10/19/2017 – Russia-sponsored troll networks

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6:04 PM 10/19/2017 – Russia-sponsored troll networks

The government’s shameful role in the opioid crisis – Washington Post

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Washington Post
The government’s shameful role in the opioid crisis
Washington Post
MULTIPLE, GLARING government breakdowns are documented in the revealing investigation of the opioid-overdose epidemic by The Post and CBS’s “60 Minutes.” The report exposed weakening federal enforcement of drug distribution; corrosive industry …
Trump keeps kicking opioid crisis down the roadUSA TODAY
Washington Post, 60 Minutes Investigation Finds Bill Helped Fuel Opioid CrisisNPR
The Ripple Effects of the Opioid CrisisEsquire.com
NewCo Shift –New York Magazine –The Guardian –CBS News
all 497 news articles »
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People Are Dying Because of Ignorance, not Because of Opioids … – Scientific American

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Scientific American
People Are Dying Because of Ignorance, not Because of Opioids …
Scientific American
Recently, driven largely by opioid-related deaths—predominantly of our white sisters and brothers—President Donald Trump proclaimed that the opioid problem …
Misdiagnosing Causes and Casualties in the Opioid WarReason (blog)
Facing the opioid epidemic, doctors struggle to find solutionsKMSP-TV
Penn State social science researchers collaborate to study opioid epidemicPenn State News

all 17 news articles »

The opioid epidemic in America – Washington Post

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Washington Post
The opioid epidemic in America
Washington Post
The Post/“60 Minutes” report on the United States’ opioid epidemic was excellent, but it didn’t dig down far enough. The shares of these manufacturers and distributors are traded on the stock exchanges and are publicly owned. So, the real culprits are 
Opioid epidemic burns bright when democracy dies in greed and ignoranceThe Hill
Editorial: How Congress and drug companies fueled the opioid epidemicBoulder Daily Camera
How big pharma’s money – and its politicians – feed the US opioid …The Guardian
The Providence Journal –Sonoran News –Packaging World
all 78 news articles »

Recreational Marijuana Is Reversing the Opioid Crisis in Colorado, Study Suggests – Big Think

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Big Think
Recreational Marijuana Is Reversing the Opioid Crisis in Colorado, Study Suggests
Big Think
One way for states to curb the opioid crisis might be to completely legalize another drug: marijuana. According to a report set to run in November’s edition of the American Journal of Public Health, the amount of opioid-related deaths dropped by 6.5 

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Russian propaganda on social media – Google Search

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Story image for Russian propaganda on social media from Daily Beast

Trump Campaign Staffers Pushed Russian Propaganda Days …

Daily BeastOct 18, 2017
Trump Campaign Staffers Pushed Russian Propaganda Days … pushed covert Russian propaganda on social media in the run-up to the 2016 …
Twitter Was Warned Repeatedly About This Fake Account Run By A …
Highly CitedBuzzFeed NewsOct 18, 2017
Story image for Russian propaganda on social media from Task & Purpose

Russian Propaganda Targeted US Vets And Service Members Via …

Task & PurposeOct 9, 2017
Russia has exploited social media networks to target current and former U.S. military personnel with propaganda, conspiracy theories and …

Opioid Crisis – Google Search

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Story image for Opioid Crisis from The Guardian

How big pharma’s money – and its politicians – feed the US opioid …

The Guardian21 hours ago
The pharmaceutical industry attempted to place blame for the crisis on the millions who have became addicted instead of the mass prescribing …
Editorial: Elected officials must remain focused on opioid crisis
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle12 hours ago
Media image for Opioid Crisis from WHYY

WHYY

Media image for Opioid Crisis from Daily Beast

Daily Beast

Media image for Opioid Crisis from Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

Media image for Opioid Crisis from The Olympian

The Olympian

Media image for Opioid Crisis from Toledo Blade

Toledo Blade

Media image for Opioid Crisis from Worcester Telegram

Worcester Telegram
Story image for Opioid Crisis from NBCNews.com

Opioid Crisis Forces Grandparents to Raise Their Grandkids

<a href=”http://NBCNews.com” rel=”nofollow”>NBCNews.com</a>34 minutes ago
Pennie never expected her daughter, once a star softball player and honor roll student, to struggle with opioid addiction, or spend her twenties …
Story image for Opioid Crisis from Washington Post

The government’s shameful role in the opioid crisis

Washington PostOct 16, 2017
MULTIPLE, GLARING government breakdowns are documented in the revealing investigation of the opioid-overdose epidemic by The Post …
Story image for Opioid Crisis from U.S. News & World Report

Opioid Crisis Spurs Change at Medical Schools

U.S. News & World Report20 hours ago
Opioid Crisis Spurs Change at Medical Schools … Experts say the prevalence and fatality of opioid addiction makes it a crucial subject to study …
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Can President Trump solve the opioid crisis?

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Can President Trump solve the opioid crisis?

The Washington Post and CBS’s “60 Minutes” teamed up to publish an investigation about the influence that the pharmaceutical industry has had on America’s opioid epidemic. The story takes a deep look at the way the drug industry and drug distributors first pumped huge numbers of opioids into communities, then worked with members of Congress […]


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